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Matti Narkia

Quantitative Analysis of the Benefits and Risks of Consuming Farmed and Wild Salmon -- ... - 0 views

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    Quantitative analysis of the benefits and risks of consuming farmed and wild salmon.
    Foran JA, Good DH, Carpenter DO, Hamilton MC, Knuth BA, Schwager SJ.
    J Nutr. 2005 Nov;135(11):2639-43.
    PMID: 16251623

    Contaminants in farmed Atlantic and wild Pacific salmon raise important questions about the competing health benefits and risks of fish consumption. A benefit-risk analysis was conducted to compare quantitatively the cancer and noncancer risks of exposure to organic contaminants in salmon with the (n-3) fatty acid-associated health benefits of salmon consumption. Recommended levels of (n-3) fatty acid intake, as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may be achieved by consuming farmed or wild salmon while maintaining an acceptable level of noncarcinogenic risk. However, the recommended level of EPA+DHA intake cannot be achieved solely from farmed or wild salmon while maintaining an acceptable level of carcinogenic risk. Although the benefit-risk ratio for carcinogens and noncarcinogens is significantly greater for wild Pacific salmon than for farmed Atlantic salmon as a group, the ratio for some subgroups of farmed salmon is on par with the ratio for wild salmon. This analysis suggests that risk of exposure to contaminants in farmed and wild salmon is partially offset by the fatty acid-associated health benefits. However, young children, women of child-bearing age, pregnant women, and nursing mothers not at significant risk for sudden cardiac death associated with CHD but concerned with health impairments such as reduction in IQ and other cognitive and behavioral effects, can minimize contaminant exposure by choosing the least contaminated wild salmon or by selecting other sources of (n-3) fatty acids.
Matti Narkia

Long-term consumption of a carbohydrate-restricted diet does not induce deleterious met... - 0 views

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    Long-term consumption of a carbohydrate-restricted diet does not induce deleterious metabolic effects.
    Grieb P, K?apcin'ska B, Smol E, Pilis T, Pilis W, Sadowska-Krepa E, Sobczak A, Bartoszewicz Z, Nauman J, Stan'czak K, Langfort J.
    Nutr Res. 2008 Dec;28(12):825-33.
    PMID: 19083495
    doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2008.09.011

    These results indicate that long-term (>1 year) compliance with a low-CHO high-fat "optimal diet" does not induce deleterious metabolic effects and does not increase the risk for cardiovascular disease, as evidenced by maintenance of adequate glycemic control and relatively low values for conventional cardiovascular risk factors.
Matti Narkia

Efficacy and safety of berberine for congestive heart failure secondary to ischemic or ... - 1 views

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    Efficacy and safety of berberine for congestive heart failure secondary to ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.
    Zeng XH, Zeng XJ, Li YY.
    Am J Cardiol. 2003 Jul 15;92(2):173-6.
    PMID: 12860219
    doi:10.1016/S0002-9149(03)00533-2

    Thus, berberine improved quality of life and decreased VPCs and mortality in patients with CHF.
Matti Narkia

Efficacy of Berberine in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes - 0 views

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    Efficacy of berberine in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
    Yin J, Xing H, Ye J.
    Metabolism. 2008 May;57(5):712-7.
    PMID: 18442638
    doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2008.01.013.

    Fasting plasma insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index were reduced by 28.1% and 44.7% (P<.001), respectively. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased significantly as well. During the trial, 20 (34.5%) patients experienced transient gastrointestinal adverse effects. Functional liver or kidney damages were not observed for all patients. In conclusion, this pilot study indicates that berberine is a potent oral hypoglycemic agent with beneficial effects on lipid metabolism

    In summary, that berberine is a potent oral hypoglycemic agent with modest effect on lipid metabolism. It is safe and the cost of treatment by berberine is very low. It may serve as a new drug candidate in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, this is a pilot study. The efficacy of berberine needs to be tested in a much larger population and characterized as a function of the known duration of the diabetes. Further studies are needed to evaluate the action of berberine on type 2 diabetes in other ethnic groups.
Matti Narkia

Berberine: a plant alkaloid with therapeutic potential for central nervous system disor... - 0 views

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    Berberine: a plant alkaloid with therapeutic potential for central nervous system disorders.
    Kulkami SK et al.
    Phytotherapy Research, Published Online: 8 Dec 2009

