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Matti Narkia

Omega-3s help stave off age-related vision loss | Reuters - 1 views

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    "NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Want to keep your eyesight sharp as you age? Eating lots of fish packed with healthy omega-3 fatty acids could help, new research suggests.

    Among 1,837 people who had early signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), those with the highest consumption of omega-3 fatty acids were 30 percent less likely to progress to the advanced form of the disease over a 12-year period than those with the lowest omega-3 intake, researchers found."
Matti Narkia

A randomised comparison of increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentratio... - 0 views

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    A randomised comparison of increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration after 4 weeks of daily oral intake of 10 microg cholecalciferol from multivitamin tablets or fish oil capsules in healthy young adults.
    Holvik K, Madar AA, Meyer HE, Lofthus CM, Stene LC.
    Br J Nutr. 2007 Sep;98(3):620-5. Epub 2007 Apr 24.
    PMID: 17456248

    We conclude that fish oil capsules and multivitamin tablets containing 10 microg cholecalciferol administered over a 4-week period produced a similar mean increase in s-25(OH)D concentration.
Matti Narkia

Arch Ophthalmol -- Cigarette Smoking, Fish Consumption, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake, and ... - 0 views

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    Cigarette smoking, fish consumption, omega-3 fatty acid intake, and associations with age-related macular degeneration: the US Twin Study of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.
    Seddon JM, George S, Rosner B.
    Arch Ophthalmol. 2006 Jul;124(7):995-1001.
    PMID: 16832023

    Conclusions This study of twins provides further evidence that cigarette smoking increases risk while fish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid intake reduce risk of AMD
Matti Narkia

Intake of Fish and n3 Fatty Acids and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease Among Japanese: Th... - 0 views

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    Intake of fish and n3 fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease among Japanese: the Japan Public Health Center-Based (JPHC) Study Cohort I.
    Iso H, Kobayashi M, Ishihara J, Sasaki S, Okada K, Kita Y, Kokubo Y, Tsugane S; JPHC Study Group.
    Circulation. 2006 Jan 17;113(2):195-202. Epub 2006 Jan 9.
    PMID: 16401768
    doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.581355

    Conclusions- Compared with a modest fish intake of once a week or &20 g/d, a higher intake was associated with substantially reduced risk of coronary heart disease, primarily nonfatal cardiac events, among middle-aged persons
Matti Narkia

Fish Oil-Derived Fatty Acids, Docosahexaenoic Acid and Docosapentaenoic Acid, and the R... - 0 views

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    Fish oil-derived fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid and docosapentaenoic acid, and the risk of acute coronary events: the Kuopio ischaemic heart disease risk factor study.
    Rissanen T, Voutilainen S, Nyyssönen K, Lakka TA, Salonen JT.
    Circulation. 2000 Nov 28;102(22):2677-9.
    PMID: 11094031

    Methods and Results-We studied this association in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, a prospective population study in Eastern Finland. Subjects were randomly selected and included 1871 men aged 42 to 60 years who had no clinical coronary heart disease at baseline examination. A total of 194 men had a fatal or nonfatal acute coronary event during follow-up. In a Cox proportional hazards' model adjusting for other risk factors, men in the highest fifth of the proportion of serum DHA+DPA in all fatty acids had a 44% reduced risk (P=0.014) of acute coronary events compared with men in the lowest fifth. Men in the highest fifth of DHA+DPA who had a low hair content of mercury (<=2.0 µg />2.0 µg/g). There was no association between proportion of eicosapentaenoic acid and the risk of acute coronary events.

