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Matti Narkia

Overview and perspective in human nutrition. Willett WC. - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008; - 0 views

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    Overview and perspective in human nutrition.
    Willett WC.
    Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17 Suppl 1:1-4. Review.
    PMID: 18296289

    For the last decade, the focus of nutritional advice for prevention of chronic disease has been to limit or reduce
    total fat intake and to consume large amounts of carbohydrate. However, this advice is inconsistent with many
    lines of evidence indicating that unsaturated fats have beneficial metabolic effects and reduce risk of coronary
    heart disease. More recent evidence has also shown that the large majority of carbohydrates in Western diets,
    consisting of refined starches and sugars, have adverse metabolic effects and increase risks of coronary heart
    disease and type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, a major opportunity for health improvement has been lost by failing
    to distinguish healthy from unhealthy forms of carbohydrates and fats. Recent analyses indicate that moderate
    changes in diet, together with regular physical activity and not smoking, can prevent the large majority of heart
    disease, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer. These findings have substantial relevance for many populations
    in Asia, where incidence of type 2 diabetes is rising rapidly.
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Mercury and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Men - 0 views

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    Mercury and the risk of coronary heart disease in men.
    Yoshizawa K, Rimm EB, Morris JS, Spate VL, Hsieh CC, Spiegelman D, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC.
    N Engl J Med. 2002 Nov 28;347(22):1755-60.
    PMID: 12456851

    Conclusions Our findings do not support an association between total mercury exposure and the risk of coronary heart disease, but a weak relation cannot be ruled out.
Matti Narkia

Benefit-risk assessment of vitamin D supplementation. - Osteoporos Int. 2009 Dec 3. - S... - 0 views

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    Benefit-risk assessment of vitamin D supplementation.
    Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Shao A, Dawson-Hughes B, Hathcock J, Giovannucci E, Willett WC.
    Osteoporos Int. 2009 Dec 3. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19957164

    Conclusion Our analysis suggests that mean serum 25(OH)D levels of about 75 to 110 nmol/l provide optimal benefits for all investigated endpoints without increasing health risks. These levels can be best obtained with oral doses in the range of 1,800 to 4,000 IU vitamin D per day; further work is needed, including subject and environment factors, to better define the doses that will achieve optimal blood levels in the large majority of the population.
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Low-Carbohydrate-Diet Score and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women - 0 views

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    Low-carbohydrate-diet score and the risk of coronary heart disease in women.
    Halton TL, Willett WC, Liu S, Manson JE, Albert CM, Rexrode K, Hu FB.
    N Engl J Med. 2006 Nov 9;355(19):1991-2002.
    PMID: 17093250

    Conclusions Our findings suggest that diets lower in carbohydrate and higher in protein and fat are not associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease in women. When vegetable sources of fat and protein are chosen, these diets may moderately reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.
Matti Narkia

Types of Dietary Fat and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A Critical Review -- Hu et al.... - 0 views

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    Types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a critical review.
    Hu FB, Manson JE, Willett WC.
    J Am Coll Nutr. 2001 Feb;20(1):5-19. Review.
    PMID: 11293467
Matti Narkia

JAMA -- A Prospective Study of Egg Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Me... - 0 views

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    A prospective study of egg consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease in men and women.
    Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Rimm EB, Manson JE, Ascherio A, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, Spiegelman D, Speizer FE, Sacks FM, Hennekens CH, Willett WC.
    JAMA. 1999 Apr 21;281(15):1387-94.
    PMID: 10217054

    Results We documented 866 incident cases of CHD and 258 incident cases of stroke in men during 8 years of follow-up and 939 incident cases of CHD and 563 incident cases of stroke in women during 14 years of follow-up. After adjustment for age, smoking, and other potential CHD risk factors, we found no evidence of an overall significant association between egg consumption and risk of CHD or stroke in either men or women. The relative risks (RRs) of CHD across categories of intake were less than 1 per week (1.0), 1 per week (1.06), 2 to 4 per week (1.12), 5 to 6 per week (0.90), and >=1 per day (1.08) (P for trend=.75) for men; and less than 1 per week (1.0), 1 per week (0.82), 2 to 4 per week (0.99), 5 to 6 per week (0.95), and >=1 per day (0.82) (P for trend=.95) for women. In subgroup analyses, higher egg consumption appeared to be associated with increased risk of CHD only among diabetic subjects (RR of CHD comparing more than 1 egg per day with less than 1 egg per week among diabetic men, 2.02 [95% confidence interval, 1.05-3.87; P for trend=.04], and among diabetic women, 1.49 [0.88-2.52; P for trend=.008]).

