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kimgrissom

Implementation in Advocacy/Guidanace/Post-Secondary Preparation (Articles) - 0 views

  • we found that offering options to students also bears risk for the educators.
    • kimgrissom
       
      Wow. This is a great example of learning with student choice that has incredible value but this risk is real and a reason that many schools would likely shy away from this type of encouragement.
  • They also reached beyond the immediate Graham community to forge partnerships, potentially risking their original plan to unforeseen compromises and adaptations, leaving them-selves open to new opportunities.
    • kimgrissom
       
      As a parent, community member, and educator, I love this type of authentic learning. But how does this fit into the standards, required curriculum, high-stakes testing education system we have today? Do these partnerships with the community bring more support to schools or do they open up schools to even more criticism if test results aren't a piece of the puzzle?
  • Providing choice risks failure because when we, as teachers, make all the decisions for our students, lessons will proceed predictably in productive directions; however, when we remove the possibility of students choosing, and choosing wrongly, we fail to aid the students in becoming competent, thoughtful risk takers.
    • kimgrissom
       
      True of the system or district as well...
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  • An environment without risk fails to prepare students for life outside the classroom, a world of risk taking. Allowing students to experience measured risks, in a supportive community, models the real-world paradigm where choices naturally entail risk.
    • kimgrissom
       
      This makes perfect sense to me. It's guided my parenting style and it's a piece of how I have taught as well. It's just a different look at what the can mean.
  • Over 60% of students who eventually dropped out of high school failed at least25% of their credits in the ninth grade, while only 8% of their peers who eventually graduated had similar difficulty.”
    • kimgrissom
       
      This is an interesting statistic that makes me wonder how we can be both responsive to students in this situation and proactive in preventing these kinds of situations.
  • The Silent Epidemic estimates that the government would reap $45 billion in extra tax revenues and reduced costs in public health, crime, and welfare payments if the number of high school dropouts among 20-year olds in the U.S. today were cut in half.
    • kimgrissom
       
      Wow. That is staggering and something I don't think gets talked enough about when it comes to education and finances.
  • It also suggests that educators have not yet found a single approach that comprehensively addresses the needs of all at risk students.
    • kimgrissom
       
      This is true. I think our schools wants online learning to be the magic bullet, but the truth is that online learning is a really great option for some kids. But not all kids will be successful that way either. We need a variety of options for kids.
  • Instead of challenging students to raise their performance to the level they must reach to be successful, too often credit recovery “solutions” have lowered the bar for passing.
    • kimgrissom
       
      Yes. This is real
  • It was not that I didn’t want to go to the school; it was that there was nothing for me to go to.
    • kimgrissom
       
      I'm not sure this is true of all parents, but it's possible that we sell them short based on the little interaction we make possible for parents.
  • The sum of all these experiences was a prelude to his senior year, when he began the process of selecting colleges.
    • kimgrissom
       
      These experiences all sound amazing. But how do they fit into what is required of schools? Is all of this in addition to the learning of "traditional classes"? How does this impact algebra or government class or writing skills? I think it sounds great and would allow students to become well-rounded individuals, but it's hard to understand how a school uses their human and fiscal resources to make this kind of learning available to all students.
jhatcher

Implementation in an Elementary Classroom (Articles) - 0 views

    • jhatcher
       
      This sounds very hard. I wish there were some examples of taking a typical teacher centered lesson and changing it up to include all these features.
  • You will use the model and examples to assist you in establishing a learning goal for this lesson, how to unpack the Common Core State Standards with your learners, design a warm-up activity that will engage specific learners based on the Class Learning Snapshot. You will also universally-design the new vocabulary along with guided and independent activities as the framework of the lesson.
    • jhatcher
       
      This seems very difficult to me. I wish there were some exmples of taking a teacher centered lesson and personalizing it as is explained here.
    • jhatcher
       
      This sticky note is suppose to be on the first article. Don't know why it shows up here! I can't seem to delete it! Sorry.
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  • when she answers students’ questions straightforwardly instead of asking questions to help the students find the answers themselves, she’s actually interfering with the learning process
    • jhatcher
       
      So true and hard not to "help" When I taught 5th grade Science it was fun for me in these type of inquiry lessons. It's different when teaching reading but still can be done when questioning vocabulary or evidence. How do you know is a common questions.
  • During this first instructional phase, noise and activity levels sometimes reach eardrum-piercing levels
    • jhatcher
       
      This is hard... as a teacher you may feel the class is out of control and crazy. I would feel a bit anxious during these times that my kids were so loud. This is a struggle even now.
  • each procedure needs to be practiced 28 times to stick.
    • jhatcher
       
      I have never seen 28 times for a procedure to stick before. I need to be more patient with my students because I know I expect them to understand quicker than this. I will keep this in mind.
  • lan assignments with choices.
    • jhatcher
       
      This is usually fairly easy to do. It seems like most things can be individualized somewhat. I really try to give my students options even if it is small. I think they appreciate it and like the power of some choice.
  • In 5 months you can
    • jhatcher
       
      I like this article because it helps you with change as slow or quick as you want it. This is very helpful
mpercy