    Conclusions-Our data provide further confirmation for the concept that fish oil-derived fatty acids reduce the risk of acute coronary events. However, a high mercury content in fish could attenuate this protective effect.
Matti Narkia

Fish Consumption Shifts Lipoprotein Subfractions to a Less Atherogenic Pattern in Human... - 0 views

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    Fish consumption shifts lipoprotein subfractions to a less atherogenic pattern in humans.
    Li Z, Lamon-Fava S, Otvos J, Lichtenstein AH, Velez-Carrasco W, McNamara JR, Ordovas JM, Schaefer EJ.
    J Nutr. 2004 Jul;134(7):1724-8.
    PMID: 15226460

    The effect of fish consumption on plasma lipoprotein subfraction concentrations was studied in 22 men and women (age > 40 y). Subjects were provided an average American diet (AAD, 35% of energy as fat, 14% as saturated fat, and 35 mg cholesterol/MJ) for 6 wk before being assigned to a National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Step 2 high-fish diet (n = 11, 26% of energy as fat, 4.5% as saturated fat, and 15 mg cholesterol/MJ) or a NCEP Step 2 low-fish diet (n = 11, 26% of energy as fat, 4.0% as saturated fat, and 11 mg cholesterol/MJ) for 24 wk. All food and drink were provided to study participants. Consumption of the high-fish NCEP Step 2 diet was associated with a significant reduction in medium and small VLDL, compared with the AAD diet, whereas the low-fish diet did not affect VLDL subfractions. Both diets significantly reduced LDL cholesterol concentrations, without modifying LDL subfractions. Both diets also lowered HDL cholesterol concentrations. However, the high-fish diet significantly lowered only the HDL fraction containing both apolipoprotein (apo) AI and AII (LpAI:AII) and did not change HDL subfractions assessed by NMR, whereas the low-fish diet significantly lowered the HDL fraction containing only apo AI (LpAI) and the large NMR HDL fractions, resulting in a significant reduction in HDL particle size. Neither diet affected VLDL and LDL particle size. Our data indicate that within the context of a diet restricted in fat and cholesterol, a higher fish content favorably affects VLDL and HDL subspecies
Matti Narkia

Clinical Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death by n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Mech... - 0 views

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    Clinical prevention of sudden cardiac death by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and mechanism of prevention of arrhythmias by n-3 fish oils.
    Leaf A, Kang JX, Xiao YF, Billman GE.
    Circulation. 2003 Jun 3;107(21):2646-52. Review.
    PMID: 12782616
    doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.0000069566.78305.33

    This review will be limited specifically to the beneficial prevention by the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of arrhythmic deaths, including sudden cardiac death, which annually causes some 300 000 deaths in the United States and millions more worldwide. We will also show that the growing body of positive clinical studies is supported by what has been learned in animal and laboratory studies regarding the mechanism by which n-3 PUFAs prevent cardiac arrhythmias.
Matti Narkia

n-3 Fatty acids and cardiovascular disease -- Breslow 83 (6): S1477 -- American Journal... - 0 views

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    n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.
    Breslow JL.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6 Suppl):1477S-1482S. Review.
    PMID: 16841857

    The results of prospective cohort studies indicate that consuming fish or fish oil containing the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with decreased cardiovascular death, whereas consumption of the vegetable oil-derived n-3 fatty acid {alpha}-linolenic acid is not as effective. Randomized control trials (RCTs) in the context of secondary prevention also indicate that the consumption of EPA plus DHA is protective at doses <1 g />3 g/d, EPA plus DHA can improve cardiovascular disease risk factors, including decreasing plasma triacylglycerols, blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and inflammation, while improving vascular reactivity. Mainly on the basis of the results of RCTs, the American Heart Association recommends that everyone eat oily fish twice per week and that those with coronary heart disease eat 1 g/d of EPA plus DHA from oily fish or supplements. Directions for future research include 1) RCTs to confirm the initial trials showing that EPA plus DHA decreases cardiovascular death and additional studies to determine whether this effect is due to EPA, DHA, or the combination; the dosage of the effective components; and whether the mechanism of action in humans is prevention of fatal arrhythmias. 2) Clinical studies to determine whether the reduction in cardiovascular disease risk factors is due to EPA, DHA, or the combination and the dosage of the effective components. 3) Clinical studies to determine whether vegetable oil-derived {alpha}-linolenic acid added to a diet enriched in n-6 fatty acids can effectively substitute for fish oil-derived EPA plus DHA.
Matti Narkia

Fish Intake and Risk of Incident Atrial Fibrillation -- Mozaffarian et al. 110 (4): 368... - 0 views