    This review attempts to discuss the pharmacological basis of the use of berberine in various central nervous system
    and related disorders. Its protective effect in Alzheimer's, cerebral ischemia, mental depression, schizophrenia
    and anxiety are highlighted. However, more detailed clinical trials along with a safety assessment of berberine
    are warranted for positioning the alkaloid in the treatment of neurological disorders.
Matti Narkia

A preliminary study of the safety, feasibility and cognitive efficacy of soy isoflavone... - 0 views

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    A preliminary study of the safety, feasibility and cognitive efficacy of soy isoflavone supplements in older men and women.
    Gleason CE, Carlsson CM, Barnet JH, Meade SA, Setchell KD, Atwood CS, Johnson SC, Ries ML, Asthana S.
    Age Ageing. 2009 Jan;38(1):86-93. Epub 2008 Dec 2.
    PMID: 19054783
    doi:10.1093/ageing/afn227

    Conclusions: these data suggest that administration of 100 mg/day of isoflavones was well tolerated. Plasma genistein and daidzein levels, but not equol, increased with isoflavone administration. Finally, data support the potential cognitive effects of soy isoflavones in older adults.
Matti Narkia

JAMA -- Soy Food Intake and Breast Cancer Survival, December 9, 2009, Shu et al. 302 (2... - 1 views

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    Soy Food Intake and Breast Cancer Survival.
    Xiao Ou Shu et al.
    JAMA Vol. 302 No. 22, December 9, 2009; 302(22):2437-2443.

    Results During the median follow-up of 3.9 years (range, 0.5-6.2 years), 444 deaths and 534 recurrences or breast cancer-related deaths were documented in 5033 surgically treated breast cancer patients. Soy food intake, as measured by either soy protein or soy isoflavone intake, was inversely associated with mortality and recurrence. The hazard ratio associated with the highest quartile of soy protein intake was 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.92) for total mortality and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.54-0.87) for recurrence compared with the lowest quartile of intake. The multivariate-adjusted 4-year mortality rates were 10.3% and 7.4%, and the 4-year recurrence rates were 11.2% and 8.0%, respectively, for women in the lowest and highest quartiles of soy protein intake. The inverse association was evident among women with either estrogen receptor-positive or -negative breast cancer and was present in both users and nonusers of tamoxifen.

    Conclusion Among women with breast cancer, soy food consumption was significantly associated with decreased risk of death and recurrence.
Matti Narkia

Study: Eating Soy Is Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors - TIME - 0 views

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    "The common culprit is soy, a plant that contains chemicals with estrogen-like and anti-estrogenic properties - making it a nutritional minefield for breast cancer survivors. While Western diets are relatively low in soy - compared with the typical diet in Asia, where people eat soy daily - the percentage of Americans consuming soy at least once a week has increased from 15% in 1997 to 28% in 2003. In the meantime, studies on the effect of soy on breast cancer recurrence and mortality have been conflicting, with some showing that it can reduce risk, while others show an elevated rate of recurrent disease among high soy consumers.

    Now the largest study to date of soy's effect on breast cancer suggests that eating soy, even in large amounts, may not be harmful after all, and may even reduce recurrence and death from the disease. But while the findings are intriguing, not all doctors are ready to tout the benefits of tofu
Matti Narkia

Goldenseal, Berberine : Safety - 0 views

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    "Possible effects of berberine, a chemical found in small amounts in goldenseal, include headache, slow heart rate, nausea, vomiting, abdominal bloating, and low white blood cell count. It is not clear if the amount of berberine in goldenseal products is enough to cause these reactions. Toxic doses of berberine may cause seizures or irritation of the esophagus and stomach when taken by mouth. Berberine used intravenously (through the veins) may cause abnormal heart rhythms. Based on laboratory and animal studies, berberine may increase blood concentrations of bilirubin. Berberine theoretically may cause low blood pressure, although a different chemical in goldenseal, hydrastine, may actually cause increased blood pressure. There is limited study of the blood pressure effects of these agents in humans.

    Based on laboratory and animal studies, the use of goldenseal or berberine could increase the risk of bleeding. However, there are no reliable published reports of bleeding in humans. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

    Based on an initial report, goldenseal or berberine may cause increased sun sensitivity, although this is not a commonly reported symptom.

