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Matti Narkia

Skepticblog » Still On That Low-Carb Diet - 1 views

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    "Still On That Low-Carb Diet
    by Steven Novella, Dec 14 2009

    I have never been a fan of the low-carb diet craze - Atkins, South Beach, or whatever version you prefer. To me this was always a triumph of marketing over science. It is also an excellent example of how public opinion can be largely swayed by a few proponents and a compliant media, while the science goes off unnoticed in a different direction."
Matti Narkia

Hyperlipid: Kwasniewski paper - 0 views

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    "A friend has emailed me the full text of Pawel Grieb's paper documenting a number of physiological parameters of medium to long term Optimal Diet (OD) eaters in Poland, as pointed out by Flo and Stan. There are a few points worth making. The biggest mistake, BTW, is that the authors claim (correctly) that the OD diet aims for >70% fat with (incorrectly) "no restriction on the type of fat (saturated or unsaturated) or cholesterol level". I think they meant that the OD does not ban saturated fats. This is of course true but the impression given is that the OD allows "healthy" fats, which are, of course, inedible. So the heavy emphasis on saturated fats is missed by the paper. A pity, anyone might be left thinking corn oil is a human food...

    The first positive aspect is that this is a multi author study, eleven authors from several medical centres/unversities. So it's not a one man band case report. I like that.

    The second is that it is remarkably positive about the findings throughout. Even the elevated LDL cholesterol levels are not taken as extreme and are not trumpeted from the rooftops as the portent of imminent cardiovascular doom. So refreshing!"
Matti Narkia

Long-term consumption of a carbohydrate-restricted diet does not induce deleterious met... - 0 views

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    Long-term consumption of a carbohydrate-restricted diet does not induce deleterious metabolic effects.
    Grieb P, K?apcin'ska B, Smol E, Pilis T, Pilis W, Sadowska-Krepa E, Sobczak A, Bartoszewicz Z, Nauman J, Stan'czak K, Langfort J.
    Nutr Res. 2008 Dec;28(12):825-33.
    PMID: 19083495
    doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2008.09.011

    These results indicate that long-term (>1 year) compliance with a low-CHO high-fat "optimal diet" does not induce deleterious metabolic effects and does not increase the risk for cardiovascular disease, as evidenced by maintenance of adequate glycemic control and relatively low values for conventional cardiovascular risk factors.
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Low-Carbohydrate-Diet Score and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women - 0 views

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    Low-carbohydrate-diet score and the risk of coronary heart disease in women.
    Halton TL, Willett WC, Liu S, Manson JE, Albert CM, Rexrode K, Hu FB.
    N Engl J Med. 2006 Nov 9;355(19):1991-2002.
    PMID: 17093250

    Conclusions Our findings suggest that diets lower in carbohydrate and higher in protein and fat are not associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease in women. When vegetable sources of fat and protein are chosen, these diets may moderately reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.
Matti Narkia

Dietary composition modulates brain mass and amyloid beta levels in a mouse model of ag... - 0 views

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    Dietary composition modulates brain mass and solubilizable Abeta levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology.
    Pedrini S, Thomas C, Brautigam H, Schmeidler J, Ho L, Fraser P, Westaway D, Hyslop PS, Martins RN, Buxbaum JD, Pasinetti GM, Dickstein DL, Hof PR, Ehrlich ME, Gandy S.
    Mol Neurodegener. 2009 Oct 21;4:40.
    PMID: 19845940
    doi:10.1186/1750-1326-4-40

    INTERPRETATION: Dissociation of Abeta changes from brain mass changes raises the possibility that diet plays a role not only in modulating amyloidosis but also in modulating neuronal vulnerability. However, in the absence of a study of the effects of a high protein/low carbohydrate diet on nontransgenic mice, one cannot be certain how much, if any, of the loss of brain mass exhibited by high protein/low carbohydrate diet-fed TgCRND8 mice was due to an interaction between cerebral amyloidosis and diet. Given the recent evidence that certain factors favor the maintenance of cognitive function in the face of substantial structural neuropathology, we propose that there might also exist factors that sensitize brain neurons to some forms of neurotoxicity, including, perhaps, amyloid neurotoxicity. Identification of these factors could help reconcile the poor clinicopathological correlation between cognitive status and structural neuropathology, including amyloid pathology.
Matti Narkia