Implementation in a Secondary Classroom (Articles) - 0 views

  • in each of the four major academic subjects, students are offered choice as a means to motivate them and to enable them to take charge, even in small ways, of their own education
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This is the ideal, but the logistics are insane. At a former district, the English department tried our own - very pared down - version of this. I like to believe it was a success. We scrapped all the old courses and created entirely new courses based on themes we thought would appeal to teenagers, divided them into 2 framework categories, divided all the 11-12 grade band standards between the courses, and let students choose. They had to take at least one course from each framework before the graduated, so we still covered all the standards. The curriculum and pacing were traditional, but we required at least one literature circle or free choice book per course. At least, in some small ways, students had ownership of their learning.
  • let go and allow the kids to experience the consequences of their choices. And maybe there’s a failure. Maybe a kid was trying to do a vodcast and he couldn’t get the video to work correctly on the computer. That’s a learning opportunity for that child. Because it was his choice, he’s going to try to figure out a way to make it work—sometimes with the help of a fellow student.”
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This 1000%! As a society, we are trained to fear failure, yet we learn most when we fail. Sometimes the difference between future success and failure is learning to cope with past failures in a healthy manner. We're going to keep failing in large and small ways our entire lives. The sooner we learn to cope with and learn from our failures in a healthy way, the better off we are as individuals and a society. The hardest part of this is justifying the "failure" to parents or administrators looking at numbers. As a parent and a teacher, I know how hard it is to tell a parent that their child has failed a course. As a parent, when my own children's teachers have communicated a failure on my children's part, it feels like I'M the one who failed. The same as a teacher, when a student fails my class, I feel like I failed them. Maybe we can relearn about failure and incorporate it into a healthier society for everyone.
    • lwinter14
       
      How do we respond to the students who do not handle failure well? I have students who would see failing as a reason to shut down and not move forward. As many times as I have tried to have that conversation with students that failure can be a learning opportunity, a lot of them still can't see past that moment of "failure." I think that the older students become, the less likely they are willing to take risks that may involve possibilities of failure. And for many of them, they are a lot less likely to let their peers know it.
  • I’m putting together a wiki where my students will have to respond a certain number of times a week to whatever they’ve read. I am going to give them a series of questions like I always do, but they don’t have to respond to those directly. The response will be very open. They can choose instead to respond to someone else’s views. Everybody will read each other’s responses. They’ll have to post a couple of responses—and post a couple of responses to responses— as part of the class.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This seems like a great way to hear the voices that don't normally get heard. It also really connects with and promotes civil online discussion and discourse. THAT is something we desperately need!
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  • Another key piece in preparing personalized curriculum units and projects includes mandates, such as performance standards, standardized texts, and academy themes. If mandates are seen as “something we have to teach,” they become a discouraging burden on teachers. If they are seen as ways to inspire, inform, and lend coherence to planning, they can be seen as useful. Both vertical departmental discussions and horizontal grade-team discussions are useful in mapping and creatively incorporating mandates into curriculum designs.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      A phrase I hear a LOT is "If we aren't teaching what we're supposed to, then just tell us. Don't make us tie everything to standards I didn't write." Unfortunately it seems, that even as educators, we can't move out of the dislike of requirements. :-P. If WE as educated learners don't like mandates and requirements, why in the heck would we think students would? It always boggles my mind when teachers act like the very students they complain about the most.
  • At the end of the project they can choose how they will present their findings
    • tkofoot
       
      I think it is great the students will have a choice on how they want to present their project at the end. I do get feedback from students on what they prefer for projects and presenting them. They are different.
  • with one student working one way, another a different way—you get the picture.
    • tkofoot
       
      This is something I need to learn to get use to, a "disorganized" classroom. I do think it has to do with working in special ed so long. I have a hard time letting kids go as not all of them can handle it. I may need to try letting go a little, but with daily goal for tasks.
  • I would gather up the two paragraphs each student wrote and take them home to read, grade, and turn back in, with nobody else getting the chance to read them.
    • tkofoot
       
      I am learning a lot of different ways for presentation through the Ollie courses. I like that it doesn't have to be just a written response as this had been a barrier for some students in the past.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      I think that this tool we are using here could also be useful. If you have students post their work to a site like this, and then use this tool, I wonder it you could get students collaborating across different teams or even grade levels I recently used it with the other 8th grade team so they could see how students on the other team were learning the same content. It was really cool for them to make connections to each other's work and I think it helped increase the "realness" because they were explaining their thinking to their peers.
  • they loved doing it because it was a break from math!
    • tkofoot
       
      Math can be fun. The math teacher I work with tries to get the kids moving and doing activities other than pencil to paper. Kids benefit from seeing what math can look like in the real world, like creating a graph.
  • It is a messier way to teach, though it takes more organization on the teacher’s part, not less. You really have to be on top of things to allow the students choice since now there is more than one “right” way of doing something in the classroom.
    • lwinter14
       
      I think that this is something that both teachers and students likely struggle with at first. Because it looks so different, teachers really have to be prepared to help 28 different students on any one thing. At the same time, students have to be comfortable with knowing that there isn't that one way of doing things to get it right. I've spoken with some of my students and I ask them what they would be interested in studying if they had some more choice and a lot of them give me the traditional "idk" answer. They want choices, but then when asked what they might choose, they realize that the decision isn't as simple.
  • I won’t lie. The journey from old school to new learning paradigm was bumpy at first. I tried blended lessons that took less time than planned, had technology failures, chose the wrong method of delivery for various types of content or skills, and generally made every mistake you can imagine.
    • lwinter14
       
      I've definitely had some struggles along the way with trying to set up a more blended classroom. Even small things that I thought were set up correctly in Moodle and then when students go to access them, I find out I forgot to do something. However, the small successes when things go well do make the effort to shift thigns worth it. I do try to listen to the students who provide input beyond the usual complaints because they know what works best from their perspective.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      I hear you. I hope 9th graders are little more forgiving when things don't quiet right. Most of my bumps in the road have been setting up different types of forums. I agree the some students have provided good and useful feedback that I've used to make my Moodle site better. I can also relate the authors comment about the wrong delivery methods. I have already gone back and changed some lessons and activity types. Hopefully next year will go smoother.
    • mpercy
       
      There is definitely a learning curve as you begin to blend or flip your classroom. It's great that you are using student feedback to make decisions as you continue to change your classroom.
  • Now they have access to the full unit from the beginning, so they can gauge their own pacing and get practice in time management. Completion rules also give me the freedom to have small-group or individual conferences to assess learning and make choices about future instruction.
    • lwinter14
       