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    Fish intake and risk of incident atrial fibrillation.
    Mozaffarian D, Psaty BM, Rimm EB, Lemaitre RN, Burke GL, Lyles MF, Lefkowitz D, Siscovick DS.
    Circulation. 2004 Jul 27;110(4):368-73. Epub 2004 Jul 19.
    PMID: 15262826
    doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.0000138154.00779.A5

    Conclusions- Among elderly adults, consumption of tuna or other broiled or baked fish, but not fried fish or fish sandwiches, is associated with lower incidence of AF. Fish intake may influence risk of this common cardiac arrhythmia.
Matti Narkia

Cardiac Benefits of Fish Consumption May Depend on the Type of Fish Meal Consumed: The ... - 0 views

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    Cardiac benefits of fish consumption may depend on the type of fish meal consumed: the Cardiovascular Health Study.
    Mozaffarian D, Lemaitre RN, Kuller LH, Burke GL, Tracy RP, Siscovick DS; Cardiovascular Health Study.
    Circulation. 2003 Mar 18;107(10):1372-7.
    PMID: 12642356
    doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.0000055315.79177.16

    Conclusions- Among adults aged >=65 years, modest consumption of tuna or other broiled or baked fish, but not fried fish or fish sandwiches, is associated with lower risk of IHD death, especially arrhythmic IHD death. Cardiac benefits of fish consumption may vary depending on the type of fish meal consumed.
Matti Narkia

Effect of Fish Oil on Heart Rate in Humans: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Tr... - 0 views

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    Effect of fish oil on heart rate in humans: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
    Mozaffarian D, Geelen A, Brouwer IA, Geleijnse JM, Zock PL, Katan MB.
    Circulation. 2005 Sep 27;112(13):1945-52. Epub 2005 Sep 19.
    PMID: 16172267
    doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.556886

    Conclusions- In randomized controlled trials in humans, fish oil reduces HR, particularly in those with higher baseline HR or longer treatment duration. These findings provide firm evidence that fish oil consumption directly or indirectly affects cardiac electrophysiology in humans. Potential mechanisms such as effects on the sinus node, ventricular efficiency, or autonomic function deserve further investigation.
Matti Narkia

Quantitative Analysis of the Benefits and Risks of Consuming Farmed and Wild Salmon -- ... - 0 views

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    Quantitative analysis of the benefits and risks of consuming farmed and wild salmon.
    Foran JA, Good DH, Carpenter DO, Hamilton MC, Knuth BA, Schwager SJ.
    J Nutr. 2005 Nov;135(11):2639-43.
    PMID: 16251623

    Contaminants in farmed Atlantic and wild Pacific salmon raise important questions about the competing health benefits and risks of fish consumption. A benefit-risk analysis was conducted to compare quantitatively the cancer and noncancer risks of exposure to organic contaminants in salmon with the (n-3) fatty acid-associated health benefits of salmon consumption. Recommended levels of (n-3) fatty acid intake, as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may be achieved by consuming farmed or wild salmon while maintaining an acceptable level of noncarcinogenic risk. However, the recommended level of EPA+DHA intake cannot be achieved solely from farmed or wild salmon while maintaining an acceptable level of carcinogenic risk. Although the benefit-risk ratio for carcinogens and noncarcinogens is significantly greater for wild Pacific salmon than for farmed Atlantic salmon as a group, the ratio for some subgroups of farmed salmon is on par with the ratio for wild salmon. This analysis suggests that risk of exposure to contaminants in farmed and wild salmon is partially offset by the fatty acid-associated health benefits. However, young children, women of child-bearing age, pregnant women, and nursing mothers not at significant risk for sudden cardiac death associated with CHD but concerned with health impairments such as reduction in IQ and other cognitive and behavioral effects, can minimize contaminant exposure by choosing the least contaminated wild salmon or by selecting other sources of (n-3) fatty acids.
Matti Narkia

Fish intake is associated with a reduced progression of coronary artery ather... - 0 views

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    Fish intake is associated with a reduced progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease.
    Erkkilä AT, Lichtenstein AH, Mozaffarian D, Herrington DM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Sep;80(3):626-32.
    PMID: 15321802

    Conclusions: Consumption of fish is associated with a significantly reduced progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis in women with coronary artery disease.
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Fish Consumption and the 30-Year Risk of Fatal Myocardial Infarction - 0 views