A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease... - 0 views

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    A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.
    Van der Auwera I, Wera S, Van Leuven F, Henderson ST.
    Nutr Metab (Lond). 2005 Oct 17;2:28.
    PMID: 16229744
    doi:10.1186/1743-7075-2-28

    CONCLUSION: Previous studies have suggested that diets rich in cholesterol and saturated fats increased the deposition of Abeta and the risk of developing AD. Here we demonstrate that a diet rich in saturated fats and low in carbohydrates can actually reduce levels of Abeta. Therefore, dietary strategies aimed at reducing Abeta levels should take into account interactions of dietary components and the metabolic outcomes, in particular, levels of carbohydrates, total calories, and presence of ketone bodies should be considered.
Matti Narkia

FAQ - Australian Homo Optimus Society Homepage - cybernaut.com.au - 0 views

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    No one can dispute that mother's milk is the ideal nutrition, as far as the biochemical composition is concerned. It contains 3 to 11 grams of fat per 1 gram of protein (0.4% unsaturated fat). The conclusion is obvious - if Nature included such a minute quantity of that constituent in such a wonderful food, then we should respect it. Meanwhile, people are being persuaded that plant-derived fats containing polyunsaturated fatty acids which do not exist in mother's milk, are healthy. Nothing is more misleading.

    The best are the fats which contain the highest percentage of energy contributing constituents, or in other words, such in which COOH group is attached to the longest fatty acid chain. Short fatty acid chains contain around 30-40% of energy-contributing constituents, the longest ones over 90%.
    Long-chain fatty acids fully saturated with hydrogen, yields approx. 10 cal/g when metabolised, the same as petrol. Fat's value as a "fuel" for our body increases with the increase in the amount of hydrogen per gram of carbon in its molecule, with the increase in the energy-contributing constituents.
    Chemically, the best are long-chain fully saturated fatty acids, that is to say, solid fats of animal origin. Only fats with the length of the chain above 10 carbon atoms are suitable to be utilised by our cells and tissues without conversion. These fats are directed straight to the blood stream via the lymphatic system, and they do not have to be converted and made suitable by the liver, as is the case with inferior fats (with shorter chains), or all other constituents of consumed and digested foods
Matti Narkia

Australian Homo Optimus Society Homepage - www.cybernaut.com.au - 0 views

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    "Dr Jan Kwasniewski

    This Website is dedicated to Dr Jan Kwasniewski who has spent his lifetime developing and using the Optimal Diet bringing health and happiness to many people.

    Dr Jan Kwasniewski still lives in Poland, he has refused to commercialise his development and is not a very rich person. He does not sell any supplements. Compared with the standards enjoyed by Western medicos he lives a very ordinary, modest life."
Matti Narkia

Homo Diet Healthy Way of Eating, by Dr. Jan Kwasniewski - homodiet.netfirms.com - 0 views

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    Welcome to the English language website for the "Optimal Diet" movement. The Optimal Diet is a dietary model of human nutrition devised and implemented by Dr. Jan Kwasniewski. The Optimal Diet is a movement, which originated in recent years in Poland, and has rapidly spread to a number of countries worldwide, is to improve the well-being, health and biological value of people as individuals, and to correct nutritional mistakes of human kind as a whole, through promotion and implementation of the "optimal" model of human nutrition.