      This sounds like such a freeing way to operate a classroom. I would love to have students move through things at their own pace so that I have the opportunity to meet with small groups or individual students based on their needs. It makes me uncomfortable though, because I cannot imagine being able to have a full unit ready ahead of time that students can go ahead and dive into. I'm guessing this teacher had a curriculum that was well developed because sometimes I am planning things as I go. I also how this works from a perspective of science teaching? How does a teacher manage multiple labs within one day or anticipate when labs would be needed at times? Perhaps there is more structure that would be needed for those days and deadlines to where all students need to be at a certain point so that the whole group can do a lab and then they go back to moving at their own pace?
  • Since the project focuses on student learning that is engaging and relevant, we asked the teachers to tell us about ways they are using choice to involve students in content learning.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      This is such an important part in the path toward helping students take charge in their own education. Getting student voice is key. I think that too often we forget this aspect and for the most part our educational system hasn't changes a whole lot. Most of our classrooms still look like they did 100 years ago and yet the "real world" had moved beyond that. What future will our students have if they can't or won't take a hold of their own education and become invested?
  • So far the teachers have talked about choice in terms of curriculum, but choice can also, surprisingly, come into play in relation to discipline. In her first years of teaching, Julie, like just about every other teacher, would confront students sitting near each other who either were having too good a time socializing or were fighting. In either case, she would separate them by sending one to another part of the classroom. Not anymore. Now she says, “One of you needs to move. You decide.” It is less stressful to her and focuses the students on what they need to do to regain control. And if students require more serious discipline, Julie again usually offers them choices: “They could be two ‘bad’ choices; for example, one of them might be to go to the principal’s office and the other to stay in a specific teacher’s room. But if they have a choice, they’ll pick one; they take ownership.”
    • jnewmanfd
       
      I just plain like this part. Making the students choose. I use this a lot and for the most part is works. Sure, sometimes the student makes the wrong choice or the choice I wish they wouldn't, but it's their choice. They are the ones who have to deal with the consequences good or bad. It is also nice at the teacher when students want to complain about the situation. You simply say, well that was you're choice, and again you put the ownership back on them.
  • Instead of just giving a final exam at the end of each unit, I try to use formative assessment to enable me to give my students guidance and assistance when they need it. I use a variety of methods for this. For instance, my video lectures often include interactive questions to assess their understanding of the material. And our classroom is often noisy and active as we play a round of Kahoot, which gives me ins
    • jnewmanfd
       
      The assess as you go is something I've been trying to do more of this year. I haven't waited until the end to do one big assessment, but rather, I've done several smaller ones. For the most part, student don't always realize they are being assessed as the smaller pieces seem to fit seamlessly with our current activities. I think it is easier for me as a instructor to make needed changes on our learning course before it's too late. What I need work on next would be getting meaningful feedback to students. Getting better, but it's not where I want it yet.
  • Low motivation does not need to be a recurring problem in the classroom. Although teachers can draw from myriad strategies to cultivate higher levels of motivation, well crafted choices have the potential to have a powerful impact on students’ attitudes toward classroom work. When promoting student decision making, it is important to remember that some of the most motivating choices are those that promote feelings of control, competence, and purpose. Certainly, giving choice to students often mea
    • jnewmanfd
       
      I would say that this year, I am hurting big time in the area. My group last year loved it and they really excelled. They got to the point that they wanted to explore on their own. My group this year just doesn't want to take charge of their learning and seeks the easiest way out of work. They say things like, "...just tell us the answer or can we just read an article or something". I'll keep pushing them because I know it's worth it, but man it's a struggle.
  • All of this guidance helped me find more effective ways to lead my students while empowering them to take responsibility for their own learning.
    • mpercy
       
      The goal of blended learning: giving students the tools and encouraging them to become self-motivated learners!
  • they can access and even return to my videos and screencasts when they need them most, as they are working on an assignment or reviewing for a test.
    • mpercy
       
      This is a great resource for students to have at their convenience. All of the instruction can be viewed at any time.
  • I feel that I am on this blended learning journey with them, and I truly believe it has made us all more engaged in our work and more focused learners.
    • mpercy
       
      Teachers have an opportunity to model being a life long learner by looking for ways to adjust their classrooms to create a more engaging environment for students. It's great to model this for students.
tkofoot

Adaptive Learning System Articles - 0 views

  • Most students learn pretty quickly that a Google search will yield some results that aren’t helpful and adjust accordingly.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      Sorry, I could resist this sentence. It's okay with me if it doesn't count towards my post, but I have to admit to laughing when I read this one. I'm not sure that most students get this today, I mean I hope they do, but the conversations I've had the past few years when students search things are scary.
  • Adaptive learning technologies are potentially transformative in that they may be able to change the economics of tutoring. Imagine if every student in your class could have a private tutor, available to them at any time for as long as they need.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      I think this is the most eye opening factor within adaptive learning. It helps provide equity that is often missing when it comes to education. We know, that for the most part, our low social economic students preform lower than their counterparts. Which makes sense if you need tutoring and can't afford it. Adaptive learning technology has the potential to help schools bridge those gaps. It can help provide an equal opportunity for all. The point of, adaptive technologies acting like tutors, hadn't occurred to me before. As someone who needed tutoring in math as a young student, but came from a home where that wasn't feasible, I can appreciate the usefulness of adaptive technology.
  • Adaptive learning has long been a part of education. The basic concept is simple: Coursework should be adapted to meet the individual needs of each student. Every teacher has experience modifying curriculum in some way to help students access information. Nowadays technology can help make the adaptations easier and more streamlined.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      Thinking about this first part and segments from the previous article, I would say that this idea would be a life saver. Sure, I realize that some students need more support than others, and sure I realize ways to give them the support they need, but how do I go about accomplishing such a daunting task? I often feel like that, at times, I'm running around with my head cut off. I can support student A who is struggling with seeing the connection from last weeks lessons to our current ones, but student B is so advanced that he's bored and tired of waiting so he's acting up instead, student C hasn't been to school in 8 days and has no idea where were at, and the list just goes on from there. I try to manage what I can by breaking students into groups, focusing on the larger picture, but I still realize that at many times, I'm falling short. If it can help assist me in meeting the needs of individual students, then I'm all for it. Later in the article it also talks about how it helps limit students from giving up. I think we can all agree, that's a huge bonus. My only unanswered questions are when to use it, how often, and at what point in the learning process? I've never used adaptive learning before, so I have lots to learn.
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  • n fact, it many strengthen instruction as faculty take on a more supporting, coaching role, with less time devoted to delivery of content, which students may or may not already have mastered, and more time focused on one-to-one student engagement and self-paced guidance through a curriculum.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      When I read the first sentence, I was a little offended. I'm glad I kept reading, I like this part a lot. I think that these moments, when students are working independently, are the moments where we truly get to know our students. I often feel like I don't have enough time to talk with my students about their learning. In fact, I often make lists of who I've talked to recently and who I haven't so I can get to them next time. The idea that adaptive learning can help me become an effective facilitator of learning is intriguing.
  • "One of the benefits of adaptive learning is that it frees up faculty members to spend more time with students, to work with them in small groups and individually, essentially flipping the classroom," Johnson said. "We see this [approach] as part of a much bigger pedagogical picture. The technology is a tool that gets us to our goal of rehumanizing our large classes."
    • jnewmanfd
       
