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Matti Narkia

Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat... - 2 views

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    Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease.
    Siri-Tarino PW, Sun Q, Hu FB, Krauss RM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jan 13. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 20071648
    doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.27725

    Conclusions: A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD. More data are needed to elucidate whether CVD risks are likely to be influenced by the specific nutrients used to replace saturated fat.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D, nervous system and aging. - Tuohimaa et al. - Psychoneuroendocrinology Volum... - 0 views

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    Vitamin D, nervous system and aging.
    P. Tuohimaa, T. Keisala, A. Minasyan, J. Cachat and A. Kalueff. .
    Psychoneuroendocrinology, Volume 34, Supplement 1, December 2009, Pages S278-S286
    NEUROACTIVE STEROIDS: EFFECTS AND MECHANISMS OF ACTION
    doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2009.07.003

    This is a mini-review of vitamin D3, its active metabolites and their functioning in the central nervous system (CNS), especially in relation to nervous system pathologies and aging. The vitamin D3 endocrine system consists of 3 active calcipherol hormones: calcidiol (25OHD3), 1α-calcitriol (1α,25(OH)2D3) and 24-calcitriol (24,25(OH)2D3). The impact of the calcipherol hormone system on aging, health and disease is discussed. Low serum calcidiol concentrations are associated with an increased risk of several chronic diseases including osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, hypertension, atherosclerosis and muscle weakness all of which can be considered aging-related diseases. The relationship of many of these diseases and aging-related changes in physiology show a U-shaped response curve to serum calcidiol concentrations. Clinical data suggest that vitamin D3 insufficiency is associated with an increased risk of several CNS diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, seasonal affective disorder and schizophrenia. In line with this, recent animal and human studies suggest that vitamin D insufficiency is associated with abnormal development and functioning of the CNS. Overall, imbalances in the calcipherol system appear to cause abnormal function, including premature aging, of the CNS.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D and Disease Incidence Prevention | Free The Animal - 0 views

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    "For what reason I don't know, but this January 2009 editorial by William Faloon of the Life Extension Foundation is making the rounds. Perhaps it just came available on the web.

    It's a good read, particularly in light of the billions and trillions of dollars the thieves & thugs in DC are about to flush down the crapper on your behalf. Some notable excerpts.

    A large number of new vitamin D studies have appeared in the scientific literature since I wrote my plea to the federal government. These studies don't just confirm what we knew 16 months ago-they show that optimizing vitamin D intake will save even more lives than what we projected.

    For instance, a study published in June 2008 showed that men with low vitamin D levels suffer 2.42 times more heart attacks. Now look what this means in actual body counts.

    Each year, about 157,000 Americans die from coronary artery disease-related heart attacks. Based on this most recent study, if every American optimized their vitamin D status, the number of deaths prevented from this kind of heart attack would be 92,500.

    To put the number of lives saved in context, tens of millions of dollars are being spent to advertise that Lipitor® reduces heart attacks by 37%. This is certainly a decent number, but not when compared with how many lives could be saved by vitamin D. According to the latest study, men with the higher vitamin D levels had a 142% reduction in heart attacks."
Matti Narkia

Meta-analysis of longitudinal studies: Serum vitamin D and prostate cancer risk - Scien... - 0 views

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    Meta-analysis of longitudinal studies: Serum vitamin D and prostate cancer risk.
    Yin L, Raum E, Haug U, Arndt V, Brenner H.
    Cancer Epidemiol. 2009 Dec;33(6):435-45. Epub 2009 Nov 25.
    PMID: 19939760
    doi:10.1016/j.canep.2009.10.014

    CONCLUSIONS: According to available evidence from longitudinal studies, serum 25(OH)D is not associated with PC incidence.
Matti Narkia

Coffee, Tea May Stall Diabetes - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Diabetes, Type 1, and Metabo... - 2 views

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    "Dec. 14, 2009 -- Every cup of coffee a person drinks per day may lower the risk of diabetes by 7%.

    A new review of research on the link between lifestyle factors, like coffee and tea consumption, and diabetes risk suggests that drinking regular or decaffeinated coffee and tea all lower the risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Researchers say the number of people with type 2 diabetes is expected to increase by 65% by 2025, reaching an estimated 380 million people worldwide.

    "Despite considerable research attention, the role of specific dietary and lifestyle factors remains uncertain, although obesity and physical inactivity have consistently been reported to raise the risk of diabetes mellitus," write researcher Rachel Huxley, DPhil, of the George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Australia, and colleagues in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

    They say several studies have suggested that drinking coffee may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and others have shown that decaffeinated coffee and tea may offer similar benefits, but there has not been a recent review of the research on the issue."
Matti Narkia

Coffee May Reduce Risk of Deadly Prostate Cancer (Update1) - Bloomberg.com - 0 views

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    "Dec. 8 (Bloomberg) -- Drinking coffee may lower the risk of developing the deadliest form of prostate cancer, according to a Harvard Medical School study.