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    Fish consumption and the 30-year risk of fatal myocardial infarction.
    Daviglus ML, Stamler J, Orencia AJ, Dyer AR, Liu K, Greenland P, Walsh MK, Morris D, Shekelle RB.
    N Engl J Med. 1997 Apr 10;336(15):1046-53.
    PMID: 9091800

    Conclusions These data show an inverse association between fish consumption and death from coronary heart disease, especially nonsudden death from myocardial infarction.
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Mercury, Fish Oils, and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction - 0 views

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    Mercury, fish oils, and the risk of myocardial infarction.
    Guallar E, Sanz-Gallardo MI, van't Veer P, Bode P, Aro A, Gómez-Aracena J, Kark JD, Riemersma RA, Martín-Moreno JM, Kok FJ; Heavy Metals and Myocardial Infarction Study Group.
    N Engl J Med. 2002 Nov 28;347(22):1747-54.
    PMID: 12456850

    Conclusions The toenail mercury level was directly associated with the risk of myocardial infarction, and the adipose-tissue DHA level was inversely associated with the risk. High mercury content may diminish the cardioprotective effect of fish intake.
Matti Narkia

Mercury, Fish Oils, and Risk of Acute Coronary Events and Cardiovascular Disease, Coron... - 0 views

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    Mercury, fish oils, and risk of acute coronary events and cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and all-cause mortality in men in eastern Finland.
    Virtanen JK, Voutilainen S, Rissanen TH, Mursu J, Tuomainen TP, Korhonen MJ, Valkonen VP, Seppänen K, Laukkanen JA, Salonen JT.
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2005 Jan;25(1):228-33. Epub 2004 Nov 11.
    PMID: 15539625
    doi: 10.1161/01.ATV.0000150040.20950.61

    Conclusions- High content of mercury in hair may be a risk factor for acute coronary events and CVD, CHD, and all-cause mortality in middle-aged eastern Finnish men. Mercury may also attenuate the protective effects of fish on cardiovascular health.

    Mercury may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, high mercury content in hair increased the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in middle-aged Finnish men and attenuated the beneficial effects of fish oils on cardiovascular health. Regular consumption of fish with high mercury content should be avoided.
Matti Narkia

Fish consumption and risk of subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI in older adults - 0 views

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    Fish consumption and risk of subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI in older adults.
    Virtanen JK, Siscovick DS, Longstreth WT Jr, Kuller LH, Mozaffarian D.
    Neurology. 2008 Aug 5;71(6):439-46.
    PMID: 18678827
    doi: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000324414.12665.b0

    Conclusions:
    Among older adults, modest consumption of tuna/other fish, but not fried fish, was associated with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts and white matter abnormalities on MRI examinations. Our results add to prior evidence that suggest that dietary intake of fish with higher eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content, and not fried fish intake, may have clinically important health benefits
Matti Narkia

Fish consumption and risk of major chronic disease in men -- Virtanen et al. 88 (6): 16... - 0 views

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    Fish consumption and risk of major chronic disease in men.
    Virtanen JK, Mozaffarian D, Chiuve SE, Rimm EB.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Dec;88(6):1618-25.
    PMID: 19064523
    doi:10.3945/ajcn.2007.25816

    Conclusions: Modest fish consumption was associated with a lower risk of total cardiovascular disease, consistent with cardiac mortality benefits but not with total cancer or overall major chronic disease; n-6 fatty acid consumption did not influence these relations.
Matti Narkia

Fish, Vitamin D, and Flavonoids in Relation to Renal Cell Cancer Among Smokers -- Wilso... - 0 views

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    Fish, vitamin D, and flavonoids in relation to renal cell cancer among smokers.
    Wilson RT, Wang J, Chinchilli V, Richie JP, Virtamo J, Moore LE, Albanes D.
    Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Sep 15;170(6):717-29. Epub 2009 Aug 3.
    PMID: 19651663
    doi:10.1093/aje/kwp178

    These results suggest that the flavonoid quercetin may prevent renal cell cancer among male smokers. The possible risk associated with fish intake warrants further investigation before conclusions may be drawn.
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