    Based on laboratory studies, berberine may lower blood sugar. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Serum glucose levels may need to be monitored by a healthcare provider, and medication adjustments may be necessary. "
Matti Narkia

Huanglian - Sloan-Kettering - 0 views

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    "Derived from the root of the plant. This supplement is used in traditional Chinese medicine primarily for gastrointestinal complaints, diarrhea, hypertension, bacterial and viral infections. Berberine and berberine-like alkaloids are thought responsible for its activity (1). Laboratory studies indicate that berberine induces morphological changes and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in hepatoma cancer cells (3). Preliminary data support the hypothesis that huanglian suppresses cyclin B1 protein and causes cell cycle arrest at G2 (5). Huanglian has potent antiangiogenesis activity (6). It also interacts with acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors and inhibits cholinesterase. Possible adverse effects include nausea and vomiting (1). Theoretically huanglian may have additive hypotensive effects with antihypertensive agents. A phase I dose escalation study of huanglian in solid tumors is currently underway at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center based on"
Matti Narkia

Why governments are selling Vitamin D short - FT.com / Reportage - - 0 views

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    "So why is Dr Vieth so frustrated? You might think he'd have cause for celebration. But for him and other vitamin D researchers around the world, the good news comes with a bitter aftertaste. They believe they can prove vitamin D could help millions live longer and be healthier and yet they have not been able to convince their own governments.

    In the US and Canada, official vitamin D policy is set by the Institute of Medicine. And in the opinion of Vieth, the current recommendations - 200 International Units per day for people under 50, 400 for people aged 51-70, and 600 for those 71 and older - are outrageously low. Bruce Hollis, professor of paediatrics at the Medical University of South Carolina, calls 400 IU a day "a joke". That's because the best research suggests that to achieve the higher vitamin D blood levels associated with disease prevention, most adults in the US would need to take 1,000-2,000 IU a day: five to 10 times more than the current official recommendation for adult

    In 1999, Reinhold Vieth (pictured right) published a review of vitamin D research in response to the IOM conclusions. In it, he argued that there was no evidence that amounts lower than 20,000 IU a day could be toxic. "Throughout my preparation of this review, I was amazed at the lack of evidence supporting statements about the toxicity of moderate doses of vitamin D," Vieth wrote.

    Studies have since shown 10,000 IU a day of vitamin D to be safe. While any substance will become toxic in excess, vitamin D researchers today accept that the current vitamin D recommendations could be more than quadrupled with no fear of toxicity.!
Matti Narkia

Berberine, dosing and safety - wellness.com - 0 views

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    Side Effects and Warnings
    Berberine has been reported to cause nausea, vomiting, hypertension (high blood pressure), respiratory failure and paresthesias (abnormal sensations such as numbness or tingling); however, clinical evidence of such adverse effects is not prominent in the literature. Rare adverse effects including headache, skin irritation, facial flushing, headache, bradycardia (slowed heart rate) have also been reported with the use of berberine. Use cautiously when taking berberine for longer than eight weeks due to theoretical changes in bacterial gut flora.
    Use cautiously in individuals with diabetes, as both human and animal studies indicate that berberine may decrease blood sugar levels. Also use cautiously in individuals with hypotension (low blood pressure), as berberine may have antihypertensive effects.
    Patients with cardiovascular disease should also use caution as berberine has been associated with the development of ventricular arrhythmias in subjects with congestive heart failure.
    Although not well studied in humans, berberine may also theoretically cause delays in small intestinal transit time or increase the risk of bleeding.
    Berberine may cause abortion, eye or kidney irritation, nephritis (inflamed kidneys), dyspnea (difficulty breathing), flu-like symptoms, giddiness, lethargy, or liver toxicity.
    Patients with leukopenia (abnormally low white blood cell count) should use cautiously due to the potential for development of leukopenia symptoms.
    When injected under the skin, berberine may cause hyperpigmentation in the arm. Use berberine cautiously in individuals with high exposure to sunlight or artificial light due to potential for adverse phototoxic reactions.
    Avoid in newborns due to potential for increase in free bilirubin, jaundice, and development of kernicterus (brain damage caused by severe newborn jaundice). Use berberine cautiously in children due to a lack of safety information.
    Pregnancy and Breastfeeding
    Berberine is not recomme
Matti Narkia

Developmental toxicity evaluation of berberine in rats and mice. Gloria D. Jahnke. 2006... - 0 views