    Conclusions These findings suggest that consumption of up to 1 egg per day is unlikely to have substantial overall impact on the risk of CHD or stroke among healthy men and women. The apparent increased risk of CHD associated with higher egg consumption among diabetic participants warrants further research.
Matti Narkia

{alpha}-Linolenic Acid and Risk of Nonfatal Acute Myocardial Infarction -- Campos et al... - 0 views

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    Alpha-linolenic acid and risk of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction.
    Campos H, Baylin A, Willett WC.
    Circulation. 2008 Jul 22;118(4):339-45. Epub 2008 Jul 7. Erratum in: Circulation. 2008 Sep 16;118(12):e492.
    PMID: 18606916
    doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.762419

    Conclusions - Consumption of vegetable oils rich in {alpha}-linolenic acid could confer important cardiovascular protection. The apparent protective effect of {alpha}-linolenic acid is most evident among subjects with low intakes.
Matti Narkia

Fatty acid intake and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in US women - 0 views

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    Fatty acid intake and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in U.S. women.
    Alperovich M, Neuman MI, Willett WC, Curhan GC.
    Nutrition. 2007 Mar;23(3):196-202. Epub 2007 Jan 22.
    PMID: 17236748
    doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2006.11.007.

    Conclusions
    Fatty acid intake may affect the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in young and middle-aged women. Higher dietary intake of palmitic acid and possibly DHA and EPA may increase the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in women while higher oleic acid intake may decrease the risk.
Matti Narkia

GrassrootsHealth | Vitamin D Action - Vitamin D Scientists' Call to Action Statement - 0 views

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    "We are aware of substantial scientific evidence supporting the role of vitamin D in prevention of cancer. It has been reasonably established that adequate serum vitamin D metabolite levels are associated with substantially lower incidence rates of several types of cancer, including those of the breast, colon, and ovary, and other sites.

    We have concluded that the vitamin D status of most individuals in North America will need to be greatly improved for substantial reduction in incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that higher vitamin D levels are also associated with lower risk of Type I diabetes in children and of multiple sclerosis. Several studies have found that markers of higher vitamin D levels are associated with lower incidence and severity of influenza and several other infectious diseases."
Matti Narkia

Review of fat and fatty acid requirements and criteria for developing dietary guideline... - 0 views

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    Review of fat and fatty acid requirements and criteria for developing dietary guidelines.
    Smit LA, Mozaffarian D, Willett W.
    Ann Nutr Metab. 2009;55(1-3):44-55. Epub 2009 Sep 15.
    PMID: 19752535
    DOI: 10.1159/000228995
Matti Narkia

Prospective Study of Predictors of Vitamin D Status and Cancer Incidence and Mortality ... - 0 views

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    Prospective study of predictors of vitamin D status and cancer incidence and mortality in men.
    Giovannucci E, Liu Y, Rimm EB, Hollis BW, Fuchs CS, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC.
    J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Apr 5;98(7):451-9.
    PMID: 16595781
    doi:10.1093/jnci/djj101

    Conclusions: Low levels of vitamin D may be associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality in men, particularly for digestive-system cancers. The vitamin D supplementation necessary to achieve a 25(OH)D increment of 25 nmol/L may be at least 1500 IU/day.
Matti Narkia

Cod liver oil, vitamin A toxicity, frequent respiratory infections, and the vitamin D d... - 0 views

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    Cod liver oil, vitamin A toxicity, frequent respiratory infections, and the vitamin D deficiency epidemic.
    Cannell JJ, Vieth R, Willett W, Zasloff M, Hathcock JN, White JH, Tanumihardjo SA, Larson-Meyer DE, Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Lamberg-Allardt CJ, Lappe JM, Norman AW, Zittermann A, Whiting SJ, Grant WB, Hollis BW, Giovannucci E.
    Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2008 Nov;117(11):864-70. Review.
    PMID: 19102134