    Optimal Diet is based on the delivery of the most important nutritional elements, e.g., the most valuable proteins and fats, whilst leaving the body in charge of the distribution of these elements to the most critical areas.
    The ideal proportion between the main food components of protein, fat and carbohydrates should be in the range of :
    m m m m 1 : 2.5 - 3.5 : 0.5

    In order to work out the correct daily food intake using this proportion, one has to know how many grams of protein needs to be ingested in a day to satisfy body's requirements.
Matti Narkia

Dr Jan Kwasniewski - homodiet.netfirms.com - 0 views

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    "Jan Kwasniewski was born in 1937 in Poland. He graduated from the Military Medical Academy and specialised in Physical Medicine.
    For many years he worked in the Military Sanatorium in Ciechocinek as dietician where he introduce famous in Poland and at present all over the world his nutritional method which gives the humans good and long health. This method was named "Optimal Diet" which is the cornerstone to the nutritional theory. The principles of the optimal diet at first shock people because the diet recommends eating large quantities of fats along with a radical cut of carbohydrates.
    The basic premise is that the dieter should keep the proper proportion among the three fundamental nutrients in food: protein, fat and carbohydrates. He found that the ideal proportion is from 1:2.5:0.5 to 1:3.5:0.5 meaning that with every gram of protein 2.5 to 3.5 grams of fat and half a gram of carbohydrates should be eaten. In another words, optimal nutrition is a high fat, low carbohydrate diet. "
Matti Narkia

Ketogenic diets and physical performance - Nutrition & Metabolism | Full text - 0 views

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    Ketogenic diets and physical performance.
    Phinney SD.
    Nutr Metab (Lond). 2004 Aug 17;1(1):2.
    PMID: 15507148
    doi:10.1186/1743-7075-1-2

    Impaired physical performance is a common but not obligate result of a low carbohydrate diet. Lessons from traditional Inuit culture indicate that time for adaptation, optimized sodium and potassium nutriture, and constraint of protein to 15-25 % of daily energy expenditure allow unimpaired endurance performance despite nutritional ketosis.

    Both observational and prospectively designed studies support the conclusion that submaximal endurance performance can be sustained despite the virtual exclusion of carbohydrate from the human diet. Clearly this result does not automatically follow the casual implementation of dietary carbohydrate restriction, however, as careful attention to time for keto-adaptation, mineral nutriture, and constraint of the daily protein dose is required. Contradictory results in the scientific literature can be explained by the lack of attention to these lessons learned (and for the most part now forgotten) by the cultures that traditionally lived by hunting. Therapeutic use of ketogenic diets should not require constraint of most forms of physical labor or recreational activity, with the one caveat that anaerobic (ie, weight lifting or sprint) performance is limited by the low muscle glycogen levels induced by a ketogenic diet, and this would strongly discourage its use under most conditions of competitive athletics.
Matti Narkia

Eggs modulate the inflammatory response to carbohydrate restricted diets in overweight ... - 0 views

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    Eggs modulate the inflammatory response to carbohydrate restricted diets in overweight men.
    Ratliff JC, Mutungi G, Puglisi MJ, Volek JS, Fernandez ML.
    Nutr Metab (Lond). 2008 Feb 20;5:6.
    PMID: 18289377

    Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) consistently lower glucose and insulin levels and improve atherogenic dyslipidemia [decreasing triglycerides and increasing HDL cholesterol (HDL-C)]. We have previously shown that male subjects following a CRD experienced significant increases in HDL-C only if they were consuming a higher intake of cholesterol provided by eggs compared to those individuals who were taking lower concentrations of dietary cholesterol. Here, as a follow up of our previous study, we examined the effects of eggs (a source of both dietary cholesterol and lutein) on adiponectin, a marker of insulin sensitivity, and on inflammatory markers in the context of a CRD.

