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A Hughes

elearnspace › learning, networks, knowledge, technology, community - 0 views

  • The open access debate Wednesday, October 19, 2011 At the EDUCAUSE 2011 conference today, I had the pleasure of attending a lecture by Hal Abelson – founding director of Free Software Foundation and Creative Commons. He presented on the state of openness in education. While on the surface openness is gaining traction through scholarship and publication, content providers and journal publishers are starting to push back. During the talk, he used the image below (from this article – .pdf) to argue that journal publishers have a monopoly. The surface progress of openness belies a deeper, more dramatic period of conflict around openness that is only now beginning.
    • A Hughes
       
      As a librarian, I am very interested in the topic of open access. The image of the commercial Journal Publishers is very revealing. I did not realize that Elsevier owned so much of the academic content. I would like to know what other information I can find by Hal Abelson.
Dawn Witt

Camtasia Relay 4 To Improve Captions, Add YouTube Publishing -- Campus Technology - 0 views

  •  
    Updates to Camtasia and YouTube Publishing
Dennis OConnor

E-Learning and Online Teaching Magazine | Scoop.it - 11 views

  •  
    Hi impact, curated magazine of articles and professional resources for those interested in e-learning and online teaching. Published by Dennis O'Connor, Program Advisor for the University of Wisconsin Stout E-Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate Program.
Marcia Jensen

Challenge Yourself to Blog - 0 views

  •  
    The next student blogging challenge will be starting in mid September. Over the next few weeks, I will be getting the registration forms ready and posted on a page on this blog. Make sure you keep checking and sign up when they have been published.
Jamie Van Horn

ollie_4: Educational Leadership: The Quest for Quality--article - 5 views

  • multiple measures
    • Mary Trent
       
      I think quality, multiple measures are important. Too often we give students one shot to get it beacuse we are so focused on covering the content or getting through the book that we miss the most important part....are the students learning the material?
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      As an educator, I have found that I am expected to give multiple measures from directives "on high" only to find myself not able to look at the data,analyze it, and make decisions about it. Yes, we are all at different periods of our lives, yet we all have been given only so much time.
  • responsibility for their own learning
    • Mary Trent
       
      Absolutely! Students should feel as though they are in control of their grades. They should be giving a clear picture of what is expected of them and offered options to get back on track if they fall to the way side.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      I so agree. Giving students power and knowledge about their own learning is extremely engaging and motivating for the student.
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I also agree- my best students have always been the ones who take responsibility for their learning and not just because they want to earn an A, but because they actually care about their learning.
    • Dan Jones
       
      I will concur as well, when they have a clear picture of what is expected of them, they learn more and when the don't hit the target, they are still motivated to learn. Testing should promote learning
  • Effectively planning for the use of multiple measures means providing assessment balance throughout these three levels, meeting student, teacher, and district information needs.
    • anonymous
       
      It is so important to use many different measures to meet the needs of students, teachers and districts because of the large group at hand.  There needs to be a balanced use of these measures.  There are many things to consider with these assessments that the key is to find out what is important to know and how to go about presenting these assessments.
  • ...55 more annotations...
  • they can provide information about student progress not typically available from student information systems or standardized test results. The classroom is also a practical location to give students multiple opportunities to demonstrate what they know and can do, adding to the accuracy of the information available from that level of assessment.
    • anonymous
       
      Standardized test only give a certain amount of information for teachers to see.  Often times, it's a guessing game for kids.  In the classroom, students can be creative and add their style to the assessment with different opportunities to present the information.  
    • Dan Jones
       
      I like seeing teachers use a combination of testing approaches. I think kids get burned out filling in ovals, students like to be creative and can show that better through other means beside multiple choice or darkening ovals.
  • demonstrate
  • Stephen Chappuis, Jan Chappuis and Rick Stiggins
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      This is crazy--I have spent the entire day reading about assessment and this entire year have been working with Carol Commodore a colleague of Stiggins on this exact material. In fact, I am preparing it for professional development with my groups. Crazy!
  • Knowledge targets
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      These are vital to know since when you (see below) are ready to assess these, it is important to link the correct type of  target with the type of assessment/s that is/are best for assessing the target.
  • Reasoning targets
  • Performance skill targets
  • Product targets
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      I was unable to see the figures on this page regardless of the browser that I used. FYI.
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      Same here....
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Same here...I tried both Firefox and Chrome.
  • Selecting an assessment method that is incapable of reflecting the intended learning will compromise the accuracy of the results.
    • Dan Jones
       
      I think teachers create an assessment tool and think if they have a variety of response types, they have a good test. I think there needs to be an added emphasis on making sure the respones format matches the learning that has taken place.
  • This key ensures that the assessor has translated the learning targets into assessments that will yield accurate results. It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      This information aligns the assessment with the type of target that  is being assessed.
  • Specific, descriptive feedback linked to the targets of instruction and arising from the assessment items or rubrics communicates to students in ways that enable them to immediately take action, thereby promoting further learning.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      I became very adept over the years as a writing teacher (and eventually began applying it to my teaching in general--reading and social studies) at descriptive feedback. I am an advocate and proponent because I have seen that feedback instead of scores/marks promotes learning. 
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      This certainly aligns well with the information from last week and writing rubrics with "fix" correctives in order to promote student improvement. A great way to focus on the formative piece.
    • Holly Palmersheim
       
      I would like to see something added here about timely. Specific descriptive is great but if the student doesn't receive the feedback in a timely fashion it becomes more difficult for them.
  • The goal of a balanced assessment system is to ensure that all assessment users have access to the data they want when they need it, which in turn directly serves the effective use of multiple measures.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      Our district is really moving in the direction of standards-based assessment and reporting. This really does present to all stakeholders the specific and most important data---how well is each student meeting the standards of the Iowa Core?
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      I know one question that comes up frequently with groups when we discuss SBAR - how many times must students demonstrate they can meet a standard before they are "checked off"?
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      This creates a concern for me because so many students have it today and it's gone tomorrow. The forgetful hormones set in- in middle school.
  • In such an intentionally designed and comprehensive system, a wealth of data emerges. Inherent in its design is the need for all assessors and users of assessment results to be assessment literate—to know what constitutes appropriate and inappropriate uses of assessment results—thereby reducing the risk of applying data to decisions for which they aren't suited.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      This really should be taught in pre-service courses--but is not. And now that the information exists--I wonder why it isn't taught. Why aren't new/pre-service teachers entering the workforce with this information in their tool box?
  • Sound Assessment Design
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      This entire realm is both challenging and time-consuming. In order to have a high level of confidence, assessments usually need to be used many times and checked for validity and reliability…especially if they are being used as a summative assessment.This entire realm is both challenging and time-consuming.
  • Assess learning targets requiring the "doing" of science with a multiple-choice test.
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      As obvious as this statement is, and even though "doing science" has been an expectation in the Iowa Core (and now the NGSS), there is a general lack of 'performance assessments' in science - especially at the elementary level.
    • anonymous
       
      I'm not typically in the classroom, so I'm asking... why is that? Is it because performance assessments aren't readily available, not easy to score, not easy to administer, messy to set up, time consuming? If these are true, I see lots of barriers in the way of performance testing. Even though they may be more authentic and reliable.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have found many districts concentrate on reading and math at the elementary level...as a result, science is on the back "burner".
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Mary, I absolutely agree! The publishers of the elementary reading series' are caught up in trying to include the required amount of non-fiction reading material for the students and so they have focused on material that is also grade level appropriate to what should be studied in the science and social studies curriculum at each grade level. Teachers are beginning to use the reading series' material as a substitute for real science and social studies lessons as a way to "save time" in their day and still cover all the required material. This does not bode well for the science and social studies learning of our younger students.
  • Figure 1 shows a 3rd grade math test plan
    • anonymous
       
      Figure 1& 2: can be seen in this version of this article: ( http://goo.gl/9S26Q )
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Thanks Clair!
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Strange that only "Number Sense" has 4 items worth 10 points! Could one question be weighted or did they really assign each correct answer 2.5 points?
  • Effective Communication of Results
  • results communicated in tim
  • Will the users of the results understand them and see the connection to learning
    • Andrea Compton
       
      This is my contention with MAP testing. As an AEA consultant, I think it's wonderful for tracking student progress, and making instructional decisions for students, but I have found in more than one school I work with that the teachers receive this data from the testing and then have no idea what it means or what to do with it. It is so sad! They have received training on how to use the results, but by the time the test takes place and they receive the data, they have forgotten how to access it and what to do with it, so in essence the test was a waste of time because it's not going to bring about instructional change for the students in the classroom
  • results provide clear direction for what to do next?
  • Students learn best when they monitor
    • anonymous
       
