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Matti Narkia

Diet and Coronary Thrombosis.,Hypothesis and Fact - Yudkin J - Lancet 1957 - Image001.... - 0 views

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    Diet and Coronary Thrombosis., Hypothesis and Fact
    Yudkin J.
    The Lancet 1957.

    (Figure 9 only)
Matti Narkia

Researchers link calorie intake to cell lifespan, cancer development (w/ Video) - 0 views

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    "Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) have discovered that restricting consumption of glucose, the most common dietary sugar, can extend the life of healthy human-lung cells and speed the death of precancerous human-lung cells, reducing cancer's spread and growth rate.

    The research has wide-ranging potential in age-related science, including ways in which calorie-intake restriction can benefit longevity and help prevent diseases like cancer that have been linked to aging, said principal investigator Trygve Tollefsbol, Ph.D., D.O., a professor in the Department of Biology.

    "These results further verify the potential health benefits of controlling calorie intake." Tollefsbol said. "Our research indicates that calorie reduction extends the lifespan of healthy human cells and aids the body's natural ability to kill off cancer-forming cells.
Matti Narkia

Arch Ophthalmol -- Cigarette Smoking, Fish Consumption, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake, and ... - 0 views

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    Cigarette smoking, fish consumption, omega-3 fatty acid intake, and associations with age-related macular degeneration: the US Twin Study of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.
    Seddon JM, George S, Rosner B.
    Arch Ophthalmol. 2006 Jul;124(7):995-1001.
    PMID: 16832023

    Conclusions This study of twins provides further evidence that cigarette smoking increases risk while fish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid intake reduce risk of AMD
Matti Narkia

Calorie intake linked to cell lifespan, cancer development - 0 views

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    "ScienceDaily (Dec. 17, 2009) - Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) have discovered that restricting consumption of glucose, the most common dietary sugar, can extend the life of healthy human-lung cells and speed the death of precancerous human-lung cells, reducing cancer's spread and growth rate.

    The research has wide-ranging potential in age-related science, including ways in which calorie-intake restriction can benefit longevity and help prevent diseases like cancer that have been linked to aging, said principal investigator Trygve Tollefsbol, Ph.D., D.O., a professor in the Department of Biology.

    "These results further verify the potential health benefits of controlling calorie intake." Tollefsbol said. "Our research indicates that calorie reduction extends the lifespan of healthy human cells and aids the body's natural ability to kill off cancer-forming cells.""
Matti Narkia

Intake of Fish and n3 Fatty Acids and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease Among Japanese: Th... - 0 views

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    Intake of fish and n3 fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease among Japanese: the Japan Public Health Center-Based (JPHC) Study Cohort I.
    Iso H, Kobayashi M, Ishihara J, Sasaki S, Okada K, Kita Y, Kokubo Y, Tsugane S; JPHC Study Group.
    Circulation. 2006 Jan 17;113(2):195-202. Epub 2006 Jan 9.
    PMID: 16401768
    doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.581355

    Conclusions- Compared with a modest fish intake of once a week or &20 g/d, a higher intake was associated with substantially reduced risk of coronary heart disease, primarily nonfatal cardiac events, among middle-aged persons
Matti Narkia

n-3 Fatty acids and cardiovascular disease -- Breslow 83 (6): S1477 -- American Journal... - 0 views

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    n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.
    Breslow JL.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6 Suppl):1477S-1482S. Review.
    PMID: 16841857

