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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Heather Whitman

Heather Whitman

Implementation in Advocacy/Guidanace/Post-Secondary Preparation (Articles) - 0 views

    • Heather Whitman
       
      I love this idea as we need to instill the need to be a part of organizations/communities/initiatives. What partnerships could be developed to push this for those going into the military, trades, and lifeskills students? I would love to see an idea of a plan of what this looks like.
  • these attributes can also remove the social stigma of credit recovery.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Confidence is certainly an issue for struggling students. Why would they want to look different? I hadn't thought about the privacy of online learning in regards to people not knowing what was and wasn't done. If I need extra help, I can ask it in a different way and not look "dumb" or if I need time because I had to work all weekend,I can still meet expectations and push myself.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Online learning helps with the digital divide and gives needed exposure to various online uses. We can't assume they have technology let alone know how to search and use online skills/tasks.
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  • The advocate leader uses his or her influence and energy to protect students’ rights and interests
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This stood out at me. I am naturally reflective and always think what can I do better, what did I not do to reach a child when there is an issue. This can be tricky as some staff members may not feel the principal is backing the teachers/staff when he/she is advocating strongly for the students. This area is tricky, and you have to be there for the kids and always push for the best.
Heather Whitman

PLE Articles - 3 views

  • PLE by creating blogs, wikispaces, prezi presentations and photo collages as final projects; thereby diversifying instruction.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This is where I get frustrated in the elementary. Most sites are for students ages 13 and up. I won't allow them to create their own prezi, animoto, powtoon, etc. accounts. So I have them use my login & password which is likely breaking copyright rules. These social media platforms (including Pinterest), need to create student friendly ones for ages 7 and up (just threw out an age) so that we can integrate similar style of teaching.
  • Students can extend their learning into questions to parents, email conversations, Facebook posts or even twitter hashtags.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Organizations/schools have always tried to increase communication. Parents have always continued to want more understanding of what students are learning. Using this type of format and inviting them into the learning is crucial. They can give feedback, see how to help, and also feel confident in what students are learning and the type of projects/products. The trick- how do we integrate families without internet? That is not impossible (especially if they come pick at school and allowing access in the library), but something to seriously think about. Rural areas can't go to McDonalds 20 miles away to do homework. We must have a policy to help those without internet.
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  • supporting students in developing their skills and motivations for becoming themselves networked and sophisticated online learners
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I was elated to read this quote. I think we can focus too much on the what verses how do we grow and improve our resources. The sheer number of resources is overwhelming and can cause people to shut down. I think the key is to teach how to evaluate a resource and think about if it fits the current need. Curating is not like liking or making comments everywhere. We need to teach people how to decide.
Heather Whitman

Physical Environment Considerations, con't - 2 views

    • Heather Whitman
       
      I am curious what this would look like. I understand better how to increase the social side of online learning through video conferencing, forums, group projects, etc., but I wonder what this looks like for working in person while on the job. Working with other online looks can be very different than face to face on a regular basis.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      All too often we push, push kids from one area to another. No, we can't talk about this because we now have to move to science, or it is time for music. I think one of the biggest issues is we don't give enough time to process and reflect what we have learned and what question we have. I think designed correctly, this time to "chill out" is there naturally.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This is the area that I think begins the difficult part for many teachers. How do we allow kids freedom on a regular basis? What is suggested for practicing the routines/procedures/expectations for this? I think evaluating reports would be essential beyond the obvious to collect data but also to focus on time on task. I know some people are better being told what to do and when. I think this needs to be flexible.
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    • Heather Whitman
       
      How administrator and college prep programs would have to be adjusted/evaluated. Many of the descriptors still apply, but what the evidence looks like is different. This would take training so that administration feels confident.
Heather Whitman

What Do We Really Mean When We Say 'Personalized Learning'? | KQED - 1 views

  • “It meets the needs of an individual in a very standardized way, but it doesn’t take into account who that kid is.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I truly think the majority of teachers over many, many years have believed this statement and want to offer more choice. I think technology has increased the ability to meet these goals. How about kids who don't read near grade level or with mental health issues? What does this look like in the elementary? I believe in this statement and 100% in the philosophy of it but wonder how it can be done at a large level.
  • control and compliance
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think these are the heaviest words in the entire article. Schools need some kind of curriculum which by nature pushes more control and compliance. I think we need to really think this through. Assessment gets even tougher. How do you create a truly good rubric that doesn't "push" our agenda and control/compliance but allow students to meet our goals with freedom?
  • system of accountability
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think accountability can be looked at as a dirty word, but it definitely is necessary. Results must be evaluated for improvement, refinement, and celebration, just as we do for our students. Often, we have fidelity checks by various people across the district, principals do walk throughs, we have TCLS in Iowa with walk throughs and diccussions with different people. What would this look like in an online world and how would people look at 30 different students work? When it comes to accountability, people are going to need to start looking more at the product and process and not be able to collect data as much on the fly as we can with more traditional face to face. How exciting...could we create some how to for administrators to help guide this?
Heather Whitman