      I once read a study where students with behavior disabilities saw an improvement in their behavior when they began to track and chart their actions in a spreadsheet. When they could see the change in a chart it became a positive goal to make improvements and watch the trendline go up. Monitoring and taking responsibility.
  • Ongoing classroom assessments
  • Periodic interim/benchmark assessments
  • Annual state and local district standardized tests
  • betting
    • Holly Palmersheim
       
      It is difficult to think we are betting on these practices.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Great point. I have always said, when we are assessing, we are not instructing. I have found as an educator, it's during the test that students will ask the most questions. I consider it low stakes testing when I can tutor them one on one and as a result, some of the best learning takes place.
  • summative tests, the reason for assessing is to document individual or group achievement or mastery of standards and measure achievement status at a point in time.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have found it interesting that we give semester tests, yet very few supervisors, parents, administrators, or students want to know the overall level of student performance....they just want to know the "grade". As a result, I see a need for doing summative testing a bit differently.
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      How would you do summative testing differently? This makes me think about the cumulative projects I have my students complete. Very rarely do students come in to find out how they did. I think I need to move the end date of those projects up a couple of days so I can sit down with the student and go over the project before the last day of class.
  • Teachers should design the assessment so students can use the results to self-assess and set goals.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      As an educator, I have found that having students self-assess is a lesson in itself. So many students think they are excellent, even after seeing many of their peers doing the same task with varying degrees.
    • Pam Rust
       
      I agree that we must teach our students how to self-assess. In some classrooms we have never asked them to do this, so we can't expect them to fully grasp the concept unless we provide ongoing support while they learn to self-assess.
    • Mike Todd
       
      I give a lot of written assessments in science, but have failed to make goal setting explicit. I think this could be really effective at getting students to view the feedback differently, especially if the student had to talk with the teacher about the goal.
  • Use a reading score from a state accountability test as a diagnostic instrument for reading group placement.
  • annual accountability purposes
    • Pam Rust
       
      How do we get our students to care when taking these tests (i.e. Iowa Assessments) so we can truly monitor their knowledge?
  • sacrificed to testing
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Is it possible to over-assess? If new assessments are being added, will students get burned out from being tested?
    • Brooke Maine
       
      Yes! I definitely think students get burned out from testing. My district did away with a few non-required standardized tests and the students did better on what they were required to complete, because they felt it was more necessary and appreciated that they weren't being forced to do all of it.
  • students
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      I think this is key - writing the learning targets in student/parent friendly language. I have started to transition mine into "I can" statements.
  • the use of multiple measures does not, by itself, translate into high-quality evidence. Using misinformation to triangulate on student needs defeats the purpose of bringing in more results to inform our decisions.
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I wish more people understood this! It seems like non-educators (and maybe some people in the education field) just think adding more measurements and assessments means that it is high quality evidence because they equate more evidence as high-quality evidence.
  • The assessor must begin with a clear picture of why he or she is conducting the assessment. Who will use the results to inform what decisions?
    • Brooke Maine
       
      Unfortunately, I feel like this is not something I was ever taught in college and it took me several years of teaching to really think about this and understand it. I definitely feel like I (and my students) missed out on some things in class that could have been better because my knowledge was lacking in this area.
  • selected-response formats
    • Mike Todd
       
      I would have liked to see more specific discussion about the creation of selected-response format questions. I know "concept inventory" type questions that were developed using student misconceptions from previous written assessments are extremely valuable at assessing student learning, especially when compared with traditional questions from a textbook publisher.
  • etter instructional decision
    • Andrea Compton
       
      I wish this were the case. So often I work with schools that are giving multiple forms of assessments in an attempt to insure that students are learning the core material and will do well on the Iowa Assessment only to find that the teachers have no idea how to interpret the scores and data they receive from the tests. This leads to no instructional decisions being made for the student after taking the tests and the testing being nothing but a waste of time.
  • it is not capable of informing the student about the next steps in learning.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      This is so true!! Unless a teacher provides feedback in some way - whether in a conference style or a written style - the student will have no idea how to improve. Too often high school students receive a composition paper back with a letter grade and no comments or only spelling corrections underlined. This does not help the student to know what it is that was done poorly - other than the spelling - or how to improve on the next paper. I firmly believe that even papers that are considered to be "A" papers need to have feedback given - what was done well, what areas might the student extend themselves in next time, what areas could be better even though they were sufficient for this assignment.
  • considered questioning the accuracy of these tests
    • Dan Jones
       
      I create very few tests as I am in special education at the high school level. I am most often proctoring, administering or trying to interpret test results. I actually find myself questioning the accuracy of tests more often than you would think. The students are often asking me what a particular question means. Without giving any clue to the answer, I find myself trying to clarify when I am asking the same question. The way tests are framed and questions are asked can affect the accuracy of tests. I think creating a test that provides accurate results is an incredibly hard task. Kudos to those that are good at it, we need more of you
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • The assessor needs to have a clear picture of what achievement he or she intends to measure. If we don't begin with clear statements of the intended learning—clear and understandable to everyone, including students—we won't end up with sound assessments.
    • kellie kendrick
       
      This is very important to keep and mind, and is something that I had an issue with at the beginning of my teaching career. It is imperative that a teacher knows what the intended outcome of an assessment is going to be before writing that assessment, so that they can look to those outcomes for guidance when writing questions, creating rubrics, or deciding a number of points for the assessment.
  • and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
    • kellie kendrick
       
      I have found that highlighting, bolding, or putting words in italics has really helped my students to pay closer attention to the directions or questions and has led to students increasingly getting answers correct.
  • , and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • You can improve it by explaining why you think that will happen
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Better - ask the student, "How could this statement be more complete? Are you missing something in this component of the rubric?
  • effective feedback
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Resource: "The Power of Feedback" by John Hattie & Helen Timperley (2007) in Review of Educational Research.
  • For each assessment, regardless of purpose, the assessor should organize the learning targets represented in the assessment into a written test plan that matches the learning targets represented in the curriculum.
  • Quality
  • the assessor should organize the learning targets represented in the assessment into a written test plan
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      This seems necessary if we are to achieve the highest level of assessment making sure we are actually assessing the learning targets appropriately, but I struggle with the fact that teachers have the time in their busy schedules or will take the time to create a test plan for every assessment they give.
  • Assessment literacy is the foundation for a system that can take advantage of a wider use of multiple measures
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      Sadly, I feel assessment literacy is lacking in education. We not only need to focus on the assessments we give our students but also on training our educators and classroom teachers on assessment creation and effective use of assessment results.
  • Most assessments developed beyond the classroom rely largely on selected-response or short-answer formats and are not designed to meet the daily, ongoing information needs of teachers and students
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      It's too bad that these tests are being used to make so many decisions in the education system when they are not fully assessing the students learning and mastery of skills.
erichillman

ollie_4_1: Building a Better Mousetrap - 1 views

  • rubrics can help the student with self-assessment; what is most important here is not the final product the students produce, but the habits of mind practiced in the act of self-assessment
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      Applying meta-cognitive thinking to the product should help with an end result.
  • Perhaps the greatest potential value of classroom assessment is realized when we open the assessment process up and welcome students into that process as full partners”
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      Student ownership makes assessment more meaningful.
  • The result is many students struggle blindly, especially non-traditional, unsuccessful, or under-prepared students, who tend to miss many of the implied expectations of a college instructor, expectations that better prepared, traditional students readily internalize
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      In all my training, I've heard over and over that what works for an ELL/Sped student works for a gen ed student, especially those of low SES backgrounds.
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      setting expectations can help all students succeed
  • ...16 more annotations...
  • I once gave extra credit to a student who realized that without providing a shred of meaningful content she could meet all the requirements of a state writing rubric he posted in his classroom. As required she used the word “persuade” and two synonyms, composed a clear topic sentence and closing sentence, and made no spelling or grammatical errors. But she did it without saying anything coherent
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      My husband often has me read his papers for classes - and he struggles with this. He'll meet the minimum requirements, but he won't have a coherent article.
  • Rubrics can be designed to measure either product or process or both; and, they can be designed with dimensions describing the different levels of that “deep learning” so valued in WAC programs.
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      Deep learning should highlight both process and product
  • by designing a rubric on a PC that allows for the easy insertion of assignment specific traits.
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      Shouldn't this be fairly common practice now? I might start with planning with a paper and pencil, but by the time I am publishing I would be doing so on a computer/device of some sort.
  • Is the description of criteria judgemental?
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      I struggled with this when we were creating a group rubric. I guess I was using it as a self-assessment tool, but I could be off track there too.
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      I also struggled with the group rubric because I was unclear as to the intent of the assignment. I will sometimes use the rubric as a teaching strategy, so students can see the expectations and then self -assess through the process.
  • Rubrics that are prescriptive rather than descriptive will promote thoughtless and perfunctory writing; such rubrics are as limiting to the development of rhetorical mastery as the five-paragraph essay. And, rubrics cannot be the sole response to a student’s paper; sound pedagogy would dictate that rubrics should be used in conjunction with other strategies, such as the letter writing/dialogic approach to assessment that Halden-Sullivan describes as preferable to the rubric.
    • Barbara Day
       
