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Gina Rogers

Implementation in a Secondary Classroom (Articles) - 0 views

  • giving them some choice about whom they get to work with may increase motivation
    • travisnuss
       
      This is choice I almost always give or at least start with in my class. Pre-covid, when my desks were in groups, I always let the students sit where they wanted the first week because I have found many times they end of sitting with people of similar ability levels or with students they know they can help each other. While some days, they might get off topic, I find most days they work with no disruptions and usually can answer each other questions and only when they can't figure it collaboratively they ask me. Only occasionally do I need to reassign groups and those are usually with freshmen who haven't figured out to handle it yet.
  • “You have to have a principal who understands that when he walks into a room and it’s not silent, it’s okay. And luckily we have that—a principal that supports innovative learning.”
    • Gina Rogers
       
      This is one of the most important supports that any teacher trying something new can have: an administrator that understands learning is not a quiet process. Learning requires students to talk and collaborate and the room will not be silent.
  • Now they have access to the full unit from the beginning, so they can gauge their own pacing and get practice in time management. Completion rules also give me the freedom to have small-group or individual conferences to assess learning and make choices about future instruction
    • Gina Rogers
       
      I love this idea! It is so much planning up front, but it allows you to have small-group or individual conferences. I feel like this is much more meaningful to student learning.
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  • For example, when a teacher assigns a research project, some students will prefer to have a broad range of topics, others will prefer a small list of options, and yet others will prefer to be told what to do. Giving students a short list of topics with an option to create their own topic, with the teacher’s approval, often works well.
    • Gina Rogers
       
      This is very true! I have tried giving students a very wide open option of what they could do, but that was paralyzing for students. Students someetimees need a small list of options or some coaching around a topic or idea of their own to make it viable.
  • Teachers of personalized classrooms tend to use the workshop structure in their lesson designs. The workshop structure has three parts: greater teacher responsibility at the beginning of a lesson, shared responsibility during work time, and greater student responsibility at the end of the lesson. Here is a diagram of activities and time frames in a personalized classroom using the workshop structure
    • Gina Rogers
       
      This reminds me very much of the gradual release of responsibility. I like the inclusion of the share session at the end. I think that builds in metacognative skills for students and has them practice them everyday.
Janet Wills

"Personalized" vs. "Personal" Learning - 1 views

  • student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace. The only choice a student gets is what box to check on the screen and how quickly to move through the exercises
    • benrobison
       
      I do not think of this as personal learning. I would qualify this as individual learning. HOWEVER, I do think there's value in this. I have students who would rather work at their own pace via checklists. That said, this isn't personalized...all of the students do the same thing, just at different speeds.
    • erinlullmann
       
      I agree with you, Ben. I appreciated this clarification between personalized and individual learning. I know that my 5th grade son would really appreciate this style of learning as he gets very frustrated when he has to wait for other classmates to finish tasks before going on to the next thing. I think there is room in education for individualization and personalization. in fact, maybe individualized learning is a good stepping stone toward personalized learning.
    • Gina Rogers
       
      Ben and Erin - I agree with both of your thoughts. To me it seems that personalization has to include more than just student choice in pace of learning. Students have to have some choice in how they learn and what they learn and what they can do to demonstrate mastery. I almost wonder if those elements of personalization that I mentioned above would be difficult for some students who are box checkers like my son who is really good at checking his canvas to-do list, finishing his work, etc. He stays on top of checking the boxes, but sometimes I wonder how deeply he is learning the content that is assigned to him. I don't know if that makes a whole lot of sense.
  • personalized learning experience requires student choice, is individualized, meaningful and resource rich
    • benrobison
       
      I think this becomes much easier with appropriate technology (1:1 devices), but I keep coming back to how much time must be devoted to finding resources for kids. I would think that personalized learning takes a significantly larger volume of "stuff" to accomplish vs. traditional learning....and I can't think of many ways to do this without enough technology.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      As the students progress through this process, why wouldn't they be able to find their own resources?
  • If we can’t engage our kids in ideas and explorations that require no technology, then we have surely lost our way
    • benrobison
       
      From a PhysEd teacher's standpoint, I agree completely. Since we've moved to a 1:1 school (well before the pandemic), we made the philosophy of our PhysEd program to be a chance for the kids to unplug for 45 min. daily. Obviously, that's easy to do in our world. However, we have access to great Heart Rate-based technology. So, it's now about finding the correct balance of play, skill, and time in the THRZ. I would go so far as to say, 1:1 might be doing as much damage wit kids as it is good for them.
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  • You want to really engage kids? Give them opportunities to learn personally
    • benrobison
       
      Virtual instruction during this pandemic has been eye-opening for me with this. With our kids who are 100% virtual learning, we are trying to give them more options for PE-at-Home. Engagement has been an issue, but for the kids that have embraced it, they've done an excellent job. I believe in functional movement in PE, so I try really hard to give the kids the freedom to do things relevant and functional for them.
    • Gina Rogers
       
      I am glad to hear that you have had success with virtual engagement. I have had so many conversations this year about how to engage kids in virtual settings, how to get beyond teaching to the black squares in Zoom or Meet. I admit, as a PD provider, the black boxes rattle me. It has been an interesting experience trying to find the best ways to engage online professional learning participants.
  • personalization only comes when students have authentic choice over how to tackle a problem
    • erinlullmann
       
      I'm not sure if anyone else (specifically math teachers) have heard of Open Middle problems before, but personalized learning kind of reminds me of those. Students all start at the same place and end at the same place (which would be learning/understanding the content and meeting standards) but how students get to the end goal is up to them.
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      Erin - this is how I try to teach my math classes. If I know of multiple ways to solve a problem, I will show my students all of them and then tell them they have to pick whichever method(s) fit their brains. My brain works differently than others - I am a pattern person, not a formula person. So when I am teaching the formula stuff, I always try to show my kids how my brain sees things - just in case there are other pattern people out there.
    • bhauswirth
       