      I've already commented on the idea and benefits of time in prior articles. Although I like the idea of having more time to work and actually talk with students, I wondered something a bit different when I read about teacher's time in this article. Along with freeing up teacher time to do the things that, I would think all of us got into education for in the first place, would adaptive technologies also help with teacher burnout? What about the fact that in our state, enrollment in teacher education programs are down at all three regent schools? I can't recall the exact reasons why teachers burn out and quit, but I'm fairly sure that time with actually working students is one of them. I hear from many new teachers say that they didn't realize how hard it was going to be to the meet the needs of every student. I wonder if data would show whether or not these systems would help with getting and retaining teachers.
  • They might help a student get unstuck on a particular step that he hasn’t quite understood.
    • tkofoot
       
      I have used IXL math with students. I like how it shows students the correct way to complete the program.
  • tools t
    • tkofoot
       
      I think the word "tools" is important to point out. It is not instruction, but an additional resource.
  • the notion of adaptive learning technologies can be abused as a kind of magic incantation by the reductionists.
    • tkofoot
       
      Not only abused without enough extra teaching, but used as a whole education system. There are already teachers that turn students over to programs as a way to teach without any other type of interaction. I am not ready for this as a parent or teacher.
  • work that is not replicable by a machine.
    • tkofoot
       
      The adaptive learning can help support learning and free up teachers to get around to more students that need individualized instruction.
mpercy

PLE Articles - 3 views

  • Write and Store Notes
    • lwinter14
       
      This seems like a tool that would be effective for all of my students. Most of them still take notes in their science notebooks--but a few have dabbled in writing their notes digitally. The problem I see with this is that they write them in separate google documents and then do not find a way to organize them so that they can access them easily when needed. This could be a good tool for them to learn early in their high school career and then carry it on as they get into courses with a larger need for note-taking.
  • The employ of PLEs in the classroom can go horribly wrong if teachers fail to prepare students and set usage parameters.
    • lwinter14
       
      This is definitely something that I would worry about with my students initially. Because they are used to having technology, I sometimes take for granted the skills I expect them to have when it comes to using different sites. Moodle has been a bigger learning curve for my students than expected, so I know that I would definitely need to prepare my students for setting up and using PLE first. Which also means that I need to feel comfortable explaining what it is and how it works to my students as well.
  • our work must increasingly attend to supporting students in developing their skills and motivations for becoming themselves networked and sophisticated online learners.
    • lwinter14
       
      I find this becoming more and more true the longer I teach. My frustration comes from where to start in supporting students so that they can become more sophisticated in learning online. For example, I use Moodle for my courses rather than Google Classroom and I run into more hesitation and complaints from students than I anticipated because it is "something different." I'm not sure if it is because only a small subset of teachers are currently pushing their students outside of their comfort zones when it comes to online learning and that's where the pushback is, but I feel like we need more teachers to buy into changing the landscape of online learning beyond Google Classroom. I feel like only then will students start to develop those skills and abilities to grow in their capacity as online learners.
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  • Teachers are challenged to provide the appropriate balance between structured lessons and learner autonomy in order to facilitate self-directed learning.
    • lwinter14
       
      This is definitely a balance that I am still trying to find within my classroom and even one that I think my students are trying to figure out. There are some days where they would rather take control on their own, but other days when they want to be given more structure and told what to do or how to do something. I think this balance is hard to find depending on the particular student because some really struggle with the autonomy provided in online learning and still need those additional structures in place. Is there a formula to follow in terms of finding that balance? Does the balance vary from class-to-class depending on your students or can it be a one-size-fits-all approach? These are things I know I will figure out in time, but it can be frustrating at first.
  • teachers must pursue training and be knowledgeable of how to utilize PLEs
    • jhatcher
       
      I agree with the comment above wholeheartedly. I think this is what caused my genius hour plan to not be what I had hoped a couple years ago. I saw weak projects and kids not very motivated. This is what I want to make sure does not happen again. I just wonder will I really be prepared and confident? Will I have learned enough? Hope so!
  • Symbaloo or NetVibesas a foundation to help learners create and maintain their personal learning environments.
  • Others utilize sites such as
    • jhatcher
       
      I use Sybaloo and can definitely see how its use by students as they are creating/ learning in Personalized Learning would be useful.
  • I could stand to be more savvy in my own organizing of online learning and networking: I’ve been slow to use tools and develop skills for managing online resource, such as the use of vehicles like Symbaloo, Evernote, or Diigo, and I want to take inspiration from the 7th grade student in the video above to move forward in this way and learn and practive better these skills and with these tools.
    • kimgrissom
       