      It seems to me that a lot has to do with how the rubric is introduced and discussed.  Do we want to encourage students to write to the rubric, or use the rubric as goals to strive towards. How we describe excellent writing makes a difference.
  • the teacher that uses specific rubrics is always composing new descriptions of quality work, but their students have clearer directions for each assignment.
    • Barbara Day
       
      Rubrics also need to be fluid. They need to be revisited and updated as you use them, so they can better reflect quality writing.  
  • Rubrics can have any number of points along a scale—the ISBE’s rubric rates each trait on separate six-point scales—as long as each point on the scale is well-defined. This may be difficult to do for longer scales. While longer scales make it harder to get agreement among scorers (inter-rater reliability), extremely short scales make it difficult to identify small differences between students.
    • Barbara Day
       
      Too many points on the scale could make it really confusing and difficult to use.  I think it would also become less meaningful to the student.
  • Evaluate your rubric using the criteria discussed in Part 1. Pilot test your rubric or checklist on actual samples of student work. Revise the rubric and try it out again. Share the rubric with your students and their parents.
    • Barbara Day
       
      Evaluating, pilot testing, revising and sharing the rubric are essential to creating a useful tool.  It isn't until you begin using it that you discover points that need to be clarified, or revised, or gaps that must be addressed. As I mentioned in an earlier note, rubrics must be fluid and updated frequently.
  • While many educators make a compelling argument for sharing rubrics with students, others worry that doing so will encourage formulaic writing.
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      I have often felt that some students view the rubric as a checklist and do the minimum. Good rubric writing is a must to get past this aspect.
  • . Clearly defining the purpose of assessment and what you want to assess is the first step in developing a quality rubric. The second step is deciding who your audience is going to be. If the rubric is primarily used for instruction and will be shared with your students, then it should be non-judgemental, free of educational jargon, and reflect the critical vocabulary that you use in your classroom.
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      Another angle is to develop the rubric WITH your students. Helps to provide ownership of learning.
  • Does the rubric relate to the outcome(s) being measured? Does it address anything extraneous? […] Does it cover important dimensions of student performance? Do the criteria reflect current conceptions of excellence in the field? […] Are the dimensions and scales well defined? […] Is there a clear basis for assigning scores at each scale point? […] Can different scorers consistently apply the rubric? […] Can students and parents understand the rubric? […] Is the rubric developmentally appropriate? […] Can the rubric be applied to a variety of tasks? […] Is the rubric fair and free from bias? Does it reflect teachable skills or does it address variables over which students and educators have no control, such as the student’s culture, gender or home resources? […] Is the rubric useful, feasible, manageable and practical? […] Will it provide the kind of information you need and can use effectively?
    • Elizabeth Fritz
       
      This is a lot to think about! I can see the elements we have been using within our group rubric creation.
    • erichillman
       
      This is so important!  We can't move our practice forward without shifting to rubric-based scoring for our authentic tasks.
  • explicit performance criteria, along with supporting models of work, make it possible for students to use the attributes of exemplary work to monitor their own performance.”
    • erichillman
       
      This is one of the hardest things for me, getting the language of the rubric to be concise and explicit.  I know what I want out of the criteria, I just struggle with putting it into a manageableamount of words.
  • a typical example, that they will get an A for writing a 1000 word essay that “cites x number of sources and supports its thesis with at least three arguments” will lead students to perceive writing as a kind of “paint-by-number” endeavor
  • we need a meta-rubric to assess our rubric.
Peggy Steinbronn

ollie_4: Building a Better Mousetrap - 3 views

  • “In short, explicit performance criteria, along with supporting models of work, make it possible for students to use the attributes of exemplary work to monitor their own performance.”
    • keyna day
       
      In my own experience, giving and reviewing the rubric to the students beforehand, analyzing their progress along with the rubric, and students self-assessing as they work on their projects have produced higher quality projects and upper level learning skills. Students have also felt better about the process of doing projects since they know what is being graded and they can see improvement in what they are learning.
    • Tina Wahlert
       
      I agree, Kenya. When the criteria and processes are shared before the student start the assignment it leaves the door open for most of the time to go to great thinking about the concepts they are learning about, not worrying about the processes of completing the assignment.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I think it also helps to have some model work that is anonymous and do some group assessment using the rubric so they will truly understand what is meant by "assessment."
  • More conceptually, critics claim that rubrics, in effect, dehumanize the act of writing.
  • While many educators make a compelling argument for sharing rubrics with students, others worry that doing so will encourage formulaic writing.
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  • most state issued rubrics used in secondary school standardized testing are poorly designed rubrics that list specific static elements encouraging students to simply make sure their essays have those features.
    • keyna day
       
      A poorly written rubric can be just as detrimental in students' learning as poorly structured tests/quizzes. It would lead to confusion for the student and frustration for the teacher.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I can see a place for formula, however. I think as a student gets started with a type of writing, for example, a persuasive expository type, it might be a good reminder of what is needed in that format. Maybe a checklist would work better than a rubric.
  • rubrics provide students with clear and specific qualities to strive for in those assignments that “are open-ended, aligned more closely to real-life learning situations and the nature of learning”
  • when rubrics are published in the classroom, students striving to achieve the descriptions at the higher end of the scale in effect guide their own learning.
  • I once gave extra credit to a student who realized that without providing a shred of meaningful content she could meet all the requirements of a state writing rubric he posted in his classroom. As required she used the word “persuade” and two synonyms, composed a clear topic sentence and closing sentence, and made no spelling or grammatical errors. But she did it without saying anything coherent.
  • General rubrics can be applied to various assignments; for example, one rubric can be used to assess all of the different papers assigned in a freshman composition course. Specific rubrics, on the other hand, are particular to a given assignment—one rubric for a narrative essay, another one for an argumentative essay.
  • student grows to understand fundamental standards in writing—like form and coherence—exist across the board
  • Write a definition of each of the dimensions
  • examples of student work
  • you may choose to develop a holistic scale or a checklist on which you will record the presence or absence of the attributes of a quality product/performance
  • purpose of assessment
  • deciding who your audience
  • “Is the assessment responsive to what we know about how [students] learn?” and “Does the assessment help students become the kinds of [citizens] we want them to be?”
    • keyna day
       
      These and other included questions are excellent to ask when assessing rubrics.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I also liked the guiding questions in the preceeding paragraphs.
  • However, for the student to successfully use a rubric this way, the criteria must be made clear to them and the jargon used must not only be understandable to the student but also be linked specifically to classroom instruction.
    • Tina Wahlert
       
      I believe strongly in this statement. If we do not share the criteria with students in a clear way, it is like they are supposed to guess what is in our heads.
  • When instructors do not explicitly delineate the qualities of thought that they are looking for while grading, they reduce learning to a hit or miss endeavor, where “assessment remains an isolated […] activity and the success of the learner is mostly incidental
    • Susie Peterson
       
      I don't believe that other forms of assessment tools are "nebulous". Teachers can use checklists, detailed expectations, or whatever as long as we can help eliminate the "hit or miss" part of assessment!
  • sound pedagogy would dictate that rubrics should be used in conjunction with other strategies, such as the letter writing/dialogic approach to assessment that Halden-Sullivan describes as preferable to the rubric.
    • Susie Peterson
       
      While I can understand the concerns about formulaic writing, the rubrics themselves don't have to be prescriptive. And shouldn't instructors always use multiple measures to insure that students get the guidance they need?
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I would assume there would be conferencing done in connection with the rubric.
  • However, these critics of rubrics, while their critiques should be considered, mistake the design of specific rubrics with the concept of rubrics in general. Rubrics that are prescriptive rather than descriptive will promote thoughtless and perfunctory writing; such rubrics are as limiting to the development of rhetorical mastery as the five-paragraph essay.
    • Tina Wahlert
       