    Until we have better information on doses of vitamin D that will reliably provide adequate blood levels of
    25(OH)D without toxicity, treatment of vitamin D deficiency in otherwise healthy children should be individualized
    according to the numerous factors that affect 25(OH)D levels, such as body weight, percent body fat,
    skin melanin, latitude, season of the year, and sun exposure.2 The doses of sunshine or oral vitamin D3 used
    in healthy children should be designed to maintain 25(OH)D levels above 50 ng/mL. As a rule, in the absence
    of significant sun exposure, we believe that most healthy children need about 1,000 IU of vitamin D3 daily
    per 11 kg (25 lb) of body weight to obtain levels greater than 50 ng/mL. Some will need more, and others less.
    In our opinion, children with chronic illnesses such as autism, diabetes, and/or frequent infections should be
    supplemented with higher doses of sunshine or vitamin D3, doses adequate to maintain their 25(OH)D levels
    in the mid-normal of the reference range (65 ng/mL) - and should be so supplemented year round. Otolaryngologists
    treating children are in a good position to both diagnose and treat vitamin D deficiency.
Matti Narkia

Prospective study of predictors of vitamin D status and survival in patients with color... - 0 views

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    Prospective study of predictors of vitamin D status and survival in patients with colorectal cancer
    K Ng, B M Wolpin, J A Meyerhardt, K Wu, A T Chan, B W Hollis, E L Giovannucci, M J Stampfer, W C Willett and C S Fuchs
    Br J Cancer 101: 916-923; advance online publication, August 18, 2009; doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605262
Matti Narkia

Evidence-based decision making on micronutrients and chronic disease: long-term randomi... - 0 views

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    Evidence-based decision making on micronutrients and chronic disease: long-term randomized controlled trials are not enough.
    Ames BN, McCann JC, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Aug;86(2):522-3; author reply 523-4.
    PMID: 17684228
Matti Narkia

JAMA -- Fracture Prevention With Vitamin D Supplementation: A Meta-analysis of Randomiz... - 0 views

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    Fracture prevention with vitamin D supplementation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
    Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, Giovannucci E, Dietrich T, Dawson-Hughes B.
    JAMA. 2005 May 11;293(18):2257-64. Review.
    PMID: 15886381

    Conclusions Oral vitamin D supplementation between 700 to 800 IU/d appears to reduce the risk of hip and any nonvertebral fractures in ambulatory or institutionalized elderly persons. An oral vitamin D dose of 400 IU/d is not sufficient for fracture prevention.
Matti Narkia

Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 ... - 0 views

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    Conclusion: The associations suggest that replacing SFAs with PUFAs rather than MUFAs or carbohydrates prevents CHD over a wide range of intakes.

    Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies.
    Jakobsen MU, O'Reilly EJ, Heitmann BL, Pereira MA, Bälter K, Fraser GE, Goldbourt U, Hallmans G, Knekt P, Liu S, Pietinen P, Spiegelman D, Stevens J, Virtamo J, Willett WC, Ascherio A.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 May;89(5):1425-32. Epub 2009 Feb 11.
    PMID: 19211817
    doi:10.3945/ajcn.2008.27124
Matti Narkia

Prevention of Nonvertebral Fractures With Oral Vitamin D and Dose Dependency: A Meta-an... - 0 views

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    Prevention of nonvertebral fractures with oral vitamin D and dose dependency: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
    Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, Stuck AE, Staehelin HB, Orav EJ, Thoma A, Kiel DP, Henschkowski J.
    Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 23;169(6):551-61.
    PMID: 19307517

    Conclusion Nonvertebral fracture prevention with vitamin D is dose dependent, and a higher dose should reduce fractures by at least 20% for individuals aged 65 years or older.
Matti Narkia

A nested case control study of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of co... - 0 views

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    A nested case control study of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer.
    Wu K, Feskanich D, Fuchs CS, Willett WC, Hollis BW, Giovannucci EL.
    J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Jul 18;99(14):1120-9. Epub 2007 Jul 10.
    PMID: 17623801
Matti Narkia

The urgent need to recommend an intake of vitamin D that is effective -- Vieth et al. 8... - 0 views

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    Vieth R, Bischoff-Ferrari H, Boucher BJ, Dawson-Hughes B, Garland CF, Heaney RP, Holick MF, Hollis BW, Lamberg-Allardt C, McGrath JJ, Norman AW, Scragg R, Whiting SJ, Willett WC, Zittermann A. \nThe urgent need to recommend an intake of vitamin D that is
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