    Conclusion
    A CRD with daily intake of eggs decreased plasma CRP and increased plasma adiponectin compared to a CRD without eggs. These findings indicate that eggs make a significant contribution to the anti-inflammatory effects of CRD, possibly due to the presence of cholesterol, which increases HDL-C and to the antioxidant lutein which modulates certain inflammatory responses.
Matti Narkia

Eggs distinctly modulate plasma carotenoid and lipoprotein subclasses in adult men foll... - 0 views

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    Eggs distinctly modulate plasma carotenoid and lipoprotein subclasses in adult men following a carbohydrate-restricted diet.
    Mutungi G, Waters D, Ratliff J, Puglisi M, Clark RM, Volek JS, Fernandez ML.
    J Nutr Biochem. 2009 Apr 13. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19369056

    We previously reported that carbohydrate restriction (CR) (10-15% en) during a weight loss intervention lowered plasma triglycerides (TG) by 45% in male subjects (P<.001). however><.0001) the consuming than lower amounts individuals><.001), low-density while small lipoprotein><.001). observations agreement in with these><.01) observed was><.0001). observed of larger although subclass the ldl increase was subjects all for an><.05). of group egg the number presented hdl higher large a also particles><.01) sub group the compared to><.001). contrast in><.05). However, only those subjects from the EGG group presented higher concentrations of these two carotenoids in plasma, which were correlated with the higher concentra
Matti Narkia

Paleo Diet Articles, High Protein Diets, Low Carbohydrate Diets, Saturated Fats - 0 views

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    "This page contains abstracts and articles in PDF format by Dr. Loren Cordain and his colleagues."
Matti Narkia

Hyperlipid: Kwasniewski; praise the lard - 0 views

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    "This article was originally published in 2004 in the Chicago Tribune. It's still knocking around on the web in various places but the original seems to have disappeared. You can't have too much of a good thing. Obviously Stephan's recent posts on lard prompted me to put this one up. The imported nutritionist doesn't seem quite as dismissive as you might expect! But notice in the last paragraph that the big bogeyman is protein overload damaging the kidneys! On 60g/d of protein??? Sobor clearly knows nothing about high fat diets, certainly not the one he is commenting so authoritatively about in this case!"
Matti Narkia

Animal Pharm: Palmitic Acid+ CARBS = Mouse Skeletal Muscle IR - 0 views

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    "Peter at Hyperlipid and Stephan at Whole Health have dispelled yet again myths regarding the indictment of the 16:0 long-chained saturated fatty acid Palmitic Acid as the prime instigator of insulin resistance (IR). Researchers are always wrong -- it's... HIGH CARBS PLUS Palmitic acid.

    Their brilliant posts discuss below:
    --Sportzaid (FRUCTOSE) + Palmitate = IR RETARDNESS
    --High Carb Lab Chow + Palmitate = IR in the brain

    Yes. Such inferences applied to low carbers (LCers) is pure ridiculousness. Non-applicable.

    Low/no carb + Palmitic Acid = GOOD THING. All the low-carb/high saturated fat (palmitic acid) and ketosis trials by Hays JH, Volek JS, and Krauss RM have shown reductions in blood insulin, blood glucoses (BG) and peripheral tissue insulin resistance (IR). Directly contrary to the high carb animal or human studies.

    Palmitic acid has a special evolutionary, adaptive role in mammalian metabolism. Stephan showed that it likely 'fills in' when blood glucose starts to decline. "
Matti Narkia

Low-Carb and Mediterranean Diets Beat Low-Fat for Weight Loss, Lipid Changes at 2 Years... - 0 views

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    July 16, 2008 - Both a low-carbohydrate diet or a Mediterranean-style diet may be "effective alternatives" to a low-fat diet, with more favorable effects on lipids and/or glycemic control, new research suggests [1]. The two-year study, which managed to keep almost 85% of the 322 study participants on one of the three diets for the entire period, offers the hope that weight-loss diets can be tailored to personal preferences, without sacrificing efficacy, researchers say.

    "Several recent one-year dietary studies have led the American Diabetes Association to state in January 2008 that low-carb diets should be considered for a maximum of one year," lead author on the study, Dr Iris Shai (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel), told heartwire . "The current two-year study suggests that one low-fat diet doesn't fit all, meaning that the old paradigm should be reconsidered."