      Great point - critics of rubrics mistake the design of specific rubrics with the concept of rubrics.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Prescriptive rather than descriptive...design becomes ever more important.
  • we ought to illicit student input when constructing rubrics:
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I am going to give this a try in my fall Drake class. I am teaching a class that will basically involve guided research into the topic of tech integration, and I want students to think about qualities of the topics we discuss.
    • Peggy Steinbronn
       
      Marica, What is the name of your Drake course? I am also teaching a course at Drake this fall semester.
  • they tend to “think more deeply about their learning.”
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      This is what I am hoping for with my students.
  • “deep learning,” which implies a kind of learning that is beyond measurement, an elusive hard to describe enlightenment, but identifiable in the same way good art is: teachers know deep learning when they see it.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      At least we hope they recognize it. I have found rubrics helpful to my own thinking process as I try to articulate what I am looking for.
  • a complaint about rubric design
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Ha!
  • mitagate both teacher bias and the perception of teacher bias (Mathews).
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Double "Ha!"
  • faculty need a shared vocabulary and a basic understanding of how rubrics operate.
  • rubrics that are outside of the students “zone of proximal development” are useless to the students.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      So rubrics can be a form of scaffolding, but only if they speak to the next step needed by students to grow in knowledge or improve performance.
  • At the beginning of the process, you could ask a student to select to select which aspect she values the most in her writing and weight that
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Or ask the student what area he/she wants to focus on improving.
  • If the outcomes you wish to measure are multi-dimensional, chances are you need a rubric whatever the purpose of assessment is.
  • Clearly defining the purpose of assessment and what you want to assess is the first step in developing a quality rubric.
  • we need a rubric to judge our performance—that is, we need a meta-rubric to assess our rubric.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I can see why so many iffy rubrics are created...this seems to be a VERY time-consuming process.
  • “Each score category should be defined using description of the work rather than judgments about the work.”
  • Be prepared to evaluate your rubric, using your meta-rubric and feedback—direct feedback from the students and indirect feedback from the quality of their work. Modify accordingly.
  • well-designed rubrics help instructors in all disciplines meaningfully assess the outcomes of the more complicated assignments that are the basis of the problem-solving, inquiry-based, student-centered pedagogy replacing the traditional lecture-based, teacher-centered approach in tertiary education.
  • when we discuss scoring or grading rubrics in the Teaching Center, we are talking about a system designed to measure the key qualities (also referred to as “traits” or “dimensions”) vital to the process and/or product of a given assignment, a system which some educators see as stultifying and others see as empowering.
  • consistently and accurately
  • “filtering”
  • scaffolding
  • “latticing,
  • habits of mind practiced in the act of self-assessment.
Evan Abbey

ollie4_1: Building a Better Mousetrap - 0 views

    • Kay Durfey
       
      The idea that the rubric is genuinely "assessing what students have actually learned rather than what they have been taught" is certain what all educators and trainer (for work environments) are aiming for.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      You nailed it Kay. A teacher must use this to help them teach, not just give the grade.
    • Kay Durfey
       
      If rubrics were designed and implemented correctly students and teacher could see where the thinking of the student was on target and where they went wrong.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think if the rubric is "good" (that is a hard word to use but pretend it fits well), then you can have students assess themselves and together with the teacher 4 or 5 times in the writing process on certain aspects of the rubric to help with the writing process. The piece I wish I would have implemented more (and can but a little tricky as the teacher librarian) was to have families assess with the student as well and to ask a family or 2 BEFORE beginning if they understand what the big assignment & rubric is about and to assess whether the rubric means what it should from their perspectives. If they don't get it, redo it!
    • Aaron Evans
       
      Rubrics are a great tool to build self-assessment skills in all subjects. Two years ago I led my department in an effort to create a self-assessment startegy that builds the abiltity of students to self-assess their learning in math class. Part of this was creating a rubric that measures their progress from 6 to 12 grade. Now we have to go back and refine the rubric, because it is defintiely not to the "good" stage yet.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think it is good for students to be involved. They see that teachers change as well and aren't always right about everything.
  • Moreover, rubrics can help the student with self-assessment; what is most important here is not the final product the students produce, but the habits of mind practiced in the act of self-assessment. However, for the student to successfully use a rubric this way, the criteria must be made clear to them and the jargon used must not only be understandable to the student but also be linked specifically to classroom instruction.
    • Lisa Jacobs
       
      I think the most important use of a rubric is to communicate "quality" work and expectations to students.
    • Lisa Jacobs
       
      Using the rubric to self evaluate their own work.
  • ...23 more annotations...
  • Moreover, some teachers have noticed how students who were good writers become wooden when writing under the influence of a rubric. Dona Patrick, an elementary school teacher noticed that while her sixth grade students did well on their state writing test, those students who had been natural writers, those students who had “stylistic voices full of humor and surprises, produced less interesting essays when they followed the rules [as outlined in a rubric]” (Mathews).
    • Kay Durfey
       
      I think that writing with a rubric only becomes "wooden" if teachers present the idea and implementation of rubrics as a formula rather than a "guideline or set of criteria" that have been noted in effective writing.
    • Aaron Evans
       
      I think that the inclusion of minmum numbers of references/usages is the leading cause of this. If you give a student a minimum, it becomes the target and all they care about. Just tell them you will look for something done well and you get better and more natural results.
    • jquandahl
       
      Something else that might help to keep students' writing from becoming "wooden" would be to have examples of great writing and discuss how those pieces meet the guidelines of the rubric. I think this shows studnets that they can continue to use their own style when writing - as long as they also pay attention to the expectations of the assignment
  • Rubrics can be designed to measure either product or process or both; and, they can be designed with dimensions describing the different levels of that “deep learning” so valued in WAC programs.
    • Kay Durfey
       
      I absolutely agree that rubrics can assess more than a product; it can and should assess the process or "thinking process."
  • cross the board; meanwhile, the teacher that uses specific rubrics is always composing new descriptions of quality work, but their students have cle
  • Consequentially, when rubrics are published in the classroom, students striving to achieve the descriptions at the higher end of the scale in effect guide their own learning. We must keep in mind, however, that other aspects of good pedagogical practice play into student success: rubrics that are outside of the students “zone of proximal development” are useless to the students.
    • Kay Durfey
       
      Interesting.
  • Usually a numerical value is assigned to each point on a scale. You can weight dimensions differently if you feel that one dimension is more important than another. There are two ways in which you can express this value judgment: 1. You may give a dimension more weight by multiplying the point by a number greater than one. For example, if you have four dimensions (content, organization, support, conventions) each rated on a six-point scale, and you wish to emphasis the importance of adequate support, you could multiply the support score by two. 2. You may devise scales of unequal length, which would mean that the shorter scales would count less than the longer ones. For example, organization, support, and content could each be rated on separate 6 point scales, while punctuation and / or spelling could be rated on separate 3 point scales. A paper that was well organized and punctuated would yield 6 for organization and 3 for punctuation. A paper that was perfectly punctuated but poorly organized might yield a 3-3 score.
    • Kay Durfey
       
      This paragraph about weighting certain  parts of the rubric goes directly to what our group was discussing last week regarding our rubric we were creating. This is a kind of how-to.
    • A Hughes
       
      Yes, this explains how a multiplier can be used to show some criteria weighted. I would like to see examples of rubrics using weights.
    • jquandahl
       
      This is nice explanation of how to assign different weights. When we were discussing it lsat week, I think I was making the process more difficult in my own head! I would also like to see examples. I think that weighting dimensions of n ssignment differently can be very helpful in focusing on the most important aspects of an assignment.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I agree that this weighting could help to fix one of the possible problems with rubrics. When you give the same points for various categories sometimes you are giving an easy way to get a grade without always doing the most important part of the learning.
  • Or you can build your own rubric from scratch—convert existing revision or discovery heuristics into rubrics; convert comments that used to show up on A, B, C, D, and F papers into descriptive phrases, or start completely anew. The Chicago Public Schools web-site offers simple guidelines to follow when designing your own rubric. If you visit the web page I cut and pasted this from, you will find that each item is hyperlinked to a full explanation of the step.
    • Kay Durfey
       
      Creating own rubric can  be very effective but also time consuming.
    • jquandahl
       