      Students learn all different ways and I agree with showing students all ways a problem can be done and have them choose what way works best for them and their learning style!
  • When that happens, the structures around the classroom leave little room for the kind of authentic, whole-child personalization many teachers dream of offering
    • erinlullmann
       
      This is the conundrum that I have been facing as I've begun learning more about personalized learning through this course. How can we create a balance between the types of schools we've imagined with personalized learning and the demands placed on schools by the government?
  • The idea of personalized learning is seductive
    • erinlullmann
       
      Seven words into the article and I'm already saying, "YES!" As I was talking to my kids about their ideal school and imagining a day in the life of a personalized learner, I kept thinking, "Why can't we create these types of schools? I would LOVE for my kids to go to a school like this!" The idea of creating environments in which students can create their day to match their learning needs and they can pursue topics that they are most interested in is very "seductive." I want that for my students, my own kids, and even for myself. How amazing would it be to teach in a school like we've imagined?
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      This is how 'school' used to be. Kids went for the basics, and then as soon as they had mastered those, they found someone to apprentice to in order to learn the craft/trade that they wanted to do. Or, if they went on to a college, they simply found instructors that were talking about things they were interested in and sat in on those conversations. With the industrialization of America, we had to shift to more standardized learning because manufacturers needed those skills in their factories. So, we actually need to shift back to the old ways (in my opinion).
    • Janet Wills
       
      like many new "initiatives"- it's important to look past the shiny newness and see what is worth keeping
  • The Web has changed or is changing just about everything when it comes to how we think about the ways in which we communicate, collaborate and create
    • erinlullmann
       
      I feel like we've been hearing this for awhile now - we are preparing students for jobs that don't even exist yet. The skills and dispositions they will need to be successful in the workforce are more about problem solving, creative thinking, and communication versus an abundance of knowledge of facts and formulas. So how are we (can we) changing how schools function to match how the "real world" has changed in the last decade?
  • it’s crucially more important to have the dispositions and the skills to create our own educational opportunities, not be trained to wait for opportunities that someone else has selected for delivery.
    • erinlullmann
       
      I had the opportunity a few years ago to talk to upper elementary students about the concept of learning. It was amazing to me that many of these said that learning looks like sitting quietly and listening to the teacher or getting all the questions correct on a test. These definitions made me sad. How is it that in just a few years of schooling we have given students such a passive view of learning? Learning is done to them not something that they are in charge of. Personal learning is a shift in the right directions. We have to TEACH students how to be learners. We have to put them in the "driver's seat" and allow them to make the decisions that will help them learn.
    • Gina Rogers
       
      Erin, your comment really resonates with me. I think sometimes we inadvertently communicate this message about what learning is to our students. We focus a lot on compliance but struggle at teaching students how to learn, how to monitor their own understanding, how to determine where their are gaps in their understanding and where to go next. I think this focus on compliance creates a lot of hoop jumpers or box checkers that know how to play the "game" of school.
  • Big questions, passion, personal interest are what should drive our use of technology, not the other way around.
    • erinlullmann
       
      Yes, yes, yes! This is what I've been striving to get across to my technology director this year as we are working toward a 1:1 digital learning environment in our elementary schools. I want PD to be focused on best practices of instruction not simply the latest and greatest tech features. The way to engage students hasn't changed because we have more access to technology - if we want to truly engage students in the content we have to get them passionate about it and interested in learning more for the sake of learning not just scoring points on an assignment.
  • moving ownership of learning away from the teacher and more toward the student.
    • erinlullmann
       
      Is anyone in an AIW district? We use AIW to some extent within our district and one of the key pieces of learning I took away from my AIW training was asking "Who is carrying the cognitive load?" We need to ensure that the teacher is not the one doing all of the heavy lifting in the learning. We need to design learning experiences in which the students are the ones actively doing the learning. We don't want "sit and get" lessons in which students simply listen to the information. We want students to be asking questions and seeking their own answers.
  • “Personalized” learning is something that we do to kids; “personal” learning is something they do for themselves
    • travisnuss
       
      This statement really stuck out to me - the difference between personalized and personal learning. I think I struggle with "personal" learning because I have the traditional mindset that students need to be able to do and understand a certain amount of math, social studies, science and English to be a well rounded individual and have a hard time comprehending that students learning something for themselves is always going to equal having educational value.
  • many school district leaders require public school educators to teach a specific curriculum
    • travisnuss
       
      This is the part of the whole personal learning experience that has me baffled. This may be the traditionalist in me, but what happens to the viable and guaranteed curriculum that we have spent so many PD hours developing.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      I agree with this thought. I keep thinking aren't there some foundational skills that all student must know? Maybe this is the shift to a more standards based grading that would allow more flexibility?
  • In a world where we can explore almost every interest or passion in depth on our own or with others
    • travisnuss
       
      What becomes the role of the teaching with a personal learning environment, especially at the high school level where many of us have chosen the profession because we have our own passion for that area of expertise? I didn't necessarily get into this profession to help students learn anything, I kind of specifically came into this job because I have a passion for mathematics and want to specifically teach that passion.
    • travisnuss
       
      What becomes the role of the teaching with a personal learning environment, especially at the high school level where many of us have chosen the profession because we have our own passion for that area of expertise? I didn't necessarily get into this profession to help students learn anything, I kind of specifically came into this job because I have a passion for mathematics and want to specifically teach that passion.
  • more effective delivery method than any one teacher with 25 or 30 student
    • travisnuss
       