    Shai and colleagues publish the results of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) in the July 17, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine
Matti Narkia

Low-carb and Mediterranean diets beat low-fat for weight-loss, lipid changes at two yea... - 0 views

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    July 16, 2008 | Shelley Wood
    Beer-Sheva, Israel - Both a low-carbohydrate diet or a Mediterranean-style diet may be "effective alternatives" to a low-fat diet, with more favorable effects on lipids and/or glycemic control, new research suggests [1]. The two-year study, which managed to keep almost 85% of the 322 study participants on one of the three diets for the entire period, offers the hope that weight-loss diets can be tailored to personal preferences, without sacrificing efficacy, researchers say.

    "Several recent one-year dietary studies have led the American Diabetes Association to state in January 2008 that low-carb diets should be considered for a maximum of one year," lead author on the study, Dr Iris Shai (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel), told heartwire. "The current two-year study suggests that one low-fat diet doesn't fit all, meaning that the old paradigm should be reconsidered."

    Shai and colleagues publish the results of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) in the July 17, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine
Matti Narkia

The Diet-Heart Hypothesis: Subdividing Lipoproteins - Whole Health Source - 0 views

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    The Diet-Heart Hypothesis: Subdividing Lipoproteins
    Two posts ago, we made the rounds of the commonly measured blood lipids (total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides) and how they associate with cardiac risk. It's important to keep in mind that many things associate with cardiac risk, not just blood lipids. For example, men with low serum vitamin D are at a 2.4-fold greater risk of heart attack than men with higher D levels. That alone is roughly equivalent to the predictive power of the blood lipids you get measured at the doctor's office. Coronary calcium scans (a measure of blood vessel calcification) also associate with cardiac risk better than the most commonly measured blood lipids.

    Lipoproteins Can be Subdivided into Several Subcategories

    In the continual search for better measures of cardiac risk, researchers in the 1980s decided to break down lipoprotein particles into sub-categories. One of these researchers is Dr. Ronald M. Krauss. Krauss published extensively on the association between lipoprotein size and cardiac risk, eventually concluding (source):

    The plasma lipoprotein profile accompanying a preponderance of small, dense LDL particles (specifically LDL-III) is associated with up to a threefold increase in the susceptibility of developing [coronary artery disease]. This has been demonstrated in case-control studies of myocardial infarction and angiographically documented coronary disease.

    Krauss found that small, dense LDL (sdLDL) doesn't travel alone: it typically comes along with low HDL and high triglycerides*. He called this combination of factors "lipoprotein pattern B"; its opposite is "lipoprotein pattern A": large, buoyant LDL, high HDL and low triglycerides. Incidentally, low HDL and high triglycerides are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, the quintessential modern metabolic disorder.

    Krauss and his colleagues went on to hypothesize that sdLDL promotes atherosclerosis because of its ability to penetrate the artery wall more easily
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Weight Loss with a Low-Carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or Low-Fat Diet - 0 views

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    Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet.
    Shai I, Schwarzfuchs D, Henkin Y, Shahar DR, Witkow S, Greenberg I, Golan R, Fraser D, Bolotin A, Vardi H, Tangi-Rozental O, Zuk-Ramot R, Sarusi B, Brickner D, Schwartz Z, Sheiner E, Marko R, Katorza E, Thiery J, Fiedler GM, Blüher M, Stumvoll M, Stampfer MJ; Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) Group.
    N Engl J Med. 2008 Jul 17;359(3):229-41.
    PMID: 18635428

    Conclusions Mediterranean and low-carbohydrate diets may be effective alternatives to low-fat diets. The more favorable effects on lipids (with the low-carbohydrate diet) and on glycemic control (with the Mediterranean diet) suggest that personal preferences and metabolic considerations might inform individualized tailoring of dietary interventions. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00160108 [ClinicalTrials.gov] .)
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