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    Developmental toxicity evaluation of berberine in rats and mice.
    Jahnke GD, Price CJ, Marr MC, Myers CB, George JD.
    Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2006 Jun;77(3):195-206.
    PMID: 16634078
    DOI: 10.1002/bdrb.20075

    BACKGROUND: Berberine, a plant alkaloid, is found in some herbal teas and health-related products. It is a component of goldenseal, an herbal supplement. Berberine chloride dihydrate (BCD) was evaluated for developmental toxicity in rats and mice.
    METHODS: Berberine chloride dihydrate was administered in the feed to timed-mated Sprague-Dawley (CD) rats (0, 3625, 7250, or 14,500 ppm; on gestational days [GD] 6-20), and Swiss Albino (CD-1) mice (0, 3500, 5250, or 7000 ppm; on GD 6-17). Ingested doses were 0, 282, 531, and 1313 mg/kg/day (rats) and 0, 569, 841, and 1155 mg/kg/day (mice).
    RESULTS:There were no maternal deaths. The rat maternal lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL), based on reduced maternal weight gain, was 7250 ppm. The rat developmental toxicity LOAEL, based on reduced fetal body weight per litter, was 14,500 ppm. In the mouse study, equivocal maternal and developmental toxicity LOAELs were 5250 ppm. Due to scattering of feed in the high dose groups, a gavage study at 1000 mg/kg/day was conducted in both species.
    CONCLUSIONS: In rats, maternal, but not fetal adverse effects were noted. The maternal toxicity LOAEL remained at 7250 ppm (531 mg/kg/day) based on the feed study and the developmental toxicity NOAEL was raised to 1000 mg/kg/day BCD based on the gavage study. In the mouse, 33% of the treated females died. Surviving animals had increased relative water intake, and average fetal body weight per litter decreased 5-6% with no change in live litter size. The maternal toxicity LOAEL remained at 5250 ppm (841 mg/kg/day) BCD, based on increased water consumption. The developmental toxicity LOAEL was raised to 1000 mg/kg/day BCD based on decreased fetal body weight.
Matti Narkia

Mechanisms of Berberine (Natural Yellow 18)-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Interact... - 0 views

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    Mechanisms of berberine (natural yellow 18)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction: interaction with the adenine nucleotide translocator.
    Pereira CV, Machado NG, Oliveira PJ.
    Toxicol Sci. 2008 Oct;105(2):408-17. Epub 2008 Jul 3.
    PMID: 18599498
    doi: 10.1124/jpet.107.128017

    The data from the present work appear to show that berberine also presents some degree of toxicity to "nontumor" systems, which should be carefully understood. ANT inhibition in nontumor cells by berberine would be responsible for a decrease in energy production and could also result in MPT induction. To the best of our knowledge, no full toxicity assessment exists for berberine in humans, although its use in several commercially available supplements suggests that the compound may present a relatively wide safety interval. In fact, a study with patients with congestive heart failure treated with 1.2 g/day of oral berberine revealed low toxicity and resulted into an average plasma concentration of 0.11 mg/l which would translate into 0.3µM (Zeng and Zeng, 1999Go). Repeated cumulative treatments, alternative forms of formulation (e.g., topical application vs. injection) or more importantly, active mitochondrial accumulation due to its positive charge would be expected to increase its concentration in cells into the range of concentrations used in this study.

    Empirical data from nontraditional medicines plus the use of extensive clinical assays would allow the use of berberine as a promising antimelanoma agent while maintaining its safety for humans. In radial/vertical forms of melanoma, a possible topical application of berberine would also be possible, thus minimizing side effects on other organs.

    In conclusion, the present work identifies the ANT as an important target for berberine, with clear relevance for its proposed antitumor effects.
Matti Narkia

Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation for 1 y does not prevent weight or body fat re... - 0 views

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    Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation for 1 y does not prevent weight or body fat regain.
    Larsen TM, Toubro S, Gudmundsen O, Astrup A.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Mar;83(3):606-12.
    PMID: 16522907

    CONCLUSION: A 3.4-g daily CLA supplementation for 1 y does not prevent weight or fat mass regain in a healthy obese population.
Matti Narkia

Health benefits of eating fish far outweigh risks from contaminants, report concludes -... - 0 views

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    October 17, 2006 | Steve Stiles
    Boston, MA - A review of the literature on the health effects of dietary fish or fish-oil intake has a reassuring message for seafood lovers, anyone eating fish for health reasons, and perhaps most everyone else [1]. Levels of mercury and other contaminants in commercially bought fish are low, and their potential risks are overwhelmed by likely reductions in cardiovascular mortality, according to a report in the October 18, 2006 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    "The main message is really that everybody should be eating one or two servings of fish or seafood per week for their health," Dr Dariush Mozaffarian (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA) told heartwire.

