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Bev Berns

geddit - 1 views

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    Get instant feedback on student learning with Geddit!
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    Just started using this for formative assessment. I really like the check-in feature for kids who are afraid to ask questions!
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    I will have to check this one out! With so many assessment tool choices out there it can seem overwhelming. Find one you like and use it.
Marisa Dahl

Little Bird Tales - Home - 0 views

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    Early childhood storytelling resource, it is also an app. 
Sam Oppel

Kahoot! - Create new Kahoot! - 1 views

shared by Sam Oppel on 30 Sep 14 - No Cached
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    I look forward to using this resource to learn more about my presentation attendees in the future. 
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    I use Kahoot daily with my students. I have a student in each of my classes in charge of making these quizzes. All the students in the class email that person a question and four possible answers. We start many classes with this quiz as an anticipatory set. It is also great for formative assessment!
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    Hey Sam -- I think I'm going to be a kahooter as well. I've looked at it and have seen it referenced at several different events/districts. It seems to be an effective way to offer formative assessment in a FUN way.
Janet Boyd

Assessment - 3 views

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    Multiple assessment resources are available on this website.
Marcia Jensen

Will · The "Immeasurable" Part 2 - 1 views

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    I've been thinking about ways to represent the emphasis on the measurable that I wrote about a few weeks ago, and I've come up with this graph which, I think, comes close to capturing the problem right now.
Marcia Jensen

Will · Valuing the Immeasurable - 0 views

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    As Justin puts it in his post, the tension is clear: we optimize the measurable at the risk of neglecting the immeasurable. And make no mistake, there is a lot of money out there for those who can "optimize the measurable" if we don't change the assessment.
Marcia Jensen

Can School Performance Be Measured Fairly? - 0 views

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    I get the online version of the NYT. When I went there today, they had a forum on assessment that includes opinions from nine different people from different perspectives. I think it addresses our topic and want to share it:
Marcia Jensen

How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful? | Edutopia - 0 views

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    "How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful?"
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    When I think about my own definition of a "meaningful assessment," I think the test must meet certain requirements. The assessment must have value other than "because it's on the test." It has value to the individual student who is taking it. It must intend to impact the world beyond the student "self," whether it is on the school site, the outlying community, the state, country, world, etc. And finally, the assessment should incorporate skills that students need for their future. That is, the test must assess skills other than the mere content. It must also test how eloquent the students communicate their content
Marcia Jensen

ollie_4: Article: Attributes from Effective Formative Assessment (CCSSO) - 1 views

  • there are a number of formative assessment strategies that can be implemented during classroom instruction.
    • Susie Peterson
       
      I know that it is too late to change the word "assessment" with formative (and I don't know what I would put in its place), but assessment is so tied to grading in everyone's mind. Formative assessment is not a grade or a "final" of anything. FA strategies help us accumulate data to find where student learning is and how teaching should address the next step toward the learning goal. SP
    • Tina Wahlert
       
      Great point, Susie! Maybe we could start a movement against the word "assessment' after formative. :)
    • keyna day
       
      That is confusing - would formative "analysis" or "process" work? :)
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      As an "old dog" I try to model learning "new tricks" which includes new understandings. Process is more of a stretch to the teachers I work with than assessment--they are slow to recognize how important process is, and impatient with assessing it.
  • Students then need time to reflect on the feedback they have received to make changes or improvements. In addition, students can be encouraged to be self-reflective by thinking about their own work based on what they learned from giving feedback to others.
    • Susie Peterson
       
      Giving students time to reflect and engage in the metacognition act is so important. Too many times, instructors rush from one assessment to the next instead of letting students build a piece and reconstruct it over and over, based on feedback and reflection -- deep learning can occur if we let it.
    • Tina Wahlert
       
      Thanks for the reminder. As you have taught me - reflection is important for students of any age!
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Teachers have to get over "covering" the material in order to allow themselves to give this reflection time. We need to learn this too.
  • Effective formative assessment involves collecting evidence about how student learning is progressing during the course of instruction so that necessary instructional adjustments can be made to close the gap between students’ current understanding and the desired goals.
    • Tina Wahlert
       
      I really like this definition of formative assessment - collecting evidence about student learning and then making adjustments to close the gap between current understanding and the desired goal. This is what I believe good teaching and learning is all about!
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I can already see that this article will be useful to me in working with our data teams this year.
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • Descriptive feedback should be about the particular qualities of student learning with discussion or suggestions about what the student can do to improve.
    • Tina Wahlert
       