      Creating rubrics with the help of students is something that I found very effective when I was in the classroom. Studnets had more ownership of the work and a very clear understanding of expectations when they were part of the process of creating the rubric.
  • Clearly defining the purpose of assessment and what you want to assess is the first step in developing a quality rubric. The second step is deciding who your audience is going to be. If the rubric is primarily used for instruction and will be shared with your students, then it should be non-judgemental, free of educational jargon, and reflect the critical vocabulary that you use in your classroom.
  • well-designed rubrics help instructors in all disciplines meaningfully assess the outcomes of the more complicated assignments that are the basis of the problem-solving, inquiry-based, student-centered pedagogy replacing the traditional lecture-based, teacher-centered approach in tertiary education.
    • Aaron Evans
       
      This is really where the Iowa/Common Core is taking us. How many teachers are going to be prepared with ways to measure how their students are progressing in problem solving before the students are being assessed with the new assessments? Since the new state assessments are supposed to emphasize these skills more, will more teachers need to use rubrics to meaure these skills rather than just thinking that rubrics are for judging the quality of writing or projects?
  • they should articulate the vital features that they are looking for and make these features known to the student
    • keri bass
       
      I think the key here is whether or not the rubric is written in a way that is user friendly. Sometimes, they get so specific that they are too long and the reader stops reading. I would think this would be a problem with kids in particular.
  • The result is many students struggle blindly, especially non-traditional, unsuccessful, or under-prepared students, who tend to miss many of the implied expectations of a college instructor, expectations that better prepared, traditional students readily internalize.
    • Aaron Evans
       
      This is true at all levels of education, not just high school. How often had you had a student who was struggling on an assessment and after having the expectations explained to them in a different way completed it easily?
    • keri bass
       
      Absolutely, it is frustrating as a teacher for students to struggle with understanding an assignment and not perform well because of lack of understanding the directions and not the information. I find that in an online environment, this can be even more problematic.  Directions and rubrics that I feel are clearly written, are easily misunderstood by others, and people who would have gleaned understanding from questions others asked in class, feel silly asking questions themselves.
  • rubrics, in effect, dehumanize the act of writing. According to Thomas Newkirk, an English professor at the University of New Hampshire, “rubrics promote ‘mechanical instruction in writing’ that bypasses ‘the human act of composing and the human gesture of response’” (Mathews).
    • Aaron Evans
       
      How do computerized essay graders fit into this? This would seem to be a direct attack on their use.
  • if we have assigned ourselves the task of getting a good rubric to use, we need a rubric to judge our performance—that is, we need a meta-rubric to assess our rubric.
    • Aaron Evans
       
      Hadn't thought abou tthis but it totally makes sense. We already do this reflection, as was evidenced by our rubric activity last week, but having the rubric to frame our thoughts makes the process much more efficienct.
    • jquandahl
       
      interesting point
  • When instructors do not explicitly delineate the qualities of thought that they are looking for while grading, they reduce learning to a hit or miss endeavor, where “assessment remains an isolated […] activity and the success of the learner is mostly incidental” (Montgomery).
  • When instructors do not explicitly delineate the qualities of thought that they are looking for while grading, they reduce learning to a hit or miss endeavor, where “assessment remains an isolated […] activity and the success of the learner is mostly incidental” (Montgomery).
  • When instructors do not explicitly delineate the qualities of thought that they are looking for while grading, they reduce learning to a hit or miss endeavor, where “assessment remains an isolated […] activity and the success of the learner is mostly incidental” (Montgomery). T
  • Moreover, some teachers have noticed how students who were good writers become wooden when writing under the influence of a rubric.
  • A rubric with two or more separate scales is called an analytical rubric, as it takes apart or breaks up the rating system for each trait; a rubric that uses only a single scale is called a holistic rubric. A holistic rubric is more efficient and the best choice when criteria overlap and cannot be adequately separated; an analytical rubric, however, will yield more detailed information about student performance and, therefore, will provide the student with more specific feedback.
  • A rubric with two or more separate scales is called an analytical rubric, as it takes apart or breaks up the rating system for each trait; a rubric that uses only a single scale is called a holistic rubric. A holistic rubric is more efficient and the best choice when criteria overlap and cannot be adequately separated; an analytical rubric, however, will yield more detailed information about student performance and, therefore, will provide the student with more specific feedback.
  • The issue of weighting may be another area in which you can enlist the help of students. At the beginning of the process, you could ask a student to select to select which aspect she values the most in her writing and weight that aspect when you assess her paper.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I kept this private: oops: I am always amazed how students self-assess themselves. I was a language arts teachers and did a lot of writing. When I ask students today or in the past, how they think they did, I was floored how some of the writings/projects I thought were great, assessed themselves negatively, and the ones I thought needed more work, gave/give themselves exceeds. It takes a lot of good modeling and scaffolding for students to fairly assess themselves. For the ones that big time missed the assignment goals and self-assess themselves well, it really goes back to the teacher going back and reteaching again to help improve learning.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Oops- I kept this private. How many teachers did I have that graded in red? I remember many especially in math and writing all over writing assignments. I used to think that the assignment was complete, it was time to move on, and I just had to accept what they said. Rubrics do give the student a voice when they self assess. I find it interesting it is rooted in the word red or reddish.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      These are good questions... red is a color we have pre-conceptions about.
  • While many educators make a compelling argument for sharing rubrics with students, others worry that doing so will encourage formulaic writing. That “rubric” is listed in most thesauruses as a synonym for “formula” does nothing to dismantle such fears. Well-designed rubrics, though, should not do this; unfortunately, most state issued rubrics used in secondary school standardized testing are poorly designed rubrics that list specific static elements encouraging students to simply make sure their essays have those features.
    • A Hughes
       
      The english teachers who attend Iowa Writing Project professional development are discouraged from using rubrics because of formulaic writing in students. These teachers are encouraged to only score a couple of criteria on each assignment instead of trying to "fix" all of the writing and discouraging students.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I tok the Eastern Iowa Writing Project 8 years ago. Even when I taught, I told the kids, that I would give anything to not have to give them an actual grade. I followed the ideas and allowed them to write whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted. I saw huge growth in their writing, but I know I did poorly "grading" them. I told them over and over to focus on writing process, trying to improve themselves, and comments I gave to help them improve.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      This is my biggest concern with rubrics. I am glad to see it articulated because I have been a little reluctant to share this because rubrics are so popular lately that it seems like I am being negative if I don't care for them. In my highest level projects, I expect students to "wow" me to get an A. It is hard to do that if you are simply following a formula.
    • Lisa Jacobs
       
      Yes, rubrics can limit creativity. We re-learned this with our Ollie group rubric assignment this week with the powerpoint and audio files that did not match the "written" rubric my group designed.
  • To begin with, rubrics can be either “general” or “specific.”
    • Lisa Jacobs
       
      This whole section reminded me of the Iowa ICAM assessments. I spent many years leading the scoring sessions for the ICAM reading and math assessment scoring sessions. The training was very intense with both general and specific rubrics for each item.
  •  
    I was in a class today sponsored by Intel. We discussed Habits of the Mind and how powerful it is for kids to self-assess their work & their learning.
  • ...3 more comments...
  •  
    This makes assessing sound like a game between teachers and students. Kids are lucky if they guess what teachers are assessing.
  •  
    Do kids become so engaged in meeting the requirements of the rubric that they aren't as fluent in their writing?
  •  
    I wasn't aware that rubrics were grouped into holistic and analytic. After reading the descriptions, I'm not sure that I've ever used a holistic rubric.
  •  
    The idea of having kids help create rubrics seems to be recurring.
  •  
    I usually get the best feedback from kids about various rubrics that I use. It helps me tweak it for the next time.
Joanne Cram

ollie_4-fall14: Educational Leadership: The Quest for Quality--article - 13 views

  • Student Involvement in the Assessment ProcessStudents learn best when they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning. This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
    • bgeanaea11
       
      This seems to be to be a critical component to engaging students in their learning.
    • joycevermeer
       
      Writing learning targets in tersm that students will understand can be a challenge...especially with younger children.
    • scampie1
       
      Having I can statements make a huge difference in what the learning will be. All students need this!
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I think goal setting and tracking is way students can take responsibility for their own learning.
    • nathanjenkins
       
      Learning targets and "I can" statements reach all students and guide them in their learning, but even more so help to maintain attention for students that get off task easily or loose focus. Having these short-term goals posted in the classroom can aide in self-guidance of the students. A quick gesture to the poster or board with these goals can redirect without too much effort.
    • Joanne Cram
       