    The results of prospective cohort studies indicate that consuming fish or fish oil containing the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with decreased cardiovascular death, whereas consumption of the vegetable oil-derived n-3 fatty acid {alpha}-linolenic acid is not as effective. Randomized control trials (RCTs) in the context of secondary prevention also indicate that the consumption of EPA plus DHA is protective at doses <1 g />3 g/d, EPA plus DHA can improve cardiovascular disease risk factors, including decreasing plasma triacylglycerols, blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and inflammation, while improving vascular reactivity. Mainly on the basis of the results of RCTs, the American Heart Association recommends that everyone eat oily fish twice per week and that those with coronary heart disease eat 1 g/d of EPA plus DHA from oily fish or supplements. Directions for future research include 1) RCTs to confirm the initial trials showing that EPA plus DHA decreases cardiovascular death and additional studies to determine whether this effect is due to EPA, DHA, or the combination; the dosage of the effective components; and whether the mechanism of action in humans is prevention of fatal arrhythmias. 2) Clinical studies to determine whether the reduction in cardiovascular disease risk factors is due to EPA, DHA, or the combination and the dosage of the effective components. 3) Clinical studies to determine whether vegetable oil-derived {alpha}-linolenic acid added to a diet enriched in n-6 fatty acids can effectively substitute for fish oil-derived EPA plus DHA.
Matti Narkia

n-3 Fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: mechanisms underlying beneficial effects --... - 0 views

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    n-3 Fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: mechanisms underlying beneficial effects.
    Jung UJ, Torrejon C, Tighe AP, Deckelbaum RJ.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):2003S-9S.
    PMID: 18541602

    Dietary n-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, are important nutrients through the life cycle. Evidence from observational, clinical, animal, and in vitro studies indicates a beneficial role of n-3 fatty acids in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, clinical and preclinical studies indicate that the cardioprotective effects of n-3 fatty acids may be attributed to a number of distinct biological effects on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, blood pressure, platelet function, arterial cholesterol delivery, vascular function, and inflammatory responses.

    Substantial evidence supports n-3 fatty acids as a practical, therapeutic adjuvant for promoting cardiovascular health and preventing and treating disease. n-3 Fatty acids modulate a number of important physiologic responses that can contribute to their cardioprotective effects. The multiple and complex mechanisms through which DHA and EPA exert their action appear to be distinct but also complementary. However, more studies are needed to quantify their protective effects and to define exact mechanisms of action.
Matti Narkia

High dietary methionine intake increases the risk of acute coronary events in middle-ag... - 0 views

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    High dietary methionine intake increases the risk of acute coronary events in middle-aged men.
    Virtanen JK, Voutilainen S, Rissanen TH, Happonen P, Mursu J, Laukkanen JA, Poulsen H, Lakka TA, Salonen JT.
    Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2006 Mar;16(2):113-20. Epub 2005 Nov 2.
    PMID: 16487911
    doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2005.05.005

    Conclusions
    The main finding of this study is that long-term, moderately high dietary methionine intake may increase the risk of acute coronary events in middle-aged Finnish men free of prior CHD. More prospective research is needed to confirm the role of dietary methionine in the development of CVD, and whether its effects are independent of homocysteine.
Matti Narkia

Fish, Vitamin D, and Flavonoids in Relation to Renal Cell Cancer Among Smokers -- Wilso... - 0 views

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    Fish, vitamin D, and flavonoids in relation to renal cell cancer among smokers.
    Wilson RT, Wang J, Chinchilli V, Richie JP, Virtamo J, Moore LE, Albanes D.
    Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Sep 15;170(6):717-29. Epub 2009 Aug 3.
    PMID: 19651663
    doi:10.1093/aje/kwp178

    These results suggest that the flavonoid quercetin may prevent renal cell cancer among male smokers. The possible risk associated with fish intake warrants further investigation before conclusions may be drawn.
Matti Narkia

Seasonality of UV-radiation and vitamin D status at 69 degrees north. - Photochem Photo... - 1 views

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    Seasonality of UV-radiation and vitamin D status at 69 degrees north.
    Brustad M, Edvardsen K, Wilsgaard T, Engelsen O, Aksnes L, Lund E.
    Photochem Photobiol Sci. 2007 Aug;6(8):903-8. Epub 2007 Jun 27.
    PMID: 17668121