    In research involving 50,000 men over 20 years, scientists led by Kathryn Wilson at Harvard's Channing Laboratory found that the 5 percent of men who drank 6 or more cups a day had a 60 percent lower risk of developing the advanced form of the disease than those who didn't consume any. The risk was about 20 percent lower for the men who drank 1 to 3 cups a day, and 25 percent lower for those consuming 4 or 5 cups.

    The study is the first to associate coffee with prostate cancer, contradicting previous research that's found no link. The difference may be because Wilson and colleagues looked for the first time at the link between coffee and different stages of the disease, instead of grouping them all together. More research is needed to confirm the findings, she said. "
Matti Narkia

Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee, and Tea Consumption in Relation to Incident Type 2 Diabet... - 0 views

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    Coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea consumption in relation to incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review with meta-analysis.
    Huxley R, Lee CM, Barzi F, Timmermeister L, Czernichow S, Perkovic V, Grobbee DE, Batty D, Woodward M.
    Arch Intern Med. 2009 Dec 14;169(22):2053-63.
    PMID: 20008687

    Conclusions Owing to the presence of small-study bias, our results may represent an overestimate of the true magnitude of the association. Similar significant and inverse associations were observed with decaffeinated coffee and tea and risk of incident diabetes. High intakes of coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea are associated with reduced risk of diabetes. The putative protective effects of these beverages warrant further investigation in randomized trials.
Matti Narkia

C-reactive protein concentration and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and mortal... - 0 views

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    C-reactive protein concentration and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and mortality: an individual participant meta-analysis.
    The Lancet, Early Online Publication, 22 December 2009
    doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61717-7

    Interpretation
    CRP concentration has continuous associations with the risk of coronary heart disease, ischaemic stroke, vascular mortality, and death from several cancers and lung disease that are each of broadly similar size. The relevance of CRP to such a range of disorders is unclear. Associations with ischaemic vascular disease depend considerably on conventional risk factors and other markers of inflammation.
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Rosuvastatin to Prevent Vascular Events in Men and Women with Elevated C-Reacti... - 0 views

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    Conclusions In this trial of apparently healthy persons without hyperlipidemia but with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, rosuvastatin significantly reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events. \n\nRosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein.\nRidker PM, Danielson E, Fonseca FA, Genest J, Gotto AM Jr, Kastelein JJ, Koenig W, Libby P, Lorenzatti AJ, MacFadyen JG, Nordestgaard BG, Shepherd J, Willerson JT, Glynn RJ; JUPITER Study Group.\nN Engl J Med. 2008 Nov 20;359(21):2195-207. Epub 2008 Nov 9.\nPMID: 18997196
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Expanding the Orbit of Primary Prevention -- Moving beyond JUPITER - 0 views

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    Expanding the orbit of primary prevention--moving beyond JUPITER.
    Hlatky MA.
    N Engl J Med. 2008 Nov 20;359(21):2280-2. Epub 2008 Nov 9.
    PMID: 18997195
Matti Narkia

Well - A Call for Caution in the Rush to Statins - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    Judging by recent headlines, you might think so. Last week heart researchers reported that millions of healthy people could benefit from taking statins even if they don't have high cholesterol.\n\nAlthough many doctors hailed the study as a major breakthrough, a closer look at the research suggests that statins (like Crestor, from AstraZeneca, and Lipitor, from Pfizer) are far from magic pills. While they clearly save lives in people with a previous heart attack or other serious heart problems, for an otherwise healthy person the potential benefit remains small.
Matti Narkia

Cholesterol-Fighting Drugs Show Wider Benefit - New York Times - 0 views

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    CHART: Statins Reduce Risks: A study of 18,000 people with high levels of C-reactive protein, or CRP, found that the risk of a heart attack or stroke was cut in half among those who took a statin. The study was stopped after two years, but some participants were tracked for up to five years. (Sources: Dr. Paul M. Ridker; New England Journal of Medicine) (pg.A21)
    A large new study suggests that millions more people could benefit from taking the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, even if they have low cholesterol, because the drugs can significantly lower their risk of heart attacks, strokes and death.

    The study, involving nearly 18,000 people worldwide, tested statin treatment in men 50 and older and in women 60 and older who did not have high cholesterol or histories of heart disease. What they did have was high levels of a protein called high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or CRP, which indicates inflammation in the body.
Matti Narkia

Clinical Implications of JUPITER (Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: a... - 0 views

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    Clinical Implications of JUPITER (Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin) in a U.S. Population
    Insights From the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study
    Yang EY et al.
    J Am Coll Cardiol, 2009; 54:2388-2395,
    doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2009.10.006

    Conclusions: ARIC participants with elevated hs-CRP and low LDL-C had a CVD event rate of 1.57% per year over 6.9 years, similar to the CVD event rate noted in the JUPITER study placebo group (1.36% per year over 1.9 years). The association of hs-CRP ≥2.0 mg/l with increased CVD risk and mortality regardless of LDL-C provides us a simple method of using age and hs-CRP level for identifying higher risk individuals. (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study; NCT00005131)
Matti Narkia

Patients With High CRP And Normal LDL Have Long-Term Risk For Heart Disease, Stroke And... - 0 views

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    "New research shows a long-term benefit in screening people for CRP, a marker for inflammation, even if they have normal levels of bad cholesterol, because of increased long-term risk for heart attack, stroke and death.