Article(s): Self- and Peer-Assessment Online - 1 views

  • take part ownership of this process.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      When I taught ELA in middle school, I would spend hours providing feedback. Most would throw it away and not even read it as there wasn't ownership on their end or they just did it for the grade. Google docs has allowed feedback to be more timely and allowed personal ownership as well as feedback from other staff and students. The power is the ownership for the student.
  • hopelessly naïve to imagine them being able to look at anything beyond the desired grade
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This bothers me a lot. If we have bare minimum expectations and hopes, then we do we get what we deserve? I understand there are students out there doing just that; however, perhaps those same students need the chance to reflect to see that it is not just about their grade. If students do this more and more often in K-12 world, wouldn't it start to become a part of the college world expectation? Perhaps all education levels need to get together to evaluate how to best attack this systemically!
Heather Whitman

ollie-afe-2018: Article: Attributes from Effective Formative Assessment (CCSSO) - 4 views

  • students’ ability to reason in increasingly complex ways
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This jumps out at me. The purpose of scaffolding and modeling along with high rigor for all allow students to reasons increasingly concept text. Let us not forget that teaching is incredibly difficult, and it truly is this that makes it challenging to do it well. But when done well, the results are amazing.
  • formative assessment process involve both teachers and students
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Often, teachers use informal data to drive instruction or make quick decisions. I think in the last 10 years there has been much more focus on metacognition. Teachers should and will formulate ideas informally. I think the key is goal setting and kids truly identifying where he/she is and communicate it in some way.
  • Remember the success criterion.
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  • two stars and a wish
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I like this terminology. Through the years, we would read others writings and give feedback or other activities. I would say give at least 2 positives and one idea for improvement. I think this terminology is excellent! This definitely takes a lot of modeling as this is difficult for many. Modeling with the rubric is a way to explain how to use a rubric. This must be practiced often.
  • involving students in decisions about how to move learning forward are illustrations of students and teachers working together in the teaching and learning process.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This truly only works in a growth mindset classroom vs. a fixed mindset. For the students or teachers who do things just to get done or just to get the "A", this is tough and often time rushed through. It think it takes a lot of discussions about why we learn. The focus on the learning process and not the final "grade" has to be key. This is much, much harder than it sounds. It goes full circle on how to create the formative and summative assessments. Are we focusing on just the final product or the process? This is hard.
Heather Whitman

ollie-afe-2018: Building a Better Mousetrap - 3 views

  • stultifying and others see as empowering.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      First of all, I had not seen the word stultifying before! In order for a rubric or other type of assessments to be empowering, students must understand how to use them and have examples that help guide the conversation. Students need to know the expectations and what is considered and exceeds and just beginning. We must put more ownership on the kids' ends to self-assess well before the final due date. We want kids to improve it. I have come to love checklists to help guide this.
  • post-secondary educators in all disciplines
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I have had quite a bit of training on assessment and rubrics and still feel it is almost impossible to write a good one. Are our post-secondary educators, many of whom don't necessarily have a teaching background, feel comfortable developing rubrics? Who is in charge of this huge task that can be career ending or career beginning for some?
  • current goals of solving real problems and using statistical reasoning.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This perplexes me...As Mike pointed out the need to focus more on the process, do we focus too much on the final product? Can't we have separate rubrics that assess along the way to help with this? It would improve learning but and help teachers truly give a grade with multiple indicators that assess work ethic, collaboration, final product, and the process. I am glad to hear that our focus isn't always on the right answer but creating students who can reason and problem solve.
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  • The issue of weighting may be another area in which you can enlist the help of students
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This perplexes me...As Mike pointed out the need to focus more on the process, do we focus too much on the final product? Can't we have separate rubrics that assess along the way to help with this? It would improve learning but and help teachers truly give a grade with multiple indicators that assess work ethic, collaboration, final product, and the process. I am glad to hear that our focus isn't always on the right answer but creating students who can reason and problem solve.
Heather Whitman

ollie-afe-2018: Educational Leadership: The Quest for Quality--article - 14 views