    The generally high dietary intakes of vitamin D, especially in winter, mask largely the effect of seasonal variation in UV-exposure, causing an atypical seasonal variation in vitamin D status. The UV-hour variable significantly predicted 25(OH)D levels in blood when adjusted for intakes and artificial UV-radiation exposure and sun holidays abroad.
Matti Narkia

High Tofu Intake Is Associated with Worse Memory in Elderly Indonesian Men and Women - 0 views

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    High tofu intake is associated with worse memory in elderly Indonesian men and women.
    Hogervorst E, Sadjimim T, Yesufu A, Kreager P, Rahardjo TB.
    Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2008;26(1):50-7. Epub 2008 Jun 27.
    PMID: 18583909
    DOI: 10.1159/000141484

    CONCLUSION: The results for tofu consumption as a risk factor for low memory function may tie in with the Honolulu Asia Aging Study data. It is unclear whether these negative associations could be attributed to potential toxins or to its phytoestrogen levels. Estrogen (through which receptors phytoestrogens can exert effects) was found to increase dementia risk in women over 65 years of age. Tempe contains high levels of phytoestrogens, but (due to fermentation) also exhibits high folate levels which may exert protective effects. Future studies should validate these findings and investigate potential mechanisms.
Matti Narkia

The Heart Scan Blog: Small LDL: Perfect index of carbohydrate intake - 0 views

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    "Measuring the number of small LDL particles is the best index of carbohydrate intake I know of, better than even blood sugar and triglycerides.

    In other words, increase carbohydrate intake and small LDL particles increase. Decrease carbohydrates and small LDL particles decrease.

    Why?

    Carbohydrates increase small LDL via a multistep process:

    First step: Increased fatty acid and apoprotein B production in the liver, which leads to increased VLDL production. (Apoprotein B is the principal protein of VLDL and LDL)

    Second step: Greater VLDL availability causes triglyceride-rich VLDL to interact with other particles, namely LDL and HDL, enriching them in triglycerides (via the action of cholesteryl-ester transfer protein, or CETP). Much VLDL is converted to LDL.

    Third step: Triglyceride-rich LDL is "remodeled" by enzymes like hepatic lipase, which create small LDL"
Matti Narkia

Vitamin K content of foods and dietary vitamin K intake in Japanese young women. J Nutr... - 0 views

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    Vitamin K content of foods and dietary vitamin K intake in Japanese young women.
    Kamao M, Suhara Y, Tsugawa N, Uwano M, Yamaguchi N, Uenishi K, Ishida H, Sasaki S, Okano T.
    J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 2007 Dec;53(6):464-70.
    PMID: 18202532

    Several reports indicate an important role for vitamin K in bone health as well as blood coagulation. However, the current Adequate Intakes (AI) might not be sufficient for the maintenance of bone health. To obtain a closer estimate of dietary intake of phylloquinone (PK) and menaquinones (MKs), PK, MK-4 and MK-7 contents in food samples (58 food items) were determined by an improved high-performance liquid chromatography method. Next, we assessed dietary vitamin K intake in young women living in eastern Japan using vitamin K contents measured here and the Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan. PK was widely distributed in green vegetables and algae, and high amounts were found in spinach and broccoli (raw, 498 and 307 microg/100 g wet weight, respectively). Although MK-4 was widely distributed in animal products, overall MK-4 content was lower than PK. MK-7 was observed characteristically in fermented soybean products such as natto (939 microg/100 g). The mean total vitamin K intake of all subjects (using data from this study and Japanese food composition tables) was about 230 microg/d and 94% of participants met the AI of vitamin K for women aged 18-29 y in Japan, 60 microg/d. The contributions of PK, MK-4 and MK-7 to total vitamin K intake were 67.7, 7.3 and 24.9%, respectively. PK from vegetables and algae and MK-7 from pulses (including fermented soybean foods) were the major contributors to the total vitamin K intake of young women living in eastern Japan
Matti Narkia