      So reading this statement, in my mind instantly pops in 25 or 30 individualized lesson plans for personal learning. It may be a more effective delivery method, but is it necessarily efficient. There has to be some sort of structural changes to the current system of education to allow for personalization of learning.
  • but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance
    • travisnuss
       
      Until the state changes the way they evaluate the success of schools and colleges change the way they look at admissions, especially 4 year liberal and public colleges, how do we let students do personal learning, but assure we are going to reach those requirements from the state and make sure students reach the requirements to attend the post-secondary education they want to receive. Based off of legislative decisions made so far this year, I feel like we have even less control and need to show more compliance in the near future than ever before. :(
    • Gina Rogers
       
      I feel you, Travis. I have often thought about this in terms of teacher licensure renewal, too, and how we would love to offer a more personalized approach to PD that are modularized that teachers can pick and choose from to put together a recertification credit. But the focus right now is on seat hours and that is incredibly frustrating when trying to come up with some more innovative PD models for recertification.
  • mass customized learning,” meanwhile, may sound Orwellian but it’s not really an oxymoron because what’s customized is mass-produced – which is to say, standardized. Authentic personal learning isn’t.[6]
    • Gina Rogers
       
      I love this passage so much - the mass customized learning and reference to Orwellian doublespeak are fantastic. I do think that personal learning does become somewhat bastardized when you focus so heavily on the platform, or the program, or the technology that is going to make thee learning happen. That is not personalized learning, that is algorithmized learning or learning that measures me against some predetermined set of criteria but doesn't take into account what I am interested in, what dispositions I have, etc. It is kind of a double edged sword though becuase in order to efficiently make learning personal (given our current human resources constraints in our current models of education - 1 teacher, 31 - 150 kids, prepping for multiple classes/subjects) you need to have some kind of technology to help support.
  • free to expand as a standardized individual.
    • erinlullmann
       
      Personal learning (as Kohn prefers it to be called) seems very good in theory. However, when it comes down to the nitty gritty - planning how it would actually function within a school / classroom, it gets messy. That is the point when many teachers I work with go back to standardization. it's easier when everyone does the same thing. How can we get over this hurdle?
    • bhauswirth
       
      I so agree. Personalized sounds idea but how does that work with 20 - 30 students and 1 teacher? I see where an online program works for this but believe when you put them on a program that a teacher didn't make the connection gets lost.
  • Personal learning entails working with each child to create projects of intellectual discovery that reflect his or her unique needs and interests.
    • erinlullmann
       
      This seems to be the definition that our class is referring to when we say personalized learning.
  • Personalized learning entails adjusting the difficulty level of prefabricated skills-based exercises based on students’ test scores.
    • erinlullmann
       
      This seems to be what another lesson referred to as "individualized" learning - the student has control over how fast they work through the skills, but it is the same skills for all students.
  • Personalized’ learning is something that we do to kids; ‘personal’ learning is something they do for themselves.”[4]
    • erinlullmann
       
      From our debate in the class forums, this quote reminds me of differentiation/individualization versus personalization. In my mind, personalized learning is personalized for each student and giving them control over the what, how, and when of the learning process while still keeping them accountable to the standards and expectations of their grade level.
  • transmission of bits of information
    • erinlullmann
       
      This reminded me of a blog post I read recently about thinking versus remembering. (https://www.byrdseed.com/thinking-or-remembering/) It also connects to the AIW (Authentic Intellectual Work) principles of construction of knowledge and conceptual understanding.
  • Personal learning tends to nourish kids’ curiosity and deepen their enthusiasm.
    • erinlullmann
       
      And if we are creating thinkers who are enthusiastic about learning and curious about the world around them, won't they learn more? Won't they be more employable and successful in the future? And in turn, won't they also probably do better on the state assessments? If students really have to think and understand content at a deeper level, they are more likely to remember what they've learned.
  • It’s as if engaging them in learning without technology has become this impossible task.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      This does tend to be the thought process however I feel that students are actually more engaged when we take away the technology. Without the technology they are more inclined to discuss, collaborate, and think about their work without just assuming what their "google search" search found is the only answer or for that matter the only correct answer.
  • flipping doesn’t do much for helping kids become better learners in the sense of being able to drive their own education.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      Truth! The trick is to get students to drive their own education - I don't have an answer -just a reality.
  • requires us to think deeply about our goals and practices as educators,
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      This is foundational in any sort of teaching. Good pedagogy carries through no matter if it's technology driven, student driven, or teacher driven.
  • This kind of learning allows students to work at their own pace and level, meets the individual needs of students, and perhaps most importantly, is not a one-size fits all model. 
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      Huh. This to me says we should be doing away with the idea of CORE.... I realize why it was implemented, however... I know that many students' brains are not ready for Algebra in 6th, 7th, 8th, even 9th grade - so they really struggle and get frustrated and give up in math.
  • “That has nothing to do with the person sitting in front of you
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      Ugh. This phrase has no place in education. And yet - we have this attitude all of the time. By 'we' I mean those who legislate our requirements and create the standardized tests used to measure.
  • deep learning
    • bhauswirth
       
      Deep learning. I feel like some times when we thinking of online learning we think of videos/lectures, assignments, and etc. the same as a traditional classroom. This is when we need to do some personalization and flipping of our prior knowledge. How do we allow students to still learn the things that the standards say, but in a way that they can show their depth of knowledge by not just answering questions but by us really understanding their understanding of a certain topic. More of the deep learning takes place when they have to create or explain in their own words with reasonsing.
  • data-driven
    • bhauswirth
       
      Data driven was a key word that always grabs my attention. This is where data can be placed into the course to understand where a certain student's pathway lies. This would also be a great example of our students. We have students that are 18 years of age, with minimal prior education but we still place them as a senior grade level. This allows us to really personalize learning for that student for them to be successful.
  • ‘We often say we want creativity and innovation – personalization – but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance.’
    • Janet Wills
       