      This is true for a lot of teachers--I think we are often slow to set up our own professional learning tools whether that's joining a professional learning network via an LMS, Twitter, or just tools to help us organize our own resources.
  • Students engaging in networked learning have to learn to be more self-directed than in the typical classroom
    • kimgrissom
       
      Yes, passive learning doesn't get far in personal learning so we have to find ways to change the narrative and train learners to understand a new set of "success criteria." What used to look like being a good student won't work as well.
  • as an instructor, you can make a webmix quite interactive
    • kimgrissom
       
      I've used symbaloo as a way to organize myself and I've even put together webmixes on a specific professional development topic before. Reading about Symbaloo in this context makes me rethink how this tool might be helpful in personalized learning. Building in interaction is a really interesting idea I had never considered.
  • Not every student is ready for this responsibility, so teachers need to have strategies in place to guide and support these learner
    • kimgrissom
       
      What does that look like? Explicit expectations for what learning looks like, encouragement, assistance and tutorials for tools, formative check-ins to see how things are going and offer guidance. There's a lot to think about .
  • A PLE is the method students use to organize their self-directed online learning, including the tools they employ to gather information, conduct research, and present their findings.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This makes a PLE sound more like an LMS or organizational tool - which I am in desperate need of! We assume students can work through a linear progression, but even adults struggle with that! I know I'm guilty of putting more emphasis and effort into WHAT students will learn rather than HOW they will learn or what the EXPERIENCE will be like.
  • facilitation of students’ “active role in the learning process” and teachers’ provision of the right balance between structured lessons and autonomy; let’s never forget it is an ongoing balancing act. 
    • Wendy Arch
       
      One thing I also do is forget that students have lives outside of my class. I set what I think is a reasonable amount of time for a task - but neglect to acknowledge that I'm basing that time estimate on my own abilities or on previous experiences in a face-to-face setting where students (and I) could get fairly immediate feedback on the learning (or lack thereof) occurring. While we have to balance between structured lesson and autonomy, we also have to balance between what can feasibly be done by students all alone versus students being actively guided in person.
  • Susan and I loved that students could organize their Netvibes portals in a way that made sense to them and that a page could contain a diverse range of information streams:  a webpage, an embedded document, a RSS feed, a database widget, the link tool that made a webpage “live” within the Netvibes page.  Not only could students organize information, but they could also publish content they were creating through tools like Google Docs and VoiceThread as well as original works, such as artwork and videos.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      Ideally, this sounds a lot like the WIki feature on many LMS. Our school uses PowerSchool, which offers a student Wiki option that allows students the same features. I can see Netvibes being a great alternative if a school doesn't yet have an LMS or uses a not fully featured LMS.
  • What Are the Potential Issues With PLEs?
    • Wendy Arch
       
      An issue i don't see addressed directly below is the issue of students accessing or pulling inappropriate or inaccurate content. Maybe this falls under the "Not every student is ready for the responsibility" category. Depending on the age range, students could so easily get lost in "fake news" or general misinformation, so there would have to be appropriate media and tech literacy lessons provided.
  • The concept of PLE is not a way to replace classroom learning, but to enhance it
    • mpercy
       
      As I have been reading information on the PLE, it often seems like a complete overhaul of the current educational system is necessary. It is good to hear that is not the case but changes can be made to improve the current classroom environment.
  • Some instructors empower students to use their own mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones as a means to create PLEs
    • mpercy
       
      It is really ideal to have students use their smartphones to enhance their learning rather than distracting their learning!
  • PLEs place a large amount of responsibility on students and thus requires a high level of self-management and awareness.
    • mpercy
       
      This is a big concern as I see many students that don't display self-motivation and desire to achieve at a high level. Will they be successful in this environment or get left behind?
  • Teachers, she explains, are no longer the primary or even the best source of information available to students,
    • mpercy
       
      The role of teacher has completely changed since I first entered the profession. As we encourage our students to be life long learners, we have the opportunity to show them what that means.
Wendy Arch

"Personalized" vs. "Personal" Learning - 2 views

  • The tasks have been personalized for kids, not created by them.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      At this point in the article, I have many thoughts floating around. One major thought comes to mind. Can we ever fully personalize our classrooms? I get the points given here, but as a functioning society don't we have to conform a little bit? As parents, I think we do this to our children more than most of us would like to admit and certainly our schools follow suit. Also this first line here, isn't this what state standards do? Provide some sort of standardized leaning? Or is it simply saying that kids should be able to design how they will progress through a certain standard? A student chooses his or her own path to the end. However, if is a standard of no interest to me and you make me do it anyway is that truly personal learning? I'm starting to feel like flip flopping politician.
  • folly of believing that everything can and should be reduced to numbers.[7
    • jnewmanfd
       
      This seems to go against our current reality in my school. We're told that everything has to be data driven or evidence based. On the surface that makes sense, but my issue has always been that we are dealing with people not things. We work in a system filled with a multitude of variables and I would agree that there is a folly in believing that everything can be reduced to numbers. The more I read this article, the more I am thinking that we might be looking at turning the traditional school upside down on it's head.
  • Our kids (and we ourselves) are suddenly walking around with access to the sum of human knowledge in our pockets and connections to literally millions of potential teachers. It’s a dramatic shift that requires new literacies to navigate all that access and, importantly, new dispositions to take advantage of it for learning.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      Yes, our kids today are walking around with infinite knowledge at their finger tips. Yes, they don't know how to use it and when they are provided the opportunity, they don't seem to use it. I'm not saying that they can't or won't. I'm saying that from my experiences, they are trained not to do so. So many students do not realize their own potential for learning. They want to wait for the teacher to tell them what to do, what the correct answer is, or how to go about a particular task. Maybe we trained them too well. I 500% agree that we need to teach this skill. I also know that I have struggled to do this myself. If asked, I would have say, no I don't how to teach these new literacy skills. It's talked about, but I haven't seen any real professional development on the subject. If you know of any, please share.
    • lwinter14
       