      I agree with this statement. In my opinion, traditional grades do not provide the level of feedback a student needs to make improvements in their skills and knowledge. With descriptive feedback around the learning goals - the students understand where they are and what the target is.
  • Learning progressions describe how concepts and skills build in a domain, and show the trajectory of learning along which students are expected to progress. From a learning progression teachers have the big picture of what students need to learn, as well as sufficient detail for planning instruction to meet short-term goals. They are able to connect formative assessment opportunities to the short-term goals to keep track of how well their students’ learning is moving forward.
    • keyna day
       
      Our school is working on this and I believe we're doing an excellent job with posting/explaining our "learning targets" everyday. It is an excellent way to keep teachers and students focused on its learning goals. There is still more to apply and tweak but this is where I feel very confident about in my teaching.
  • This information should be communicated using language readily understood by students, and may be accompanied by realistic examples of those that meet and do not meet the criteria.
    • keyna day
       
      The criteria teachers must apply for formative assessment first needs to come from national/district standards, then broken down into unit goals, then down again into daily goals, then written so that students can understand them! Whew. That's why this is something to keep striving for!
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I believe this is a work in progress for most districts and teachers.
  • Helping students think meta-cognitively about their own learning fosters the idea that learning is their responsibility and that they can take an active role in planning, monitoring, and evaluating their own progress.
    • keyna day
       
      Some high school students can burned out if they are asked to constantly think about what they are learning. What has worked has been to check with them periodically or with a performance assessment to check how they are doing with their learning. Maybe if they were "trained" earlier, they would be more receptive more often.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      We were talking about the large number of high school students who need help in connection with RTI last week. The position of our curriculum person is that it will take awhile to have realistic numbers of students for level 3 interventions at the high school level. We are dealing with what we can, but need to wait for future students to get realistic numbers.
  • Formative assessment is not an adjunct to teaching but, rather, integrated into instruction
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      The hard part is the integration. Maybe it is hard because teachers still are deciding whether or not they value this.
  • involve both teachers and student
  • share learning goals with students and provide opportunities for students to monitor their ongoing progress.
  • teachers must provide the criteria by which learning will be assessed so that students will know whether they are successfully progressing toward the goal
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      "How will I know that I know?"
  • In self-assessment, students reflect on and monitor their learning using clearly explicated criteria for success. In peer-assessment, students analyze each others’ work using guidelines or rubrics and provide descriptive feedback that supports continued improvement.
  • partners in learning
  • for students to be actively and successfully involved in their own learning, they must feel that they are bona fide partners in the learning process.
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    Five Attributes of Formative Assessment
Marcia Jensen

Smarter Balanced Assessments | Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium - 1 views

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    The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium is developing a system of valid, reliable, and fair next-generation assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English language arts/literacy (ELA/literacy) and mathematics for grades 3-8 and 11. The system-which includes both summative and interim assessments for accountability purposes and optional interim assessments for instructional use-will use computer adaptive testing technologies to the greatest extent possible to provide meaningful feedback and actionable data that teachers and other educators can use to help students succeed.
lisa rasmussen

ollie4: Educational Leadership: The Quest for Quality - 5 views

  • Five keys to assessment quality provide the larger picture
    • Maryann Angeroth
       
      The Clear Purpose paragraph resonated with me since I just finished reading an article in Education Leadership called Know Your Target. It is all about knowing the purpose and sharing that with students and how student achievement goes up as a result.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I would agree with you that it is important to give the students a clear idea of the purpose of the lesson and how it would impact their life or daily skills.
  • Five keys to assessment quality provide the larger picture into which our multiple measures must fit
  • Are results communicated in time to inform the intended decisions
    • Maryann Angeroth
       
      One of the "What Works in the Classroom" strategies from Marzano is: Setting objectives and providing feedback. Research shows that giving feedback improves student achievement. This statement about results being communicated in time to inform the intended decisions reminds me of the Marzano work.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I have seen positive results in my own classroom when I have provided feedback in a timely manner that is directly to the specifics that were taught.
    • Judy Griffin
       
      This is one of the benefits of educational games if they are created well... instant feedback and another level to conquer!
    • Maryann Angeroth
       
      Did you read Evan's blog about gaming? I was interested in his perspective to making it synonomus with using literature to teach content.
    • Kevin McColley
       
      I completely agree! I have around 600 kids and try my best to comment more than just "good job" but with meaty feedback for my older kids in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade and I've seen many kids work and rework their challenges out until they get it. It shows the kids they're not just a number. :)
    • Mark McGaffin
       