      This is the tension I am struggling with- it's great to want kids to learn in a personal way, but there are standards we are accountable for
  • they digitally attached it to a generic animated child’s body that “plays” with Barney in the video.
    • Janet Wills
       
      that's creepy
  • “’Personalized’ learning is something that we do to kids; ‘personal’ learning is something they do for themselves.”
    • Janet Wills
       
      this should be on the bumper sticker
  • Tracking kids’ “progress” with digital profiles and predictive algorithms paints a 21st-century gloss on a very-early-20th-century theory of learning.
    • Janet Wills
       
      this brings to mind the questions of PLCs 1. What do we want all students to know and be able to do? 2. How will we know if they learn it? 3. How will we respond when some students do not learn? 4. How will we extend the learning for students who are already proficient? I'm still struggling with the idea of personalized learning and how structurally fits into our school model.
  • B.F. Skinner proposed setting each child before a teaching machine,
    • Janet Wills
       
      it seems that the COVID induced remotely learning across the country has served as a sign that this idea is not good for anyone
  • The idea of personalized learning is seductive
    • Janet Wills
       
      like many new "initiatives"- it's important to look past the shiny newness and see what is worth keeping
  • “Personalized” learning is something that we do to kids; “personal” learning is something they do for themselves.
    • Janet Wills
       
      these definitions are key to any conversation about personalized learning or even when talking about a student-centered classroom
Janet Wills

Implementation in a Secondary Classroom (Articles) - 1 views

  • she uses choice when she assigns homework
    • travisnuss
       
      I've thought about figuring out a way also to give the students a choice in the delivery of the problems they do in class. Where they can choose a set of practice problems from a book, worksheet or a computer program such as IXL or Khan academy to do.
  • picked data about whatever they were interested in—flavors of ice cream, baseball statistics, basketball statistics, whatever they wanted.
    • travisnuss
       
      Choice works well here because there is data involved and data can be found all over the place. With many topics in math, there aren't always choices that can be given that meets a wide range of interests.
  • Now they have access to the full unit from the beginning
    • travisnuss
       
      This is always a worry of mine. Just in a traditional class, I see a lot of students when given a worksheet and the students start to work and work ahead assuming they know how to do it. But when they get done and realized it's all wrong, it's frustrating to have to re-explain everything. I know, that's traditional mindset again.
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  • The classroom is more disorganized, with one student working one way, another a different way—you get the picture. Students are more motivated to do projects than they would have been before. Yes, in the past, I might have said, ‘We’re doing a poster project, and you have to have six pictures on the poster and have this many facts. But I’ve come to the conclusion that the kids are much more motivated when I say, ‘Okay. Here’s a list of choices. Choose one. As long as you follow the steps in my rubric, you’re fine.’”
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      This idea is always fascinated. I really like the idea of giving choices and having a rubric to follow. Options does increase the motivation, pick a method that inspires them and works for them in the learning process. I wonder how teachers get students to venture out and try new project ideas?
    • Janet Wills
       
      I'm okay with the level of chaos described if students are on task
  • I finally understood how to choose the right delivery method for various types of content
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      This has to be a hard concept and skill to get right for the students. I often question what is the difference between finding a video that explains it or a screencast of my lesson. What other modes can be utilized? Been stuck at that stage for about 10 years.
  • my students are now the masters of their own learning destinies.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      What we all probably strive to get to...but how? So many times I hear students question why don't you just lecture or give us the information. Good article talking about the evolution to a more personalized type of learning.
  • Giving students a short list of topics with an option to create their own topic, with the teacher’s approval, often works well.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      Like this idea! Students sometimes are overwhelmed with too much choice. This is a nice compromise a short list of ideas with the option of creating their own.
    • Janet Wills
       
      genius!
  • giving them some choice about whom they get to work with may increase motivation
    • travisnuss
       
      This is something that pre-covid I use to do a lot. My room was normally set up in groups of three and I would never create a seating chart the first day. I always found that most students would sit with others that they could work with naturally. Many times they put themselves in groups with similar abilities or with people that they knew they could work with. Honestly, this made my life easier because many times they figured out they could work through questions without asking me. Only a handful of times (usually with the freshman) would I have to move students and create the groups myself because of disruptions of class. Even the days that some groups were off topic, I never worried too much, because I figured that 95% of the other time they did stay on task was worth the tradeoff.
  • . It hasn’t been easy. It’s taken a lot of research, trial and error, and adjustments on my part. But the results have definitely been worth it.
  • My units in Schoology
  • construct my units with specific learning goals that drive the method of delivery and learning activities.
  • we worry about how to motivate students who appear unmotivated and apathetic.
  • not all choices have a positive effect on motivation and achievement.
erinlullmann

Implementation in an Elementary Classroom (Articles) - 0 views

  • unlearning
    • erinlullmann
       
      This might be the "term of the course" as a lot of personalized learning is unlearning for teachers as well as students. This even applies to my job as a coach / PD presenter. Traditional professional development is a lot of "sit and get." Sometimes this is due to time and sometimes this is due to just doing what we know and we have been taught. I need to remember to "unlearn" my traditional teaching tendencies and move out of the box to try more of a personalized or inquiry based approach.
  • when she answers students’ questions straightforwardly instead of asking questions to help the students find the answers themselves, she’s actually interfering with the learning process.
    • erinlullmann
       