      I couldn't agree more with your ideas about students not knowing how to use the knowledge. Sometimes they ask me the simplest question and are offended that I don't have the answer for them. To which I ask, how could you find the answer? I feel as though they only take advantage of having that knowledge at their fingertips when it's a direct benefit to them and seems simpler than relying on someone else for the information. I encourage so many of my students to think through investigations for themselves and to try and come up with possible answers first. So many of them want to sit and wait for me to tell them everything and haven't realized how much more power there is in learning it if they put in the cognitive effort first. Coming from the same district, I also don't know how we teach them how to persevere through that when they just want to take the easy route, but there have to be some strategies out there that help to break down that "instant gratification mindset."
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  • Personalization is often used in the ed-tech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace. The only choice a student gets is what box to check on the screen and how quickly to move through the exercises.
    • jnewmanfd
       
      Yikes and ouch. Time for some personal reflection. I would say that I have done exactly this. I'm also fairly sure that personalized learning is what I would have called it. Letting students move at their own pace and not be anchored down by others in the classroom. I agree with most of this article. In fact it sounds like an utopia classroom. Students working on problems in their own way, connecting their own dots, learning new skills so they self progress along their chosen path.... At the end of reading though, I'm right back to my roadblock. How do I even begin to manage this or set it up in the first place? Thinking from the science view, we use a lot of materials and supplies, having to have these items available gives me enough anxiety alone.
  • but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance.’
    • lwinter14
       
      I often wrestle with these different questions/thoughts from a high school perspective. Personalization seems like a great way to reach each individual students' interests and needs, but the logistics of measuring progress always surface. How do we ensure students are still meeting all of the state standards and critera so that they can earn a credit that is satisfactory for graduation? How do we make sure that things are coded appropriately so that those courses are recognized by post-secondary institutions? How do we allow personalization but don't limit it because of the need to be compliant for some things?
    • mpercy
       
      I really think to implement a system which uses a personalized approach, the whole system by which we operate would need to be changed. High school graduation requirements would need to be adjusted as well as college entrance requirements.
  • A personalized environment gives students the freedom to follow a meaningful line of inquiry, while building the skills to connect, synthesize and analyze information into original productions.
    • lwinter14
       
      This sounds like a great opportunity for a lot of my students, but I'm not sure it will also fit every student's needs. The more flexible schedule and choice inherent within it worries me about some of my students who really struggle with staying on task and making progress. I wonder how much structure would need to be embedded for these students and would it alter it to the point that it wouldn't be considered personalized?
    • mpercy
       
      In theory, giving students a choice in what and how they learn would eliminate the need to keep them focused and on track. However, we have students in our classrooms today we know would struggle with this! As with any method of teaching, there would be students that would love it and thrive while others would struggle and need more intervention. Not every individual could learn this way.
  • She cautions educators who may be excited about the progressive educational implications for “personalized learning” to make sure everyone they work with is on the same page about what that phrase means.
    • lwinter14
       
      There are certainly some changes that need to happen on a macro level if we want to reach our students in the optimal way. State assessments would need to change, the way that colleges rate students may need to be different and even the way college is taught could have implications. What happens if we are teaching these high schoolers in innovative ways that are truly personalized, but then a students ends up in a freshmen lecture hall with 300 students and is put back into that cookie-cutter scenario? Will they be prepared with the skills to handle that?
    • tkofoot
       
      I agree with you. We find ourselves teaching for the standardized tests. We need to find out what the expectations are in college to ensure kids are learning skills that allow them to succeed in all classroom settings.
  • However, in order to navigate the system of accountability in the U.S. educational system, many school district leaders require public school educators to teach a specific curriculum that will be evaluated on standardized tests
    • mpercy
       
      This is a big hurdle to overcome if we are to adopt a personalized learning environment. How can we make sure that students know the curriculum they will be evaluated on before going on to college or other programs after high school. Can they still demonstrate success on these tests?
    • jhatcher
       
      My school as adopted EL Reading LA curriculum. It is very scripted and all kids read 4 books through the year. Choice in reading has really taken the backseat. No room for personalized learning here.
  • Technology was strikingly absent from these conversations.
    • mpercy
       
      This surprises me as it has been a focus for many districts to become 1:1 with technology. I would think that to become more personalized technology would need to be implemented.
  • After decades of this approach, it is clear that all children don’t learn the same way and personalization seems to honor those differences.
    • jhatcher
       
      Educators know this and have for a long time. We know our students have changed. I'm so glad to be in this class but I do not feel my administrators will support this because it is not going to fit into their mold- I can statements, success criteria, evaluation. Personalized learing is different!
  • because of the larger preoccupation with data data data data data
    • kimgrissom
       
      I love Alfie Kohn but this is a scathing assessment of the data-based movement. I get that not all things can and should be reduced to numbers and I tend to agree with his assessment of the dangers of these things being our focus. However, there has to be some way to see if we're making progress other than just individual feelings.
  • One final caveat: in the best student-centered, project-based education, kids spend much of their time learning with and from one another. Thus, while making sense of ideas is surely personal, it is not exclusively individual because it involves collaboration and takes place in a community.
    • kimgrissom
       
      I think this is a very important point as I think about personalized learning and what it might look like. My understanding of personalized doesn't exclude collaboration, but there are models that have the potential to be isolating.
  • We don’t need personalization as much as we need to promote and give opportunities for our kids to do personal learning. And while they come from the same root, those two words are vastly different. “Personalized” learning is something that we do to kids; “personal” learning is something they do for themselves.
    • kimgrissom
       