      Student involvement in assessment always produces deeper understanding. When students can create their own learning targets (when guided by the educator), this is deeply beneficial because they've created a mini road map to help them navigate through the content. They won't have any surprises, only answers to the learning targets they hoped to gain.
  • Clear Learning TargetsThe assessor needs to have a clear picture of what achievement he or she intends to measure. If we don't begin with clear statements of the intended learning—clear and understandable to everyone, including students—we won't end up with sound assessments.
    • bgeanaea11
       
      I feel we often assess for the sake of assessing without keeping our focus on what it is we want the student to gain from it in the long run.
    • Deb Vail
       
      I completely agree. I was constantly assessing formatively, but I hate to admit that summative assessments that I created for my units were more assessment for the sake of assessment. I should have approached it more big-picture
    • Deb Vail
       
      Also, I think that clearly communicated learning targets are so important. How many times have I taken classess or sat through PD and was doing what was asked of me, but I wasn't sure why.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      I agree, having clear learning targets is helpful for students.  It gives them an idea of what is most important in a lesson and gives students a guide for learning.  
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      I agree with Deb and Kristina that students need to have clearly defined learning targets which will guide students as to the area of focus. Assessment should be done for a purpose and an outcomes.
    • criley55
       
      I also agree that we can't keep what we are teaching a mystery to the students. They need to know the learning targets so they know what is expected of them. Then they will be able to connect with the content and engage in the learning.
    • Joanne Cram
       
      I think it's important to have a road map that is constantly being referred to- and instructors that ask the question, are we getting there? If the assessment can't answer that question, maybe the instruction needs to be adjusted, or the assessment needs to be thrown out.
  • Keys to BalanceThe goal of a balanced assessment system is to ensure that all assessment users have access to the data they want when they need it, which in turn directly serves the effective use of multiple measures.
    • bgeanaea11
       
      I like the use of the tern balance. It implies we need to USE assessments for information instead of just because we feel we need to assess everything. The issue of access is also critical because if we do not give teachers access to the data directly they cannot effectively use it!
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      Direct access to data provides teachers with feedback as to whether further instruction is needed in a specific area or if students understand and you can move forward. I often question why we start another unit immediately after a test when there may be a need to step back and review an application before moving forward.
    • joycevermeer
       
      If we respond to what the assessment data is telling us we won't always be doing the same things with the same children. Planning for individual and small group instruction becomes necessary if we truly want to scaffold learning.
    • Joanne Cram
       
      Balance as a whole is essential in any learning environment- especially in assessment. Students need to have ample time spent in learning environments that allows them the success they earn in an assessment environment. After that time is used in assessment- students need to know that those assessments will drive the instruction in the future, and they see the value in assessment.
  • ...74 more annotations...
  • What decisions will the assessment inform?
    • bgeanaea11
       
      This is a good question we should ask before each assessment! Why are we assessing this? What will we do as a result?
    • joycevermeer
       
      Yes, and the answer to the question of why we do assessment can't be "because we have to".
    • scampie1
       
      Or because I have to enter something in a LMS system
    • Deb Vail
       
      Great question. I think we often assess because we feel we should and we always do; it's just part of a routine. This question forces more of a big-picture plan for assessment.
  • begin with a clear picture of why he or she is conducting the assessment.
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      I believe that this statement is so true.  The teacher and students must have a clear picture of why the assessment is happening.  I am afraid that many times it is because the curriculum says that it is time for a particular test or the district has said it is time.  But, then the assessments are only being used to give a letter grade or to get stats for a certain audience like the school board.
    • criley55
       
      I completely agree. We can't let pacing guides dictate when an assessment is necessary or what we use it for.
  • Are results communicated in time to inform the intended decisions?
    • criley55
       
      I know there is never enough time to get everything done but if we are not providing timely feedback, then it was a waste of time to give the assignment in the first place.
    • Bev Berns
       
      Using results in a timely fashion is so important!
  • Specific, descriptive feedback linked to the targets of instruction and arising from the assessment items or rubrics communicates to students in ways that enable them to immediately take action, thereby promoting further learning.
    • joycevermeer
       
      This statement really ties into what we learned in unit 1 about rubrics. Having a rubric helps you to be able to give specific descriptive feedback that make continuous improvemnt more likely.
    • Deb Vail
       
      I agree. This is really a biggie. Tmely, specific feedback that is linked to specific learning goals is so important. It takes time, but it sure has an impact on learning.
    • jbdecker
       
      In starting to teach a course online for the first time this fall being able to easily provide written feedback to each and every student has been a positive of the online format. Yes, it takes time and I don't know exactly how soon the students view the comments that I make but it has the potential to make a real impact on student performance and learning. 
  • next steps in learning
    • joycevermeer
       
      Next steps in learning--teachers quickly understand that they must provide this, but don't always see it's connection to how we assess.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      It might be helpful to look at ourselves as coaches, a coach would give feedback to help an athlete improve.  They wouldn't say, "that's average" and move on.  Our assessments shouldn't do this either.  
  • the need for all assessors and users of assessment results to be assessment literate
    • joycevermeer
       
      These examples really help one to understand how various assessment methods have different functions.
  • it's important to know the learning targets represented in the written curriculum.
    • scampie1
       
      This is a challenge for many of us with the new Iowa Core which has process and content targets. Knowing how to assess processes is new to many of us.
    • scampie1
       
      It also requires deep understanding of the curriculum.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      For me, as an art teacher, I have had experience assessing the process.  However, I don't always include it in the final assessment like I should.  It is always interesting to hear the student's perspective in the process they went through when learning.  
  • Most assessments developed beyond the classroom rely largely on selected-response or short-answer formats and are not designed to meet the daily, ongoing information needs of teachers and student
    • scampie1
       
      Teachers often rely on text book published assessment tools that may or may not reflect the intended learning needs of the teacher.
  • Educators are more likely to attend to issues of quality and serve the best interests of students when we build balanced systems, with assessment-literate user
    • scampie1
       
      This statement made me think about the LMS some schools have that make formative assessment a challenge. They tend to require grades for weekly reports to parents that may not be reflective of the process of learning.
  • inform students about their own progress
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I think it is always important to keep in mind the value of students taking ownership in their learning and being aware of their own progress toward standards.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      Yes, when students take ownership of their own learning they are more successful.  It is important to keep in mind when designing assessments.  
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • Sound Assessment Design
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • Sound Assessment Design
  • ods are most likely to produce accurate results for different learning targets.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
  • Examples of bias include poorly printed test forms, noise distractions, vague directions, and cultural insensitivity.
    • Nicole Wood
       
      This was a good reminder to me that many variables impact assessment results in addition to the just the assessment methods.
    • Deb Vail
       
      The vague directions reference is key. It is so critical that directions are clear, but that is easier said than done at times.
    • Diane Jackson
       
      It is easier said than done. I have written directions that I thought were very clear but evidently were not as I had several questions from students. I'm trying to get better at this.
    • Bev Berns
       
      It's interesting that assessment result inacuracies are connected to external factors. So true!
    • Joanne Cram
       
      So many kids don't have any idea what the instructions are, but are too afraid to ask for clarification because they don't want to stick out. It's essential for teachers to make sure that all students know what is expected of them.
  • A mechanism should be in place for students to track their own progress on learning targets and communicate their status to others.
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I consider data binders a great tool for helping students track their own progress on learning targets. They can also use it to communicate their progress to parents at conferences.
    • jbdecker
       
      Teachers being able to organize the grade book or other assessment scores in an online classroom environment might be a powerful tool in allowing students to easily see the progress they are making towards a learning target throughout a particular online course. 
    • Diane Jackson
       
      Students having access to the progress they are making would help give students the motivation to keep improving and a sense of accomplishment.
    • criley55
       
      It seems like a lot of work up front getting things set up for students to be able to track their progress but it is much more meaningful when they are taking responsibility for their learning and have that internal motivation.
  • Ongoing classroom assessments serve both formative and summative purposes and meet students' as well as teachers' information needs.
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I think ActivExpressions (used with Interactive Whiteboards) are an outstanding tool for gathering formative data on student learning. They provide immediate feedback and a method of saving results for teachers to review at a later time.
  • students can use the results to self-assess and set goals
    • Deb Vail
       
      Students have got to be given time for metacognition and reflection to maximize current learning as well as future learning.
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      I believe that it is important for students to be involved in setting goals for their learning and monitoring their own progress.  The research has been available for years on this topic.  
    • Diane Jackson
       