      This makes me think of Michael Bungay Stanier and what he refers to as "The Advice Monster." This applies to so many situations from working with students, to coaching teachers, to talking to your spouse. It is not a natural reaction to turn a question back around on the questioner, but often times the student/teacher/spouse knows the answer. They just need to work through the process of finding it themselves. And it is SO much better when they discover it themselves than when someone else tells them what to do or what the answer is or how to solve the problem. Here's his Ted Talk on the advice monster if you're interested (he's a pretty great presenter): https://youtu.be/Kl0rmx7aa0w
  • students to discover fundamental principles on their own.
    • erinlullmann
       
      "Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn." Did anyone else think of this Ben Franklin quote while reading this?
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  • Thinking Maps, she continues, introduce students to the notion of thinking about thinking — of conceptualizing the thought process objectively,
    • erinlullmann
       
      In traditional schooling the teacher does the thinking for the student. When we turn the thinking over to the student, we have to reteach teach them how to be a learner (depending on how long we've had them in a traditional school system). What does it mean to be a learner? What does it mean to be a thinker? What does your thinking look like?
  • helping children gain active control over the process of thinking so they learn how to learn,
    • erinlullmann
       
      It's messy. It's unstructured. It's hard to plan for. It takes a leap of faith on the teacher's part to try this - to turn the learning over to the students. This would be a great time to invite an instructional coach in to your classroom to work with you. I'm sure that when starting any level of more personalized / inquiry based learning with students, it will be messy. Teachers will want to give up, quit, and go back to the old way. Working with a coach would be beneficial because you have someone in the trenches to help you, encourage you, trouble shoot with you, and help you focus on the end goal all while reminding you about the small victories that occurred each lesson.
  • Giving them directions all the time takes away from the creative process and imagination, which a lot of my kids are lacking,” she says, “because they’re so used to being spoon-fed information that they can barely critically think.”
    • erinlullmann
       
      This is so sad, but it's so true. How can we get curriculum developers, administrators, lawmakers, teachers, parents, etc. to understand this?
  • Play is, after all, the way children are wired to learn, especially in the preschool and kindergarten years. Most teachers know the classroom is the perfect place for children to play, but opportunities to provide those benefits are on the decline.
    • erinlullmann
       
      The kindergarten teachers in my building strongly advocate for their Discovery Centers time each day, which is essentially play time. The only allot 20 minutes or so each day for this but other admin in the district discourage their teachers from doing this as that time should go toward academic learning. The teachers in my building have to almost keep this time of their day on the "down low" with other K teachers in the district because not everyone agrees that it is a good use of time.
  • "How?" The short answer is: one step at a time.
    • erinlullmann
       
      I thought this article had a lot of great tips that could help the process of differentiating, scaffolding, and even personalizing learning easier. I have saved it to my Symbaloo so that I can quickly refer back to it when needed.
dsnydersvjags

PLE Articles - 2 views

  • Students can use their PLE to gather, organize and evaluate learning resources while collaborating and sharing with others.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      This sounds like a way to help students keep track of resources they use frequently. Sounds along the lines of a curation tool that has the added benefit of being able to share with others, so collaboration can occur.
  • Truth be told, I could stand to be more savvy in my own organizing of online learning and networking: I’ve been slow to use tools and develop skills for managing online resource
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      This statement is 100% me. I've created Symbaloo, diigo, pinterest, etc... and never really go back to them for the educational aspects. I still stick to just bookmarking things. I understand the benefits of having a curation tool of some sort. What's the best way to introduce this concept and how to have students decide what type of digital dashboard works best for them? I wonder if the students are as digitally savvy as we perceive them to be when it comes to learning online.
  • The concept of PLE is not a way to replace classroom learning, but to enhance it.
    • Janet Wills
       
      this seems to be a mantra for anything having to do with tech too
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  • The development of PLEs represents a shift in focus from teacher centered classrooms to more learner centered classrooms.
    • Janet Wills
       
      this is a dramatic shift for teachers-- you really have to get past the idea that everybody has to learn the exact same thing
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      It's not just the teachers. It goes so far outside our realm of control. The states have to be willing to allow the different curricula, the Grownups in the houses have to allow their students to learn different things and differently from the traditional. Grades/assessments have to be different.
  • Many students in the first class that tried Symbaloo today commented that they liked the clean, visual interface of Symbaloo and the ease of adding content;
    • Janet Wills
       
      I think of Symbaloo as a mix between Pinterest and Diigo
  • tudents engaging in networked learning have to learn to be more self-directed than in the typical classroom…
    • Janet Wills
       
      this is a repeating theme
  • In accepting responsibility for the learning process, students had to subscribe to news feeds and blogs, discern the value of social bookmarks, and set up the aggregator to manage all the Internet resources.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      I'd love to see how we get students to this point. Organizing and managing all the sources they come across would be key in helping students with their executive functioning skills. What's the starting point for this if they've never had to be in charge of something like this before.
  • Teachers are challenged to provide the appropriate balance between structured lessons and learner autonomy in order to facilitate self-directed learning.
    • brippentrop-nuss
       
      What does this look like? How can teachers scaffold learning to get to this point?
  • But as Drexler points out, we are in a new era where information is abundantly available and professionalism is far more about the effective manipulation– access, evaluation, & application– it only makes sense to reorient learning toward facilitation of students’ “active role in the learning process” and teachers’ provision of the right balance between structured lessons and autonomy; let’s never forget it is an ongoing balancing act. 
    • travisnuss
       
      I don't disagree with this statement, but as a generation that learned primarily via lecture, textbooks and test-taking and feel we were successful learning this method, we are drawn to also teach this way. Until we get better PD and support to change our instruction, this is going to be a tough sell to a generation of teachers.
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      Honestly, we need more buy-in from the Grown-ups in the households too. When their child doesn't come home with a typical assignment, or if they are shown a different method to accomplishing a task - holy moly!
  • students can utilize their PLE to acquire information using preferred apps and resources such as blogs, YouTube, Pinterest, Ning or Delicious
    • travisnuss
       