      To me, this is the most important point in all three of these articles. But this is such a complex issue in schools today. The pressure of all that students must learn and be prepared for has led us to a place where there is far less personal learning in schools. And at the same time, it would probably be more efficient (time-wise) to let project-based, personal learning meet the standards BUT we've also gotten to a place where funding cuts mean it's almost impossible to move away from the industrial model because the more personal project-based model requires more and different human resources. In other words, at the same time that there is more to learn and more concern about students having the engagement and perseverance to get there, we have less money to rebuild a system that currently gets us by with high student to teacher ratio.
  • If we can’t engage our kids in ideas and explorations that require no technology, then we have surely lost our way. Big questions, passion, personal interest are what should drive our use of technology, not the other way around.
    • kimgrissom
       
      Yes. This. So much of this. To me, this is what I love about the Blend/Flip cohort and AIW. Both of these concepts start with the kids and the content and how to engage them in the real ideas at the heart of the matter and then look at the best way of getting students to that goal with or without technology.
  • describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace. The only choice a student gets is what box to check on the screen and how quickly to move through the exercises.
    • tkofoot
       
      This reminds me of the online courses I have observed students complete over the past few years.
  • When that happens, the structures around the classroom leave little room for the kind of authentic, whole-child personalization many teachers dream of offering.
    • tkofoot
       
      I know it is hard for me to give up structure with my Special Education students. This may be easier in personalized learning with students that have learned the skills to self-regulate and stay on task.
  • truly personalized learning experience requires student choice, is individualized, meaningful and resource rich.
    • tkofoot
       
      I think we have students that will be successful with this learning. Some students may not be prepared. How do we determine which students can be successful?
  • It’s as if engaging them in learning without technology has become this impossible task.
    • tkofoot
       
      I do not believe in just the Google classroom. I believe in engaging students with the community, books, and conversation.
  • animates “competency-based progression,” “mastery learning,” and programs that tweak the “delivery of instruction.”
    • Wendy Arch
       
      Could this also be at the center of the difference between credit recovery online/personalized learning and more robust project-based/personalized learning? If a program's goal is to get students the bare minimum of credits for a basic diploma (ala GED), then this style might make sense. If we're thinking of a broader, system-wide approach, then this attitude it definitely at the heart of a lot of fears about the automatization of education.
  • Simpler strategies, such as having kids choose, read, and discuss real books from the library may be more effective
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This is what lives at the core of my department's belief in individual reading. Every Friday, students in English 9, English 10, English 11/12, and American Literature read a book of their choice. There are no assignments attached. This "simpler strategy" is based on Kelly Gallahger's work in Readicide.
  • By assigning the lecture at home, we’re still in charge of delivering the curriculum, just at a different time.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      THIS!!!! THIS 1000% times over! It takes twice if not three times as long to prepare a flipped lesson than a live lecture. This is a point most people don't want to talk about. We're still putting in the time and effort -- it just changes to outside of class time -- which puts the onus on us. Instead of completing the majority of my work during the school day, I'm completing the majority of it outside of school in the evenings and weekends.
  • The assumption here is that curriculum can be broken into little pieces, that skills are acquired sequentially and can be assessed with discrete, contrived tests and reductive rubrics.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      Is this not what Standards Based/Referenced Grading believes? I am not at a SRG school, so I haven't gone through the process. My experience comes with a testing/data collection software our school is piloting called Performance Matters. All questions are tied to standards and wrapped up nicely-packaged in pretty color-coded data to allow teachers to quickly assess and regroup students based on ability or skill-demonstration. This sounds great - an easy to push students who already know the material and help students who don't - but it is testing actual growth or just test taking ability?
jhatcher

Create a personal learning environment with Symbaloo | Instructional Design Fusions - 0 views

  • webmixes.
    • lkmace
       
      Not familiar with webmixes? I'll need some further understanding with this. I'm excited to have more tech tools to use as my students are connected to their ChromeBooks 24/7.
  • Symbaloo is a visual, social bookmarking tool that makes it easy to access your personal knowledge management tools.
    • jhatcher
       
      After reading through this information, the designers were very explicit with the how to videos and directions. It seems very simple to use. I think my students could easily use this and create their own board of tiles.
jhatcher

How To Create a Personal Learning Environment to Stay Relevant in 2013 | Online Learnin... - 0 views

  • PLEs will help instructors not only stay relevant in his or her field, but will provide an opportunity to learn how to use tools that will enhance instructional methods and adapt to the changing paradigm.
    • katie50009
       
      I beleive this is key for all educators---we must all be learning and growing everyday as educators. If we stop growing or looking for ways to improve, or believe that we don't have to, we fall short for our students
  • Create a diagram of the PLE. The purpose of the diagram is to provide a framework for learning goals, identify tools and provide a digital footprint and record of the PLE.
    • lkmace
       
      Wondering if a way to involve students with the design of their PLEs could start here with students creating a diagram that maps their interests and selecting Web 2.0 tools.
  • Our understanding of learning has expanded at a rate that has far outpaced our conceptions of teaching. A growing appreciation for the porous boundaries between the classroom and life experience…has created not only promising changes but also disruptive moments in teaching.
    • edgerlyj1
       
      This is such a key idea in educational technology. Our understanding about how people learn has exploded, thanks to lots of new research about the brain. However, research on teaching isn't quite there yet, so there are a lot of us who aren't sure the best way to implement technology to achieve the highest levels of success for our students.
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  • The Instructor’s role has changed. The learner is moving to the center of the learning and teaching model, and relies upon a variety of sources for learning.
    • edgerlyj1
       
      What makes this harder is that this reality has not made it's way into the minds of many parents. Parents had very traditional experiences and they therefore tend to think and believe that it should still be that way, when in fact, our reality has changed. It's hard when parents make comments to students about what the classroom and teacher should be like....
  • Determine which Web 2.0
    • edgerlyj1
       
      This can be quite the challenge because there are tons of new Web 2.0 tools coming out each year (seemingly every month!). It's hard to keep on top of and be able to diligently choose which tools will meet the intended need best.
    • jhatcher
       