    These findings, which will be published online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), demonstrate that a very simple screening, age plus CRP, can identify individuals who may benefit from statin therapy.

    "This study builds on results from the landmark JUPITER trial, which showed that statins can prevent heart disease in people with normal LDL-c, or bad cholesterol, and an increased level of CRP," said Dr. Christie Ballantyne, director of the Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center and last author on the study. "We have demonstrated that the cardiovascular disease event rates persist over time, validating that the risks identified in the JUPITER trial persist for nearly seven year"
Matti Narkia

NephroPal: Vitamin D - The saga goes on... - 0 views

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    "Had enough about reading/hearing about Vitamin D? Well, it keeps on coming. And for my lack of surprise, the medical community in general is not catching on like wild fire. I really don't understand it.
    A recent study from the Heart Institute at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City (click) followed 27,686 patients greater than 50 years of age with no prior history of cardiovascular disease. The Vitamin D levels were checked and classified as such:

    * normal - greater than 30 ng/ml

    * low - 15 to 30

    * very low - less than 15

    The results of the study showed that patients with very low Vitamin D levels in comparison to normal had:

    * 77% greater risk of death

    * 45% increased risk of coronary artery disease

    * 78% increased risk of stroke

    * twice the risk of developing heart failure"
Matti Narkia

Cardiovascular disease risk of dietary stearic acid compared with trans, other saturate... - 0 views

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    Cardiovascular disease risk of dietary stearic acid compared with trans, other saturated, and unsaturated fatty acids: a systematic review1,3.
    Hunter JE, Zhang J, Kris-Etherton PM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Nov 25. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19939984
    doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.27661

    Conclusions: TFA intake should be reduced as much as possible because of its adverse effects on lipids and lipoproteins. The replacement of TFA with STA compared with other saturated fatty acids in foods that require solid fats beneficially affects LDL cholesterol, the primary target for CVD risk reduction; unsaturated fats are preferred for liquid fat applications. Research is needed to evaluate the effects of STA on emerging CVD risk markers such as fibrinogen and to understand the responses in different populations.
Matti Narkia

Arch Ophthalmol -- Cigarette Smoking, Fish Consumption, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake, and ... - 0 views

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    Cigarette smoking, fish consumption, omega-3 fatty acid intake, and associations with age-related macular degeneration: the US Twin Study of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.
    Seddon JM, George S, Rosner B.
    Arch Ophthalmol. 2006 Jul;124(7):995-1001.
    PMID: 16832023

    Conclusions This study of twins provides further evidence that cigarette smoking increases risk while fish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid intake reduce risk of AMD
Matti Narkia

Diet high in methionine could increase risk of Alzheimer's - 0 views

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    "ScienceDaily (Dec. 17, 2009) - A diet rich in methionine, an amino acid typically found in red meats, fish, beans, eggs, garlic, lentils, onions, yogurt and seeds, can possibly increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a study by Temple researchers.

    "When methionine reaches too high a level, our body tries to protect itself by transforming it into a particular amino acid called homocysteine," said lead researcher Domenico Praticò, an associate professor of pharmacology in the School of Medicine. "The data from previous studies show -- even in humans -- when the level of homocysteine in the blood is high, there is a higher risk of developing dementia. We hypothesized that high levels of homocysteine in an animal model of Alzheimer's would accelerate the disease."

    Using a seven-month old mouse model of the disease, they fed one group an eight-month diet of regular food and another group a diet high in methionine. The mice were then tested at 15 months of age -- the equivalent of a 70-year-old human.
Matti Narkia

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of ovarian cancer - ScienceDirect - European Jou... - 0 views

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    Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of ovarian cancer.
    Toriola AT, Surcel HM, Agborsangaya C, Grankvist K, Tuohimaa P, Toniolo P, Lukanova A, Pukkala E, Lehtinen M.
    Eur J Cancer. 2009 Aug 25. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19713101
    doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2009.08.002

    Conclusion
    Overall, we did not observe a significant association between serum 25-OHD concentrations and the risk of ovarian cancer. However, we found evidence suggestive of an increased risk among women with low to insufficient serum 25-OHD concentrations.
Matti Narkia

Lack of Association between Serum Levels of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and the Subsequent Risk... - 0 views

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    Lack of association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the subsequent risk of prostate cancer in Finnish men.
    Faupel-Badger JM, Diaw L, Albanes D, Virtamo J, Woodson K, Tangrea JA.
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2784-6.
    PMID: 18086789
    doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0672
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