      How do we get students to do this on their own? When I try and get students to acquire information for different reasons, they seem to just type something into Google and use the first thing that pops up which is Wikipedia. Even with discussions about looking and evaluating appropriate resources, they still want to the easiest path, which is the first few returns when they Google something.
  • Not every student is ready for this responsibility, so teachers need to have strategies in place to guide and support these learners.
    • travisnuss
       
      I'm glad to see this statement in the article as well as the next one about teacher's attaining training be knowledgeable to utilize PLEs. I still have a hard time seeing personalized learning with all students in my classroom without redeveloping the current model of our school and having to deal with resistance of such a change from other teachers, administrators and parents as well as students. It seems such a dramatic change not just from what I currently do as a teacher, but also the way I taught.
  • Preliminary testing I did of Symbaloo under a “test” student login indicated it would function in a stable, normal manner in our network environment for students, so I settled on Symbaloo as my tool of choice for this spring.
    • travisnuss
       
      I've had experience with Symbaloo for other classes I have taken. While I have like the ease of using Symbaloo, it's something that once the class is over, I end up just relying on my bookmarks I have collected over the years in my browser for sites I use rather than ever going back and logging into Symbaloo. It also seems like my students like when I give them a list of websites in class instead of having to find their info. I seem to be able to easily link and list possible sites in Google Classroom, so I wonder, what am I missing with Symbaloo that I can't already accomplish in means that myself and my students are already familiar with?
  • A PLE is the method students use to organize their self-directed online learning, including the tools they employ to gather information, conduct research, and present their findings
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      I love the idea of this. I have a hard time believing that all of our students will buy into it. I see some students really enjoying the freedom and ability to do what they want when they want to. I see others who won't put forth the effort. I know that - like most things - the students will get out what they put into their learning, but how do we force the issue with those that don't want to? I know that in our current system we have these issues too. Do we drop the minimum standards and allow students who want to, to graduate and get jobs at age 14, 15, 16? We used to do that, even just 50 years ago it was a viable solution - is it still?
  • Teachers, she explains, are no longer the primary or even the best source of information available to students, and our work must increasingly attend to supporting students in developing their skills and motivations for becoming themselves networked and sophisticated online learners
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      Are we pushing ourselves out of a job? What will be the educational requirement for someone who 'just' needs to motivate and support students? I know lots of people who are better at that than I am. I know my content, but if they (the students) can find it (the knowledge) somewhere else, why would a district keep me around with my high dollar salary? (insert eye roll emoji)
Gina Rogers

Adaptive Learning System Articles - 0 views

  • The simplest way to think about adaptive learning products in their current state is as tutors.
    • Gina Rogers
       
      I agree with this statement - to an extent. I feel like tutors yes do help reinforce already taught. However, my kids experiences with adaptive learning programs is that there is a limited number of "practice problems" for students to engage in. For example, in Lexia, my kids would get an answer wrong, go through a reteaching of the skill and then get the same practice problem. I feel like a live tutor would have a deeper well of questions or checks for understanding for students to learn from.
  • 1. Help teachers adapt lessons.
    • Gina Rogers
       
      I agree with this. Additionally, I feel that adaptive online learning platforms help teachers adapt the instruction that they provide in the classroom based on the data that they are provided in the platform For example, if a teacher is seeing that three students in a 9th grade class are struggling to find the main idea in a text the teacher might create a small group to reteach that topic to just those students who need that targeted instruction.
  • Important to note, of course, is that in-person instruction does not fall out of the picture in most cases; in fact, it many strengthen instruction as faculty take on a more supporting, coaching role, with less time devoted to delivery of content, which students may or may not already have mastered, and more time focused on one-to-one student engagement and self-paced guidance through a curriculum.
    • Gina Rogers
       
      I think this is biggest benefit of possibly incorporating an adaptive OLP into the classroom: the potential for providing more targeted small group/individual instruction based on student needs.
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  • In thinking about adopting adaptive technology, we suggest first focusing on where this technology might be most useful, which is often in remedial education.
    • Gina Rogers
       
      I think this is the way that I predominantly see adaptive OLP's being used in my kid's classrooms. It is used to give them targeted skills that they have not mastered yet or need to continue to work on - I don't know if I would use the words remedial, though, maybe something more like "skills they are still working on".
erinlullmann

Adaptive Learning System Articles - 0 views

  • supplemental instruction and coaching to students on a one-on-one basis
    • erinlullmann
       
      I think it's always important to remind ourselves that OLPs and ALS are not a replacement for teacher directed instruction. These programs are meant to be supplemental.
  • Imagine if every student in your class could have a private tutor, available to them at any time for as long as they need. Imagine further that these tutors work together to give you a daily report of your whole class—who is doing well, who is struggling on which concepts, and what areas are most difficult for the class as a whole.
    • erinlullmann
       
      I like this tutor analogy and the reminder to teachers that the reports that are part of these adaptive learning programs are meant to be used to help guide classroom instruction.
  • Adaptive technologies can have real value
    • erinlullmann
       
      In my opinion, this applies to ALL technology being used int he classroom. Every program has its benefits IF it is being used as intended. Don't expect the technology to do something it wasn't meant to do. In my mind, I see adaptive learning programs being used during a small group time in the classroom. Traditionally, student who are not participating in the teacher-led small group are doing independent learning tasks. The trouble with this is that students are only practicing skills that they can be successful with independently. They are not actively learning. However, if this independent time could be utilized for Adaptive Learning Programs implementation, then students could be getting "tutored" at their own instructional level rather than simply engaging in busy work.
  • ...12 more annotations...
  • The better approach, from both educational and labor perspectives, is to examine each tool on a case-by-case basis with an open mind, insist on demystifying explanations of how it works, embrace the tools that make educational sense, and think hard about how having them could empower you to be a better teacher and provide your students with richer educational experiences.
    • erinlullmann
       