      I agree with this! How to keep up? As teachers we have asked for our District to have coaches usher the best new apps to the teachers to try in our classroom. It's too hard to keep up on what we could be using. So far that idea has not really happened. Maybe it just has not happened YET?
Wendy Arch

Personalizing flipped engagement | SmartBrief - 1 views

  • "Personalized" learning is something that we do to kids; "personal" learning is something they do for themselves.
    • Wendy Arch
       
      This is a great way to look at/describe the differences to colleagues who haven't jumped on the blended/flipped/online learning journey. We hit this problem with Independent Reading. As English teachers, we view this time as "personalized" learning that prompts growth in reading as Kelly Gallagher describes in Readicide (https://www.stenhouse.com/content/readicide). We hope for personal learning, but the students frequently just see it as pointless down time since they would rather be on their phones.
  • If we can't engage our kids in ideas and explorations that require no technology, then we have surely lost our way.
jessed44

Blog - 0 views

benrobison

Screen Recorder & Video Editor | Screencast-O-Matic - 0 views

  •  
    This is a great site that can be used a number of different ways. It's a great way to use the computer and demonstrate how to use an online program to students. The program records your voice while and whatever program you are looking at on the screen.
mdickey95

How to Use Technology to Support ELLs in Your Classroom | Common Sense Education - 0 views

  •  
    Technology use is a great way to support ELs.
mdickey95

Learn ESL Online | Resources for ESL Students - 1 views

  •  
    This is a great source for online resources for English Learners
mdickey95

ol101-s2020: Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 0 views

  • Designs the structure of the course and the presentation of the content to best enhance student learning, including using unit/lesson overviews and reviews, using patterns in lesson sequencing, and using appropriate visual web design techniques (SREB C.14, Varvel V.F)
    • benrobison
       
      I find this to be most important in regards to meeting the needs and/or learning styles of multiple/different learners.
  • Promotes learning through online collaboration group work that is goal-oriented and focused (SREB C.5, Varvel V.I)
    • benrobison
       
      This sets apart a quality online learning situation, rather than a work at your own pace, or checklist class, in which authentic learning probably isn't happening.
  • Provides substantive, timely, and constructive feedback to students (SREB D.8, Varvel VI.F, ITS 5.e)
    • benrobison
       
      I believe that (specifically the timely) part is critical for online teaching/learning success! Since there is such a lag-time with communication in the online setting vs. the face-to-face setting, timely feedback can ease that isolation a bit.
    • blodgett
       
      Totally agree, a week goes by before you know it, and if a student isn't in front of you, the feedback can get 'lost'.
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  • Establishes standards for student behavior that are designed to ensure academic integrity and appropriate use of the internet and written communication (SREB E.2)
    • benrobison
       
      Establishing netiquette standards from the outset will help participants be more successful. This is true of all ages, but in my opinion, these should be more stringent for the younger (high school/middle school) audience.
  • • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies (SREB J.7, ITS 1.c)
    • blodgett
       
      Continuous evaluation when you can't always see their faces to see that 'I don't get it look' is a critical part to teaching and reteaching.
  • • Assists students with technology used in the course (Varvel III.C)
    • blodgett
       
      This is one of the key reasons I'm taking this course. I want to understand what technology is used so I can make sure I have a support structure in place for both teachers and students.
  • intellectual property rights and fair use
    • blodgett
       
      I get asked this question all the time. Google image search has made it WAY to easy to grab anyone's content regardless of who really owns it.
  • Understands and uses data from assessments to guide instruction
    • jessed44
       
      Using an LMS such as Moodle can be helpful in not only scoring assessments, but helping to organize the data and determining which items students need further instruction with.
    • jessed44
       
      Using an LMS such as Moodle can be helpful not only for scoring assessments but for organizing the data so the teacher can make sense of it and help students accordingly.
  • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students
    • jessed44
       
      I think that while professional development on pedagogy is important, sometimes our training on knowledge of the content gets overshadowed. This is too bad because the more I have learned about my content, I have been able to come up with more creative ways to teach it!
  • Communicates with students effectively and consistently
    • jessed44
       
      I often wonder about the right amount of communication with students in an online setting. Obviously you want some, but can there be too much?
    • jessed44
       
      I sometimes wonder about the appropriate amount of communication in an online course. Obviously we want some, but we also want students to work on independent problem solving as well. For example, how often do I need to respond to discussion posts? There is no way I can respond to all of them in a meaningful way.
  • Aligns assessment with course objectives
    • jessed44
       
      It is so vital to make sure we assess students fairly and that the assessments are truly what we want students to be able to do, otherwise students can get frustrated and not see the point in what we are having them do.
    • jessed44
       
      It is so vital to make sure that our assessments clearly align with what we actually want students to do. Otherwise, many students the tasks are meaningless busy work and will not be motivated to do them. Clear articulation is key!
  • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the course (Varvel VI.F)
    • mdickey95
       
      This is the best way to increase student engagement. When students know the instructor uses their feedback to make adjustments to the course, it is powerful.
  • Tailors instruction to meet the different needs of students, including different learning styles, different interests and backgrounds, and students with special needs or whom are language learners (SREB C.7, Varvel V.H, ITS 4.c)
    • mdickey95
       
      Because it takes more effort to get to know students online (not face to face) this may take a lot of effort at first. An experienced online instructor may be able to make some generalizations but a new instructor would need to consider how to determine the needs of the group in a particular cohort when designing a course.
  • Creates a learning community that encourages collaboration and interaction, including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content (SREB D.2, Varvel VII.B, ITS 6.a)
    • mdickey95
       
      It would be easy to create a course in which a student interacts only with articles and websites. It takes more thought and creativity to make sure interaction is built in to the class.
  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student (SREB F.1, Varvel II.E)
    • mdickey95
       
      It would be very difficult to teach an online course if an instructor has never taken one. This would be helpful in knowing how to be proactive with students instead of being reactive to their issues.
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