      Teachers are becoming more data driven than ever before.  Teachers will need to have a condensed curriculum if they want to provide enrichment opportunities in their classroom.  Currently, there is not enough time within the school year for teachers to assess, analyze, and enrich for each and every child unless some of the content they are expected to teach is removed.  This is a situation where it looks great on paper but right now doesn't work in the classroom.  If we really are stressing Quality than quantity needs to be reduced. 
    • Tim Brickley
       
      The time factor and choosing the right assessments is a daily struggle for teaching. I wish that there was more time in the day, week, month to evaluate past assessments and determine the effectiveness of them.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      I agree with all your comments on the value of feedback. That's what I really like about some of the online assessments I've seen - kids get the feedback right away and then are pointed to extra help or a different type of explanation if they need it.
  • ...42 more annotations...
  • Who will use the results to inform what decisions?
    • Barb Shutt
       
      and...is there already and assessment in place that give you this information? Do I need to duplicate? Not only is the why important, but also the what-does it get to what I need to know for future instruction?
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      Your last statement is very importatn, Barb! That question should be asked prior to giving each assessment--how will this help my students and how will this help me to change my instruction to help my students.
  • four categories of learning targets
    • Barb Shutt
       
      I hadn't seen LT' broken down this way before.
    • Judy Griffin
       
      Neither have I seen this breakdown! Worth sharing with teachers.
    • linda vann
       
      I love this! What an easy, direct guide to clarifying learning targets!
    • David Olson
       
      Stiggins actually has 5 targets, which includes dispositional targets
  • which assessment methods are most likely to produce accurate results for different learning targets.
    • Barb Shutt
       
      It's always about working smarter, not harder and this leads us toward that.
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      I agree--and I really like this chart! It really helped to enhance my understanding of this information.
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      The chart is very helpful. I like how it shows that perfomance assessments aren't always the best, it depends on what you are assessing. I am glad selected response is still acceptable for knowledge mastery.
    • Gary Petersen
       
      I am always looking for "filters" that I can use when developing a course. This is a great filter when reviewing the assessments used in the course.
  • more assessments
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      If the additional assessments were mostly formative, I do believe that we would be more accurately estimating student achievement.
    • Becky Hinze
       
      And...if those formative assessments are linked directly to the learning of the skill, it wouldn't take time away from the learning to assess.
    • Mark McGaffin
       
      Currently I think the students feel like they are being assessed all day long.  Think about how many classes they have in a day.  If those teachers are being asked to provide data showing progress/mastery in each of their subject areas they will be overwhelmed with assessments.  A balance is key but at the same time we need to think about our students and think about what it might be like to be assessed this much.
    • linda vann
       
      Balance being the operative word here...assessment for assessment sake is not time efficient or effective. Assessment for adjusting instruction is highly valuable.
    • Natalie Smithhart
       
      I think more assessments can help teachers estimcate student achievement, but only if it is not taking away teaching time. We need to assess in ways that don't interupt class time. I know there are times that I have had to spend assessing my students when I felt I could of been giving them more by teaching....
  • The assessor needs to have a clear picture of what achievement he or she intends to measure. If we don't begin with clear statements of the intended learning—clear and understandable to everyone, including students—we won't end up with sound assessments.
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      Clear learning targets are so important--and so often not understood by teachers. I still work with so many teachers who don't question learning targets, as they just go from page to page in the textbook and teach what is next regardless if students already know the information or would need background knowledge in order to understand the concepts.
    • Becky Hinze
       
      So often we assess and we truly don't know what our learning targets were. Often our assessment doesn't even match what we thought our learning targets were.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I would agree that many of us do not take the time or effort to evaluate if the assessments actually measure what we are teaching in the classroom.
    • linda vann
       
      The alignment between curriculum, instruction, and assessment is critical. If we don't take the time to clarify our intended outcomes, how can we expect students to perform to expectations?
  • Or, you can highlight the phrases on the rubric that describe the hypothesis's strengths and areas for improvement and return the rubric with the work.
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      In the first class I took towards my Master's in Educational Technology, the professor did this--not just for our assignments, but also for our participation in our forums. Since then, I have "borrowed" this strategy for my own students. It definitely encouraged me to work on improving my responses in the weekly forums!
    • Mark McGaffin
       
      Might we be suggesting the end of grades and the beginning of standards based assessment?  How would that affect colleges and universities?  Would they be willing to accept a student who met all the standards at a school over a student who got a 4.0?
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      I think it depends on the discipline. Art and graphic design--and perhaps music--are probably going to be much farther ahead here. Students have to prepare portfolios of their work and that is what is looked at, at least at Morningside College. They also look at GPA, but there is more weight put on the portfolio.
    • Tim Brickley
       