      I agree. It is so important to have students involved in their own learning and in monitoring their progress. I know for me it would have been beneficial to have those options when I was in school. "in the olden days" when I was in school, we weren't given options. Would have been nice!
  • provide the results in a way that helps students move forward
  • written test plan
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This works for some subjects, but not all.  I don't know that I would give my students in drawing a written test.  The written test is a product in my case. 
    • jbdecker
       
      Kristina, The way I read this is that it wouldn't have to be a written test for the students but that we as instructors should have a written plan that shows how our assessments are assessing the various learning targets we are trying to hit.
  • Clear Purpose
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      While in the classroom this was a constant struggle when working with many of the assessments that we were being asked to give to students.  Often we as teachers were not sure of the purpose of the assessments we were being asked to give.  While this did not mean that the assessments were not worthwhile, the lack of communication and development of teacher understanding was a big problem.  On some levels I think we are currently seeing similar miscommunication in schools that are for the first time implementing FAST or another DE approved assessment with their students.  I have spoken with teachers that have little or no context to the different tests within the FAST program and therefore are unaware of the purpose.  This does not mean that they are poor assessments or not worth the time - we know differently.  However, without a clear purpose the information gained from the assessment might easily be lost.
  • Who is the decision maker?
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      This is another area of confusion that I have experienced in the classroom.  As schools started to implement IDM, then RTI, and now MTSS many assessments and interventions started popping up at the elementary level.  Often there was confusion as to what the results of these assessments and interventions would mean, and who would make the decisions.  Having a clear understanding of who will be making the decisions and insuring that those individuals have the background knowledge and understanding to make these decisions is crucial.
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      This is another area of confusion that I have experienced in the classroom.  As schools started to implement IDM, then RTI, and now MTSS many assessments and interventions started popping up at the elementary level.  Often there was confusion as to what the results of these assessments and interventions would mean, and who would make the decisions.  Having a clear understanding of who will be making the decisions and insuring that those individuals have the background knowledge and understanding to make these decisions is crucial.
  • At the level of annual state/district standardized assessments, they involve where and how teachers can improve instruction—next year.
    • jbdecker
       
      Our Social Studies department at our school requested the Social Studies test data from lasts years Iowa Tests from our district.  We were told that even though all of our students had taken the test that we would not be given any breakdown of the data.  Needless to say we were more than a little frustrated by this decision. Unfortunately, even though all of our students took the test it costs money to get a breakdown of the data and the district wasn't willing to pay for that at this time. Why give the assessment if you aren't going to use the data from it to try to improve?? 
  • Reasoning targets, which require students to use their knowledge to reason and problem solve.
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      I see this directly relating to higher order thinking skills where are students are being encouraged to think at a much deeper level and not settle for a single answer. We need to be questioning how and why certain things take place and this would be one way that students are being held accountable for their own learning.
  • Performance skill targets, which ask students to use knowledge to perform or demonstrate a specific skill, such as reading aloud with fluency.
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      The performance skill target provides students with another way to be demonstrate/share their understanding of a specific concept instead of a written test.
    • ajbeyer
       
      These type of assessment and targets are the key to know if students have understood the material that has been presented to them! moodle_iowa
  • Product targets, which specify that students will create something, such as a personal health-related fitness plan
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      What a great way to differeniate instruction. Learning styles vary and its important to provide students with multiple options in completing an assignment.
    • Diane Jackson
       
      I agree with you. Giving students choice in how to express what they have learned is so important. That's a key component in Universal Design for Learning.
  • A Solid Foundation for a Balanced System
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      I absolutely agree:   balanced systems for assessing learning with assessment-literate users.  When a district has many teachers, an implementation plan on how to have all teachers assessment-literate is crucial.  Then how is a district going to measure the success?  It needs to be included in the teacher evaluation process. (Lynn
    • Bev Berns
       
      Many schools are using DuFour's PLC framework to drive teacher collaboration around data points. Wonderful work!
  • Because classroom teachers can effectively use all available assessment methods, including the more labor-intensive methods of performance assessment and personal communication, they can provide information about student progress not typically available from student information systems or standardized test results.
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      The assessment methods utilized by teachers in the classrooms can have the greatest impact on student learning IF the teachers know how to use assessments to impact instruction. Hence, the need for good professional development concerning assessment. (Lynn)
    • Adrian Evans
       
      You raise an interesting point Lynn, "the need for good professional development concerning assessment" (Helmke, L. 2014). I wonder how such a professional development would be received- both at the different building levels (elementary, middle and high schools) as well as looking at different parts of the state.
    • ajbeyer
       
      The teacher is the most powerful player when it comes to assessment. The teacher who sees that child day after day has a more accurate understanding of the performance of the student than a standardized test. This should be a taken into consideration more than the standardized test.
  • Teachers can minimize bias in a number of ways. For example, to ensure accuracy in selected-response assessment formats, they should keep wording simple and focused, aim for the lowest possible reading level, avoid providing clues or making the correct answer obvious, and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • Bias can also creep into assessments and erode accurate results
    • Adrian Evans
       
      I am amazed when I create a test for our Professional Learning Committee, the amount of rigor that we, as teachers, put into choosing the correct verbage and vocabulary for individual questions.
  • Will the users of the results understand them and see the connection to learning?
    • Adrian Evans
       
      The idea of people understanding the results really speaks to me. My wife is an "Instructional Design Strategist" (read Coach) for an elementary school. She knows a lot. She especially knows a lot about assessing at the elementary level, and whenever we would go into a parent-teacher conference for our daughters, she would make sure that the teacher explained the data to me, as she already knew what the score meant. If I just went on what I understood, well my kids were way off the A-D grade charts because they were scoring M and E- little did I know that those meant Meeting and Exceeding...
  • Who will use the results to inform what decisions?
    • Adrian Evans
       
      This is very true. As more and more people (parents, students, teachers, administrators, elected officials as well as the rest of the public) are looking at education, we must be able to justify not only what we are looking to assess but why
  • having more assessments will mean we are more accurately estimating student achievement
    • criley55
       
      Just giving an assessment isn't helping improve student achievement, its' what you do with the information you get from the assessment.
  • Using misinformation to triangulate on student needs defeats the purpose of bringing in more results to inform our decisions.
    • ajbeyer
       
      We try to use so much information and I think it's important to use the RIGHT information when when comes to assessing. moodle_iowa
  • Effectively planning for the use of multiple measures means providing assessment balance throughout these three levels, meeting student, teacher, and district information needs.
    • ajbeyer
       
      Effective planning starts with the teacher. Planning for the needs and assessments of all learners it where effective assessment can be powerful. If they teacher takes the time to plan the assessment, then his or her teaching will probably match that assessment. moodle_iowa
  • What Assessments Can—and Cannot—Tell Us
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      This is a component of assessments that I think has flown under the radar for too long.  In my experience in the classroom, we were often inundated with mounds of data that we had been given very little training or time to understand what it could or could not tell us about our students.   Rather than data bing used for decisions for which they were not suited, it was more common for the data to be collected and never used.
  • Effective Communication of Result
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      This was something that we often struggled with as classroom teachers.  We were collecting more and more data that had the potential to tell us great things about our students, however, the format or system in place did not allow great opportunities to communicate this information with parents.  If we had better system processes in place I think that many of the parents in the community would have been thrilled with the work we were doing.  However, some of our systems limited the communication of results in a timely manner.  While the teachers saw the connection to learning, their were times where I felt the parents did not understand the work we had been doing with their students.
    • Joanne Cram
       
      Since I'm about a week late, I've read through most of these points and my "notes" that I was going to post have all been addressed. This is the one that was most important as a take home to me. I think that assessing without feedback is a huge issue in education. I understand that as teachers, we get busy. But what is the point of giving a grade if there is no learning behind why the grade was assigned?
Jamie Fath

ollie1 (Peterman): Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 28 views

  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student
    • Gary Garles
       
      This is the part that I need to spend a lot of time on...
    • ronda fey
       
      I agree. I need to first understand the tools available from a student's point of view before I can bring it into the classroom.
    • Paloma Soria
       
      Yes, it is a very good personal experience.
    • Charmaine Carney
       
      I think that taking online courses ourselves humbles us and helps us to empathize with our students who experience problems with online learning.
    • Steve Leach
       
      Each time I come to this class, I am engaged in a riveting conflict that involves the following extremes: the fear of being a miserable failure vs. the thrill of successully participating online in a manner that I did not even know exsted two weeks ago.
    • Elizabeth VanDeHey
       