      One way that I envision teachers using adaptive learning programs is during their small group time. Traditionally, when students are not participating in a teacher-led small group, they are off doing independent tasks. However, these tasks are typically fairly low level as students have to be able to complete them without any assistance from the teacher. If an adaptive learning program could be used instead, then every student could be receiving differentiated and targeted tutoring over skills that are at their instructional level.
  • daptive technologies can have real value
    • erinlullmann
       
      I think this is something we have to remember with each new technology program, app, system, platform etc. that we add to our educational "tool belt." We have to make sure that we are using the technology in the way that it was intended to be used rather than trying to force it to do something that it wasn't built for. We have to be strategic about how and when we use the technology.
  • And studies have been showing that adaptive learning technology can help students achieve comparable results in less time, raise their scores, and improve retention.
    • erinlullmann
       
      These would be interesting studies to look closer at in regards to the comparable achievement results. I do think that adaptive learning programs could definitely have an impact on student achievement for many reasons. One - the ALP is meant to be able to target the skill level of the student and should adapt the lessons based on how well the student is progressing toward mastery. Two - any time a student can receive distributive practice of skills throughout the day / week / over the course of a school year will help with retention. I can see a teacher teaching a specific math skill and then the students reviewing that skill at their level with the ALP.
  • real-time response
    • erinlullmann
       
      Hattie has shown through his meta-analysis of educational research that feedback has a significant impact on student achievement.
  • teachers can keep up with each student’s progress
    • erinlullmann
       
      I think this is really important to remember. With the busyness of teachers' schedules and day-to-day happenings, checking into the ALP to see how students are progressing can maybe get overlooked. In order for the ALP to have the biggest impact on student achievement, teachers need to stay up-to-date on students' progress and making instructional decisions based on the data whether than is via the ALP or during a face-to-face learning session.
  • Personalized Learning
    • erinlullmann
       
      This is where the terms and definitions get a little confusing. To me, adaptive learning is using a technology platform to differentiate instruction for students. The students work their way through online programs that meet them at their specific instructional level. In my mind, adaptive learning transitions quite well into a traditional classroom. However, personalized learning, in my opinion, is a change of philosophy of how and when instruction is delivered to students. Students are more in charge of their learning pathway and can make choices about how, when, and what they learn based on their interests and abilities. Personalized learning may include some technology, but it doesn't have to include an adaptive learning program necessarily.
  • focusing on where this technology might be most useful, which is often in remedial education
    • erinlullmann
       
      I would also include enrichment for students that are above grade level. Often we have many systems in place in our schools for students who may NOT be reaching grade level expectations. However, there are many students in our school that need enrichment or more of a challenge but that side of differentiation often gets overlooked. This is an area that I can see ALPs being very effective.
  • n approach to instruction and remediation that uses technology and accumulated data to provide customized program adjustments based on an individual student's level of demonstrated mastery
    • erinlullmann
       
      Another good definition of adaptive learning programs
  • Personalized learning is really an umbrella term,
    • erinlullmann
       
      I almost see it less as an umbrella term and more as a scale or hierarchy. I see traditional education at one side and personalized learning on the other end. Adaptive learning is a step toward personalized learning.
  • Technology isn't strictly required for personalization
    • erinlullmann
       
      I like this clarification of a difference between personalized learning and adaptive learning programs - personalized learning does not require technology while adaptive learning does.
  • An adaptive learning system can be "facilitator-driven,
    • erinlullmann
       
      Another clarification of differences between the two - adaptive learning is more facilitator-driven while true personalized learning (in my mind) is student-driven.
  • Students still have to put in the work to succeed; but with adaptive technology, they’ll be able to focus on the right work.
    • erinlullmann
       
      It is nice to be able to give students choices with the adaptive learning program. And if you've chosen a quality program, then it doesn't really matter which path the student chooses. Everything within the program is aligned to grade level standards and will be helpful to the student's achievement.
dsnydersvjags

Four reasons to seriously worry about 'personalized learning' - The Washington Post - 0 views

  • in the best student-centered, project-based education, kids spend much of their time learning with and from one another. Thus, while making sense of ideas is surely personal, it is not exclusively individual because it involves collaboration and takes place in a community
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      I love this! I would love to have classes where we could just get together and learn all the cool stuff about triangles. Where I didn't have to grade anything, where students could explore and learn as they wished. I don't think I could pull this off right now though - too many students have the ingrained question "is this worth points in my grade?" when it comes to things like this.
dsnydersvjags

Personalizing flipped engagement | SmartBrief - 0 views

  • You want to really engage kids? Give them opportunities to learn personally, to create their own texts and courses of study, and to pursue that learning with others in and out of the classroom who share a passion.
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      So, it sounds to me like we need to revert back to education as it was in the 1800's - before we decided to make all of our citizens factory workers. We need to allow students to follow their passions - and teachers too. Find someone who loves what you love and learn from them.
dsnydersvjags

What Do We Really Mean When We Say 'Personalized Learning'? | KQED - 1 views

  • personalized
    • brarykat
       
      Personalized learning does give students freedom. Freedom of choice, flexibility of time, and what complete projects will look like.  
  • challenges of personalizing learning
    • brarykat
       
      I think personalized learning can be very challenging for teachers.  It could be seen as out of comfort zone for some teachers.  Providing training and clear expectations of student and teacher goals is imperative for personalized learning to be successful.  
  • leave little room for the kind of authentic, whole-child personalization
    • brarykat
       