  • Most assumed that a low score or grade was probably justly assigned and that a decision made about a student as a result was as defensible as the evidence on which it was based
    • Heather Whitman
       
      moodle_iowa
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I have heard adults remember the testing as a child and parents say, "My child just isn't a good tester." I don't test very well. I avoided getting a masters from some schools because they required the GRE to get into the program. NO WAY! I often wonder why a GRE score determines who can take the courses and pay anyway? How should our colleges/universities look at the biases of testing and/or knowing some people haven't taken certain courses in 20 years?
  • multiple measures
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think the multiple measures really help us see the whole kid. What if I am artistic in nature and don't show what I know on the basic tests? What if I am ultra creative in writing? What if my strength is technology, and I disengage because all I want to do is create. Multiple measures is imperative, and we need to look at different ways as well.
  • t also helps them assign the appropriate balance of points in relation to the importance of each target as well as the number of items for each assessed target.
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  • wealth of data
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think the key here is to use the Understanding by Design format. This helps people to focus on what truly needs learned. It is easy to lose track of the goals and the results are distorted or biased.
  • cultural insensitivity
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think this is often overlooked. It is not intended and most are unaware. As our schools become more diversified, I think this is a huge part we need to address. We have to learn more about our students' lives and cultures. Then evaluate language or cultural expectations. Some cultures don't want students to look at people in their eye when talking. How does this work when they present? Are we thinking through what their thoughts are when presenting?
Heather Whitman

Screencasting - Kathy Schrock's Guide to Everything - 1 views

  •  
    This is an excellent source on ways to integrate screencasting and how to assess it as well.
Heather Whitman

Top Five Ways to Use Screencasting in the Classroom - 4 views

  • 5.  Screencasting & Grading
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I love the idea of using a screencasting software for grading. These comments would be more authentic and likely much more likely to be listened to than read. The teacher could continue the feedback and discuss, question, and still ask for further reflection. This would be a great way to extend learning.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I love the idea of using a screencasting software for grading. These comments would be more authentic and likely much more likely to be listened to than read. The teacher could continue the feedback and discuss, question, and still ask for further reflection. This would be a great way to extend learning.
  • Screencasting in this fashion can be easily transferred to both hybrid (mixed setting with a combination of traditional classroom experience and online experience) and blended learning situations (traditional classes that meet daily but still require online aspects of content delivery and assignment submission).
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This point reinforces all we have learned about blended learning. This tool allows for brick and mortar schools to grow in their development of online learning.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This point reinforces all we have learned about blended learning. This tool allows for brick and mortar schools to grow in their development of online learning.
  • 5.  Screencasting & Grading
Heather Whitman

ollie1 (Peterman): Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 21 views

  • Demonstrates competence in planning, designing, and incorporating instructional strategies
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I strongly believe this is the most essential part. It is the understanding of the big picture (Understanding by Design concepts from the late 90's), assessment, and how are we going to get there is the key to any teaching. This front loading, upfront planning, and focus on the big picture will ensure more learning. It is planned and not rushed. You will always need to adjust, and the moodle allows ample ways to adjust instruction as the students need it. Technology or no technology, this is the heart of teaching.
  • Provides opportunities that enable student self-assessment and pre-assessment within courses (SREB K, Varvel VI.I, ITS 5.d
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I really struggled which to pick out as being most essential in the 2nd area and I went between self assessment and the ability to differentiate with all learners. I decided to go with the self-assessment and pre-assessment. Hattie studied thousands and thousands of strategies and found the number one way to improve learning is through reflection- knowing where I am, setting goals, and reflecting along the way. This is the nice part with online learning as it forces all students to be transparent and not blend in with the class and not engage. With solid planning for a variety of abilities in the classroom, good assessment & feedback, and constant reflection, we should see improvement in learning.
Heather Whitman

ollie4_1: Article: Attributes from Effective Formative Assessment (CCSSO) - 1 views

  • Descriptive feedback should be about the particular qualities of student learning with discussion or suggestions about what the student can do to improve. It should avoid comparisons with other pupils
    • Heather Whitman
       
      This is a big statement. It requires a solid rubric, checklist, or whatever the assessment may be in order to have students see exactly what they did and keep us from comparing it to other students.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I did this in the writing process. It was difficult for students but powerful. I know now that I needed to model what suggestions for improvements & positives looked like besides, "spell better" or "it was good."
  • there is clearly no one best way to carry out formative assessment.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      And this is what making teaching so difficult yet makes it so awesome at the same time.
Heather Whitman

ollie4_1: Building a Better Mousetrap - 0 views

    • Heather Whitman
       
      I kept this private: oops: I am always amazed how students self-assess themselves. I was a language arts teachers and did a lot of writing. When I ask students today or in the past, how they think they did, I was floored how some of the writings/projects I thought were great, assessed themselves negatively, and the ones I thought needed more work, gave/give themselves exceeds. It takes a lot of good modeling and scaffolding for students to fairly assess themselves. For the ones that big time missed the assignment goals and self-assess themselves well, it really goes back to the teacher going back and reteaching again to help improve learning.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Oops- I kept this private. How many teachers did I have that graded in red? I remember many especially in math and writing all over writing assignments. I used to think that the assignment was complete, it was time to move on, and I just had to accept what they said. Rubrics do give the student a voice when they self assess. I find it interesting it is rooted in the word red or reddish.
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