Fatty fish and fish omega-3 fatty acid intakes decrease the breast cancer risk: a case-... - 0 views

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    Fatty fish and fish omega-3 fatty acid intakes decrease the breast cancer risk: a case-control study.
    Kim J, Lim SY, Shin A, Sung MK, Ro J, Kang HS, Lee KS, Kim SW, Lee ES.
    BMC Cancer. 2009 Jun 30;9:216.
    PMID: 19566923
    doi: 10.1186/1471-2407-9-216

    Conclusion
    These results suggest that high consumption of fatty fish is associated with a reduced risk for breast cancer, and that the intake of omega-3 fatty acids from fish is inversely associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk
Matti Narkia

A comparison of egg consumption with other modifiable coronary heart disease lifestyle ... - 0 views

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    A comparison of egg consumption with other modifiable coronary heart disease lifestyle risk factors: a relative risk apportionment study.
    Barraj L, Tran N, Mink P.
    Risk Anal. 2009 Mar;29(3):401-15. Epub 2008 Nov 4.
    PMID: 19000074
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1539-6924.2008.01149.x

    Guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that healthy adults limit their intake of dietary cholesterol to less than 300 mg per day. Since a large egg contains about 71% of that amount, the AHA recommends restricting egg consumption unless dietary cholesterol intakes from other sources are limited. We applied a risk apportionment approach to estimate the contribution of egg consumption and other modifiable lifestyle risk factors (e.g., smoking, poor diet, minimal exercise, and alcohol intake) to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk at the population level. Specifically, we categorized the U.S. adult population ages 25+ into distinct risk groups based on the prevalence of modifiable lifestyle risk factors and applied an apportionment model, typically used to assess risk contribution at the individual level, to estimate the contribution of egg intake to CHD risk. Our analysis shows that the combination of modifiable lifestyle risk factors accounts for less than 40% of the population CHD mortality. For the majority of U.S. adults age 25+, consuming one egg a day accounts for <1% of CHD risk. Hence, focusing on decreasing egg intake as an approach to modify CHD risk would be expected to yield minimal results relative to changing other behaviors such as smoking and other dietary habits.
Matti Narkia

Meat, eggs, dairy products, and risk of breast cancer in the European Prospective Inves... - 0 views

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    Meat, eggs, dairy products, and risk of breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.
    Pala V, Krogh V, Berrino F, Sieri S, Grioni S, Tjønneland A, Olsen A, Jakobsen MU, Overvad K, Clavel-Chapelon F, Boutron-Ruault MC, Romieu I, Linseisen J, Rohrmann S, Boeing H, Steffen A, Trichopoulou A, Benetou V, Naska A, Vineis P, Tumino R, Panico S, Masala G, Agnoli C, Engeset D, Skeie G, Lund E, Ardanaz E, Navarro C, Sánchez MJ, Amiano P, Svatetz CA, Rodriguez L, Wirfält E, Manjer J, Lenner P, Hallmans G, Peeters PH, van Gils CH, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, van Duijnhoven FJ, Key TJ, Spencer E, Bingham S, Khaw KT, Ferrari P, Byrnes G, Rinaldi S, Norat T, Michaud DS, Riboli E.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Sep;90(3):602-12. Epub 2009 Jun 2.
    PMID: 19491385
    doi:10.3945/ajcn.2008.27173

    Conclusions: We have not consistently identified intakes of meat, eggs, or dairy products as risk factors for breast cancer. Future studies should investigate the possible role of high-temperature cooking in the relation of red meat intake with breast cancer risk.
Matti Narkia

Meat and egg consumption and risk of breast cancer among Chinese women. - Cancer Causes... - 0 views

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    Meat and egg consumption and risk of breast cancer among Chinese women.
    Zhang CX, Ho SC, Chen YM, Lin FY, Fu JH, Cheng SZ.
    Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Jun 17. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19533390