    In his analysis, coauthored with Dr Eric B Rimm (Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA), regular "modest" intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the two long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) abundant in finfish and shellfish (collectively referred to as "fish" in the article), is associated with a 36% drop in coronary disease mortality (p<0.001) and a 17>

    Those potential benefits are immense compared with the highly publicized but apparently low health risks associated with methylmercury, dioxins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that have been found in some fish species, they write. The evidence suggests a potential for neurodevelopmental deficits from early exposure to methylmercury, but the risk is likely diminished by limiting intake of fish with high methylmercur
Matti Narkia

A phase 2 trial exploring the effects of high-dose (10,000 IU/day) vitamin D(3) in brea... - 0 views

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    A phase 2 trial exploring the effects of high-dose (10,000 IU/day) vitamin D(3) in breast cancer patients with bone metastases.
    Amir E, Simmons CE, Freedman OC, Dranitsaris G, Cole DE, Vieth R, Ooi WS, Clemons M.
    Cancer. 2009 Nov 13. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19918922
    DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24749

    METHODS:
    Patients with bone metastases treated with bisphosphonates were enrolled into this single-arm phase 2 study. Patients received 10,000 IU of vitamin D3 and 1000 mg of calcium supplementation each day for 4 months. The effect of this treatment on palliation, bone resorption markers, calcium metabolism, and toxicity were evaluated at baseline and monthly thereafter.


    CONCLUSIONS:
    Daily doses of 10,000 IU vitamin D3 for 4 months appear safe in patients without comorbid conditions causing hypersensitivity to vitamin D. Treatment reduced inappropriately elevated parathyroid hormone levels, presumably caused by long-term bisphosphonate use. There did not appear to be a significant palliative benefit nor any significant change in bone resorption. Cancer 2010. © 2009 American Cancer Society.
Matti Narkia

High doses of vitamin D could cut relapse rate among MS sufferers - Times Online - 0 views

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    "Powerful new evidence about the ability of vitamin D to stem a wide range of diseases has brought the prospect of a nationwide programme to prescribe it in Scotland as a dietary supplement significantly closer.

    Reports at the weekend suggested that experts were increasingly convinced that the so-called sunshine drug - whose significance was first revealed in detail by The Times last year - could make a difference to the country's appalling health record.

    New research suggests that high doses of vitamin D could dramatically cut the relapse rate in people with multiple sclerosis. According to scientists in Canada, more than a third of sufferers taking high levels of supplement
Matti Narkia

Safety of vitamin D3 in adults with multiple sclerosis -- Kimball et al. 86 (3): 645 --... - 0 views

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    Safety of vitamin D3 in adults with multiple sclerosis.
    Kimball SM, Ursell MR, O'Connor P, Vieth R.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):645-51.
    PMID: 17823429

    Conclusions: Patients' serum 25(OH)D concentrations reached twice the top of the physiologic range without eliciting hypercalcemia or hypercalciuria. The data support the feasibility of pharmacologic doses of vitamin D3 for clinical research, and they provide objective evidence that vitamin D intake beyond the current upper limit is safe by a large margin.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D and MS: Burton - 0 views

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    "Dr. Jodie Burton is the acting principal investigator (PI) of the dose-escalation trial of oral vitamin D3 with calcium supplementation in patients with multiple sclerosis with Dr. O'Connor. She started the trial as his fellow, while doing an additional 2 years of training in MS specifically after she received her neurology certification. She completed her fellowship training in 2007. Now she is staff doing clinical research and continuing with the vitamin D trial. As of August 2009, she will be Assistant Professor in Neurology in the Department of Clinical Neuroscience in Calgary and at the University of Calgary. She will be part of the MS team there with Dr. Luanne Metz and the MS group.

    Please scroll down for an abstract of the trial:
    A Phase I/II dose-escalation trial of oral vitamin D3 with calcium supplementation in patients with multiple sclerosis."

    Conclusions:
    High-dose VD3 (~10 000 IU/day, possibly higher) in MS is safe and tolerable, with evidence of clinical improvement."
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