      More and more former students are telling me they needed to submit a portfolio of past work for colleges. Whether it be for scholaraships or acceptance into a certain program.
  • assessment literate
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      I'm finding the sessions I've attended in Des Moines by Margaret Heritage to be very helpful in understanding what "assessment literate" means!
    • Pam Buysman
       
      That is a term I've not heard before. It makes sense, however. Data used inappropriately can have disastrous results.
    • Mark McGaffin
       
      The state will need to spend a lot of money and time training teachers how to assess, use the data, and enrich students.  As my district begins its transition into this new data-driven age, I am noticing more and more teachers struggling to analyze data.  They are also struggling to find enough time to check assessments, analyze data, and provide meaningful enrichment activities to help students reach proficiency. 
    • David Olson
       
      Stiggins has a great plan to move a district and a school toward assessment literacy. He calls it the 7 actions for school leaders.
  • four assessment methods (selected-response, extended written response, performance assessment, and personal communication
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      I'm not sure I've seen these four assessment methods listed like this. This is good information to have and to help in creating assessments.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      I have used all of these methods in my art class room, but not on a regular basis. Our 4th grade assessment assignment includes two methods. Students answer a written test with true/false and multiple choice answers to identify concepts the children know. Students make a drawing of a landscape and then go pack to paint the landscape. Teachers keep wanting to add the personal communication componant where the students discuss the choices they made in their landscape painting.
  • Do the results provide clear direction for what to do next?
  • Selecting an assessment method that is incapable of reflecting the intended learning will compromise the accuracy of the results.
    • Pam Buysman
       
      Selecting the best assessment method makes a difference. If we are using the data to guide our instruction, it's imperative we use the right assessment tool.
    • Judy Griffin
       
      I agree, Pam! So is ITBS or ITED ever the "right assessment tool"? Can they truly reflect the intended learning?
    • Nathan Fredericks
       
      We are told at my school that, at minimum, they are going to be better than what they were as the ITEDs are now supposed to be aligned with the Common/Iowa Core. We shall see how this will end up.
    • David Olson
       
      We are so messed up on our standardized tests when it comes to 21st century skills and their measurement.
    • Gary Petersen
       
      So much seems to be a matter of alignment. A misalignment between assessment method and intended learning leads to inaccuracy of results.
  • What decisions will the assessment inform?
    • Pam Buysman
       
      The following paragraph highlights the way formative assessments should guide our instruction. Changes may not be immediate, but they certainly provide a way to plan for the future.
  • Use SAT scores to determine instructional effectiveness
    • Pam Buysman
       
      Just a sidebar....could this mean we need to be very careful when we use ITBS scores to measure teacher effectiveness?
    • Judy Griffin
       
      Oh, yeah!!
    • Mark McGaffin
       
      Why doesn't NCLB consider the many other "X" factors that could influence ITBS scores when they make the SINA list or use data like this to determine teacher pay?  Great on paper but not in practice.
  • For instance, if students will be the users of the results because the assessment is formative, then teachers must provide the results in a way that helps students move forward. Specific, descriptive feedback linked to the targets of instruction and arising from the assessment items or rubrics communicates to students in ways that enable them to immediately take action, thereby promoting further learning.
    • Amy Burns
       
      I am going to play devil's advocate here.....how can we motivate students to take action in order to promote learning if that is not within their goals? I agree that descriptive feedback linked to targets will give more meaning to the assessment, but in all reality, don't we often deal with students who can't see the reason for the writing?
    • Maryann Angeroth
       
      Why do you think that is? How many K-2 students are not excited about coming to school and learning? What happens that kills thier love and devotion to learning?
    • linda vann
       
      Do you see this attitude of "this doesn't fit my goals/needs" as more prevalent at the secondary level or the elementary level? I know I have seen this with adult learners until they understand they tune to WII-FM (What In It For Me?). Once they do, then the learning "takes off" like gangbusters when provided the specific type of feedback described here.
  • Teachers should design the assessment so students can use the results to self-assess and set goals. A mechanism should be in place for students to track their own progress on learning targets and communicate their status to others.
    • Amy Burns
       
      Self-assessment is a vital step in setting personal goals. How many of our students have actually been asked to look deeply into their skill set? Would many students willingly "communicate their status to others?" Hmmmmm
    • Judy Griffin
       