    Conclusions This study suggested that processed meat intake was associated with a possible increased risk of breast cancer. There was no significant association between consumption of total and red meat, poultry, fish, or egg with breast cancer risk
Matti Narkia

Consumption of 2 and 4 egg yolks/d for 5 wk increases macular pigment concentrations in... - 0 views

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    Consumption of 2 and 4 egg yolks/d for 5 wk increases macular pigment concentrations in older adults with low macular pigment taking cholesterol-lowering statins.
    Vishwanathan R, Goodrow-Kotyla EF, Wooten BR, Wilson TA, Nicolosi RJ.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Nov;90(5):1272-9. Epub 2009 Sep 16.
    PMID: 19759170

    Conclusions: Consumption of 4 egg yolks/d, and possibly of 2 egg yolks/d, for 5 wk benefited macular health in older adults with low MPOD. Serum HDL cholesterol increased without an increase in LDL cholesterol in this study population, most of whom were taking cholesterol-lowering statins.
Matti Narkia

Egg consumption, serum cholesterol, and cause-specific and all-cause mortality: the Nat... - 0 views

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    Egg consumption, serum cholesterol, and cause-specific and all-cause mortality: the National Integrated Project for Prospective Observation of Non-communicable Disease and Its Trends in the Aged, 1980 (NIPPON DATA80).
    Nakamura Y, Okamura T, Tamaki S, Kadowaki T, Hayakawa T, Kita Y, Okayama A, Ueshima H; NIPPON DATA80 Research Group.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jul;80(1):58-63.
    PMID: 15213028

    Results: The subjects were categorized into 5 egg consumption groups on the basis of their responses to a questionnaire (≥2/d, 1/d, 1/2 d, 1-2/wk, and seldom). There were 69, 1396, 1667, 1742, and 315 women in each of the 5 groups, respectively. Age-adjusted total cholesterol (5.21, 5.04, 4.95, 4.91, and 4.92 mmol/L in the 5 egg consumption categories, respectively) was related to egg consumption (P < 0.0001, analysis of covariance). In women, unadjusted IHD mortality and all-cause mortality differed significantly between the groups [IHD mortality: 1.1, 0.5, 0.4, 0.5, and 2.0 per 1000 person-years, respectively (P = 0.008, chi-square test); all-cause mortality: 14.8, 8.0, 7.5, 7.5, and 14.5 per 1000 person-years, respectively (P < 0.0001, chi-square test)]. In men, egg consumption was not related to age-adjusted total cholesterol. Cox analysis found that, in women, all-cause mortality in the 1-2-eggs/wk group was significantly lower than that in the 1-egg/d group, whereas no such relations were noted in men.

    Conclusion: Limiting egg consumption may have some health benefits, at least in women in geographic areas where egg consumption makes a relatively large contribution to total dietary cholesterol intake.
Matti Narkia

Egg consumption in relation to cardiovascular disease and mortality: the Phys... - 0 views

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    Egg consumption in relation to cardiovascular disease and mortality: the Physicians' Health Study.
    Djoussé L, Gaziano JM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):964-9.
    PMID: 18400720

    Results: In an average follow-up of 20 y, 1550 new myocardial infarctions (MIs), 1342 incident strokes, and 5169 deaths occurred. Egg consumption was not associated with incident MI or stroke in a multivariate Cox regression. In contrast, adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) for mortality were 1.0 (reference), 0.94 (0.87, 1.02), 1.03 (0.95, 1.11), 1.05 (0.93, 1.19), and 1.23 (1.11, 1.36) for the consumption of <1, 1>< 0.0001). This association was stronger among diabetic subjects, in whom the risk of death in a comparison of the highest with the lowest category of egg consumption was twofold (hazard ratio: 2.01; 95% CI: 1.26, 3.20; P for interaction = 0.09).

    Conclusions: Infrequent egg consumption does not seem to influence the risk of CVD in male physicians. In addition, egg consumption was positively related to mortality, more strongly so in diabetic subjects, in the study population.
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