      Working as a student in an online course is so beneficial to those who will later be an instructor in an online course! I believe it provides instructors with empathy and an understanding that it will not be easy for every student and the challenges will vary with each technology tool!
    • Karen Hobbs
       
      I agree that this is a humbling experience.
    • Mari Haley
       
      I think this would be such a plus. I always thought my best early childhood college instructors were those that had had experience in an elementary classroom
    • Jonathan Wylie
       
      As educators, perhaps we should be doing more to experience what our lessons are like from a learner's point of view, and I mean online and offline. We would learn a lot from this.
    • Catherine Leipold
       
      I agree with so many of the comments in this section. It is beneficial to be attempting an online class before presenting an online class. (Or hybrid) And it is good to recall what our students will feel - the 'riveting conflict' as described by Steve Leach is something good to experience.
    • Catherine Leipold
       
      Being able to understand the issues students have with respect to the online presentations can help us 'fine-tune' our lessons. It can perhaps motivate us to search for easier programs or give ideas we can suggest to the publishers of our favorite program to make them work better. It is a humbling experience to jump from feeling like you know what you are doing to being totally 'lost'.
    • manderson34
       
      Frankly, it's fun to be a student when a lesson is engaging and hits our optimal zone of learning and challenge, but on the flip side if a lesson is poorly conceived it is difficult, even for an adult, to stay focused. It is important to put ourselves in the shoes of students in order to grow as educators. Reflection is so important.
    • meliathompson
       
      I think this is very important. One of the reasons I want to get involved in creating my own online course is because I enjoyed being a student and taking classes online. I feel like I know some of the criteria and how to navigate somewhat around an online course that will help me relate to my students. I always like to emphasize to my student whether in the classroom or adult students, that I am sure there will be times when we are going to be learning together.
    • ronda fey
       
      Being able to be in contact with the instructor (and other students) is imparative during an online course.
    • Charmaine Carney
       
      I agree, Ronda. Students, especially those new to online learning or using a new online platform, need that instructor support to avoid becoming too frustrated. Also, contact with other students helps students to learn from each other.
    • Steve Leach
       
      I am one of those students who is new to online learning. On a daily basis, I use face-to-face contact in order to succeed, so this is a very challenging way for me to learn. I am encouraged to know that my instructor and my classmates are there to help me when I have a simple question or am feeling overwhelmed by how much I don't know.
    • Karen Hobbs
       
      This is crucial. Technology is only a vehicle to learning. If the process is too difficult students won't be spending that time on the content.
    • tamela hatcher
       
      Karen, it is nice to know there is a troubleshooting area in online classes and other students to ask questions of.  It is a new way of accessing when we can't see the person on the other end.
    • ronda fey
       
      It is important for instructors to be able to use technology to better prepare out students
    • Charmaine Carney
       
      The challenge is staying current because the technology emerges so quickly.
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      I agree, it is very hard to keep up and stay current with all of the new and better programs that are constantly emerging. It seems like the students are one step ahead all of the time since they are so comfortable with technology.
    • tamela hatcher
       
      I agree Jamie, it is a challenge for teachers to stay current on technology as it changes so fast.  School age kids can fit new technology quickly into their skill set because they have always had technology in their life.
    • cvryhof
       
      I agree the technology changes so fast that for teachers it is more difficult to 'keep up'. I wonder if we get used to one site that works and we get comfortable and we don't keep looking for new ideas or sites to improve our teaching.
    • Steven Sand
       
      With my students, we feel more of a responsibility to expose them to educational sites. The population I teach is comfortable with tech, but using it in an educational setting is were they struggle.
  • ...87 more annotations...
    • Paloma Soria
       
      I have been teaching my subject for twelve years now, but do I know how to demonstrate competence in content knowledge using technology?
  • Assists students with technology used in the course (Varvel III.C)
  • Assists students with technology used in the course (Varvel III.C)
    • Paloma Soria
       
      It is my wish that this class will help me to assist my students with technology as we move to 1:1 school, next year.
    • Steve Leach
       
      Paloma, Does 1:1 mean that every student will have a laptop or some other form of technology available for every class period?
    • jwest70
       
      I would also like to be more technology literate after this course.  While I will not be teaching an online course, I will be enhancing my classroom courses with online resources. 
    • Paloma Soria
       
      I am thinking about the importance of collaboration with other teachers and the help of the school's IT Department to help us growing technologically.
    • Steven Sand
       
      I think collaboration is very important. I'm the only social studies teacher in the middle school level at my school. I love getting together with other middle school social studies teachers and pitching around ideas of what we're using tech wise in class.
  • Communicates with students effectively and consistently
    • Paloma Soria
       
      I wanted to say THANK YOU! to Nancy for doing a great job communicating with all of us, effectively and consistently. Great example in teaching us how to create a community of learners.
    • Charmaine Carney
       
      Yes, Paloma. Nancy is a great example. I took another course with her and was very encouraged when I communicated my frustration.
  • Identifies and communicates learning outcomes and expectations through a course overview/orientation
    • Charmaine Carney
       
      I believe one key to student success in any course is getting them off to a good start. A good overview/orientation is essential so that students know what they will be learning and what will be required of them.
    • Steve Leach
       
      I agree, Charmaine. I found the "Topic 1 Pacing Chart" to be especially helpful last week. I printed it and used check marks to keep track of my progress.
    • Gary Garles
       
      Having one place with all assignments listed by due date was a feature of all my classes. I would continue thta in this context.
    • Steven Sand
       
      This is a must with the population that I teach. We have a high ELL group (many children of first generation immigrants). Have detailed explainitions, not only at the beginning, but throughout any activity or class is needed.
  • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face
    • Charmaine Carney
       
      I think that understanding these differences is essential. What works in one environment may not work in the other. Taking our face-to-face course work and merely putting it online may not be effective nor desirable.
    • Steve Leach
       
      As a newcomer to online learning, I believe the directions need to be incredibly explicit because the students don't necessarily "see" what the instructor sees, and the instructor isn't standing in the same room as the learner with the ability to just point at the concept that is causing the confusion.
    • Gary Garles
       
      Yes, and I had a glitch that prevented me from seeing these notes earlier, and that was very frustrating. Have to allow for tech issues.
    • Karen Hobbs
       
      Being a student in this class gives me an opportunity to experience what my students may encounter. I am presently working from three different computers and each one works (or doesn't) a little differently.
    • barb jens
       
      From my perspective, I feel that you need to be an online student yourself first before you can design and guide an online class. Being a student gives you the understanding and need to predict student needs when designing online instructions that are different and more challenging than face-to-face instruction. It initially takes more time to design online instruction than face-to-face
    • Mari Haley
       
      This is definitely something to think about. Some things would be similar, but others would be very different. I've taught face-to-face classes with adults, but never online
    • Diane Jackson
       
      I agree with you Mari. I believe it is very beneficial to be an online student first before you design your own course. I have worked on a course this year, but am learning so many different ways to present information and engage students by taking this course. I think this will make the course I have been working on more rigorous and engaging to the course participants.
  • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the courseþff
  • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students (SREB A.3, Varvel II.A, ITS 2.a)
  • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students
    • Steve Leach
       
      At my school, North Polk, we are currently discussing how we teachers must be constantly adjusting the strategies we use to teach so that we are better able to meet the needs of all learners. It is not enough to know our curriculum; we must be able to deliver it successfully too.
    • andersonlisa
       
      This is so true! Quality teaching will have the most impact on student achievement - not resources, class sizes or the use of technology.
    • joycevermeer
       
      I appreciate the 2nd half of this statement most--understands HOW to teach the content to students. We must be developing 21st century skills through all content learning and that doesn't happen by using 19th century teaching methods. Cooperative learning and deep thinking needs to occur.
  • • Promotes learning through online collaboration group work that is goal-oriented and focused (SREB C.5, Varvel V.I)
  • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the course
    • Gary Garles
       
      Considering my struggles with the technology to this point, anything I create would be heavily modified during pr after it's first use.
  • Is knowledgeable and has the ability to use computer programs required in online education to improve learning and teaching
    • Elizabeth VanDeHey
       
      Using technology in a classroom is only appropriate if it is beneficial to the learning process for students. Sometimes I believe it is easy to think that using technology is in itself helping students learn, because this generation tends to focus more when on the computer or with a video game type learning device. I imagine this can make it easy to implement technology without a true educational benefit for students and teachers must stay away from that.