      I think this is a great reason why students should have input into what is being assessed in a rubric... what is important and how will you know what you know?
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Well-designed rubrics not only set targets but also help students monitor their progress. It has been my experience that middle school students are quite honest and perceptive in self-evaluations when "communicate their status to others" means sharing the self-assessment exclusively with me (their instructor) or with me and their parents or guardians.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      Students would need to be guided through self-assessment at first.
  • data from these assessments
    • Judy Griffin
       
      It's all about data!! "What does the data say...?"
    • linda vann
       
      The caution about data is using it appropriately. It is an intensely powerful tool if used to make decisions about instruction and assessment. The more data, the better!
    • Cheryl Carruthers
       
      The more data, the better....this makes sense to me. We need to make sure we are using the right data in making decisions; making decisions based upon poor or incomplete data leads to poor decisions. Here lies another challenge...it sometimes seems like we are "drowning in data." How do we choose the data we use?
    • Natalie Smithhart
       
      It seems obvious...the data you get from assessing should show you what your students are learning and what you need to work on more. I like your comment Cheryl...it does seem like sometimes I have more data than I know how to organize or what to do with it!
  • Assess learning targets requiring the "doing" of science with a multiple-choice tes
    • Judy Griffin
       
      I've seen this many times - the assessment doesn't fit the learning expectations.
  • meeting student, teacher, and district information needs
  • a reading score from a state accountability test as a diagnostic instrument for reading group placement.
    • linda vann
       
      Or expect that decisions regarding eligibility for special education is based on diagnostic assessments alone!
  • Using misinformation
  • his means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      Parent involvement is an important component when children are young. Parents help a child budget time. If they are not aware of what the child is involved in, or needs to set aside time for, then the child will not accomplish much. parents also need to be able to understand the terms involved and the intended outcome.
  • all assessment users have access to the data
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      Our art department currently grades all children, but only assesses 4th grade students with a February drawing, painting, and multiple choice test. Children and Parents should have an idea before then about how their child is picking up one the curriculum.
  • From that foundation
  • groups of students
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      Our distirct is really focused on SES and IEP students since that is where our lowest ITED scores are.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      We would have to add African-American in our district in addition to SES and IEP.
  • unprecedented overflow of testing
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      Our department had to create a math assessment that would test what the average 10th grader should know. Then we were told the test should be about what all 10th graders should know. We have spent countless hours debating, rewriting and trying to come up with methods on how to help our students that are not proficient on the test.
    • Cheryl Carruthers
       
      Today on the radio, I hear Jason Glass say that all 11th graders need to take the ACT and the state needs to help pay for this. I don't think I agree with adding another required assessment for our students...I do agree we need to provide a rigorous curriculum for our secondary students, but do they need to demonstrate their knowledge by taking the ACT??
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      In response to Deena, I have struggled as the leader of the curriculum and assesment efforts on WHAT to ask people to do. I have hesitated developing any local assessments due to the movement from local standards...to Iowa Core and not the common core. Hope we have stopped changing because up to now it has been a moving target!
  • In math
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      This is the first time I have actually seen a math example when discussing assessment. Usually the examples I see are for english or social studies.
    • Jean Van Gilder
       
      knowledge targets work pretty well in mathematics!
  • A grade of D+, on the other hand, may be sufficient to inform a decision about a student's athletic eligibility, but it is not capable of informing the student about the next steps in learning.
    • Cheryl Carruthers
       
      Thus the term "assessment FOR learning." The intent is to provide guidance for improvement.
    • Gary Petersen
       
      It's amazing the number of assessments that I have received in my formal learning that involved only a grade or pass/fail. It makes me wonder if I retained very much from those learning opportunities.
  • Teachers have choices in the assessment methods they use, including selected-response formats, extended written response, performance assessment, and personal communication.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Wouldn't matching method of assessment to method of practice be a consideration?
  • which require students to use their knowledge to reason and problem solve
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      This is an area that I am currently working on. I am trying to come up with more projects so that students can apply what they are learning.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      When I took my first college stat class, I could follow the directions just fine and get the right answer, but I had no idea why we were using the particular statistic or what it actually meant. When I asked my stat lab instructor, he looked up my grade and said, "What do you care, you're getting an A." I cared because I wanted to know how to use the stuff, not just get through the class!
  • What information do the decision makers need
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      This paragraph makes a distinction between decision makers that we might forget when edited our assessments. There is a definite difference in level and approach between classroom and school or community assessments.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      Agreed. I think not recognizing that distinction can lead to misuse of the data. For example, a school or community use of classroom level data when they don't know the circumstances or environment under which the data is collected can lead to some inappropriate conclusions.
  • use of clear curriculum maps for each standard
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      Although time consuming, the importance of curriculum maps becomes clear when writing essential questions and revisiting the teaching strategies we use to improve student learning.
  • instructional hours sacrificed to testing will return dividends in the form of better instructional decisions and improved high-stakes test scores.
    • Jessica White
       