      I agree with this statement.  It won't work unless a school district sees value in implementing personalized learning with integrity.  Time, training, and continued support for personalized learning to be successful.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I agree that this cannot be done with integrity without a lot of support and training. I wonder what would this look like in math, gym,or grammar? I see this happening with more ease in the area of reading, science, and social studies that naturally allow research.
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  • everyone they work with is on the same page
  • everyone
    • brarykat
       
      This is another good point about personalized learning. For a successful outcome, staff members need to be informed and commit to making it work.  It would easily unravel without a majority of the staff understanding and "selling" it's value to students, parents, and themselves.
  • “It meets the needs of an individual in a very standardized way, but it doesn’t take into account who that kid is.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I truly think the majority of teachers over many, many years have believed this statement and want to offer more choice. I think technology has increased the ability to meet these goals. How about kids who don't read near grade level or with mental health issues? What does this look like in the elementary? I believe in this statement and 100% in the philosophy of it but wonder how it can be done at a large level.
  • control and compliance
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think these are the heaviest words in the entire article. Schools need some kind of curriculum which by nature pushes more control and compliance. I think we need to really think this through. Assessment gets even tougher. How do you create a truly good rubric that doesn't "push" our agenda and control/compliance but allow students to meet our goals with freedom?
  • system of accountability
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think accountability can be looked at as a dirty word, but it definitely is necessary. Results must be evaluated for improvement, refinement, and celebration, just as we do for our students. Often, we have fidelity checks by various people across the district, principals do walk throughs, we have TCLS in Iowa with walk throughs and diccussions with different people. What would this look like in an online world and how would people look at 30 different students work? When it comes to accountability, people are going to need to start looking more at the product and process and not be able to collect data as much on the fly as we can with more traditional face to face. How exciting...could we create some how to for administrators to help guide this?
  • it is clear that all children don’t learn the same way and personalization seems to honor those differences
    • dsnydersvjags
       
      Finally!! Someone at last admits that education isn't a one-size fits all prospect! Now - can we do away with CORE?
slove517

Tips and Tricks: For Students! - 0 views

  • Student Guide to SoftChalk Lessons
    • slove517
       
      might be helpful to include in general information area for Moodle course
  • A step by step walk through on how to properly complete a graded lesson with activities and quiz questions.
    • slove517
       
      I could help with this one too
slove517

Tech Tips for Teaching with SoftChalk Cloud: Tip 10 - Create a Poll or Rating for stude... - 0 views

  • Within your SoftChalk Cloud Account, click My Content Click Polls or Ratings At the right under Actions, click Create a Poll or Create Rating
slove517

ol101-w2021: Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 2 views

  • Knows and aligns instruction to the achievement goals of the local agency and the state, such as with the Iowa Core
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is a comment!
  • 3. Demonstrates competence in planning, designing, and incorporating instructional strategies (ITS 3) • Identifies and communicates lea
    • ajmoss80
       
      This, along with standard 4, is perhaps what I'm the most concerned about. As a classroom teacher, I knew that my 1st hour didn't always get the best version of me for the day -- which sounds horrible -- because I was also learning as the day went on. I was learning what strategies worked the best to help kids learn. So often my last period of the day looked very different from the first period. What I realize in my new position is that I have less iterations -- less opportunities -- to adjust "on the fly". So more front-loading and preparation has to occur on my part. The inability to course-correct easily has me nervous. Thus, I must improve my planning and designing skills.
  • Understands student motivation and uses techniques to engage students
    • ajmoss80
       
      I appreciate what was taught in the corresponding lesson to this assignment -- that online learners are still normal humans with normal human needs according to Maslow. I think so often we take that for granted -- assuming that just because content is posted "online", that students can automatically find it to be an enriching learning experience. Unfortunately, I've had too many poor online learning experiences -- I know that it doesn't just "happen". I think that this criterion is underrated by many who profess to be online "teachers". I need to improve in this area.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Maintains an online social presence that is available, approachable, positive, interactive, and sincere
    • ajmoss80
       
      This is so critical for a positive online learning experience -- the feeling of connection to other humans. It doesn't occur as organically as it would in a traditional face-to-face classroom environment. So it needs to be planned-for and developed. I already appreciate the weekly video posts -- just so I can see my instructor "in-person" -- it lends such a more welcoming feel to the course. It makes me feel that I am not alone in this journey.
  • Sets and models clear expectations for appropriate behavior and proper interaction (
    • ajmoss80
       
      This is another great example of something I would automatically expect in face-to-face instruction, but I think is largely taken for granted in an online space. There should be norms of behavior online, just as there are norms of behavior in a classroom to promote respectful dialogue.
  • Demonstrates competence in planning, designing, and incorporating instructional strategies (ITS 3)
    • slove517
       
      A teacher needs to be prepared for each class period whether it is online or face to face. There needs to be a plan for what students need to learn and a path for how they will reach the end goal.
  • Creates or selects multiple assessment instruments that are appropriate for online learning
  • Creates or selects multiple assessment instruments that are appropriate for online learning
    • slove517
       
      Just as in a face to face classroom, each student will show their learning differently. It is important to give students different opportunities to show what they know.
  • Creates a learning community that encourages collaboration and interaction, including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content
    • slove517
       
      I think we all enjoy interacting with others, this shouldn't be any different online. The way we interact may look different but it should still be present.
  • Establishes standards for student behavior that are designed to ensure academic integrity and appropriate use of the internet and written communication
    • slove517
       
      As the facilitator of a course, we must model how we expect the learners to behave. Especially at the high school level, I do not expect my students to have everything "figured" out.
  •  
    "3. Demonstrates competence in planning, designing, and incorporating instructional strategies (ITS 3)"
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