      This is our hope as educators. I truly hope that the valuable time spent testing will return dividends.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      I find the information gathered to be very useful to my teaching, and to the students and parents.
  • Ongoing classroom assessments serve both formative and summative purposes and meet students' as well as teachers' information needs.
  • provide information about student progress not typically available from student information systems
    • Jean Van Gilder
       
      Time involved is major...classroom teachers will tell you it is very labor intensive.
  • high-stakes tests were common in schools
    • Bruce Baedke
       
      Seems like the public would say this isn't true. They would believe that there was no accountability before NCLB.
  • if the teacher wants to assess knowledge mastery of a certain item, both selected-response and extended written response methods are good matches
    • Bruce Baedke
       
      At muy school our science assessment is of this variety with both extended response and multiple choice answers for teh questions asked.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      I agree that a variety should be used in accurate assessment. Students respond differently to different assesment methods. Some students have a very anxious response to timed tests, or written tests, but may do fine in showing their knowledge on multiple choice or matching.
  • Students learn best when they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      Best parent teacher conference I ever attended was a student-led one for my 5th grader. Each student built their portfolio and was in charge of explaning it to their parents. Most honesty and responsibility I've ever seen in kids!
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      I have been to the same kind of Open House led by students in the class. It really gives the students ownership to what happens in that classroom.
  • to triangulate on student needs defeats the purpose of bringing in more results to inform our decisions.
    • Gary Petersen
       
      Multiple measures have been used for years to establish whether assessments are valid. Very important to note that if the measures are not valid, multiple measures do not indicate validity.
  • For example, suppose we are preparing to teach 7th graders how to make inferences. After defining inference as "a conclusion drawn from the information available," we might put the learning target in student-friendly language: "I can make good inferences. This means I can use information from what I read to draw a reasonable conclusion." If we were working with 2nd graders, the student-friendly language might look like this: "I can make good inferences. This means I can make a guess that is based on clues."
  • Bias can also creep into assessments and erode accurate results. Examples of bias include poorly printed test forms, noise distractions, vague directions, and cultural insensitivity.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      I believe we are OK at reviewing materials with a "traditional" sense of bias but when it comes to cultural sensitivity...I'm not sure my district has a handle on the work.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      I agree. Some cultural sensitivity can't be easily understood by other people. I've been surprised often by what kids say about the way their family opperates.
  • What are the essential assessment conditions?
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      When we do our annual assessment for 4th grade artists effort is made to provide clear instructions and visuals, with the same materials available to all teachers. The other factors that enter into a student's performance vary widely. Some teachers deliver the test in their own art room, others in the classroom because they teach there. There are many factors that affect performance.
  • No Child Left Behind
  • The assessor must plan to manage information from the assessment appropriately and report it in ways that will meet the needs of the intended users,
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      i would assume this would mean that information should be shared in user-friendly language for parents and students, and be shared in a timely fashion.
  •  
    Different assessment methods chart
Deb Henkes

Infographics as a Creative Assessment - 0 views

  • This site will provide you with links, ideas, tips, and much more for supporting the use of infographics as an assessment option in the classroom. The site has three informational pages, linked on the right.
  •  
    Infographics as a Creative Assessment. This  Kathy Schrock site provides links, ideas, tips, and much more for supporting the use of infographics as an assessment option in the classroom. Great way to differentiate your classroom and provide support for visual leaners.
parsonsbrandi

Educational Leadership:Multiple Measures:The Quest for Quality - 9 views

  • In the past, few educators, policymakers, or parents would have considered questioning the accuracy of these tests.
    • Denise Krefting
       
      I was a teacher who didn't question cut scores. In fact they made life easier for me- but there really was no real learning beyond the assessment. This transition to continual learning makes so much more sense!
    • denise carlson
       
      This sentence is so true. I remember bringing home ITBS scores to my parents. As long as the scores were in the 90th percentile or better they were pleased. I don't remember them ever digging deeper to ask the teacher what I actually knew or did not know. To them it was an important test and whatever the results said must have been the truth. I'm glad we're not there anymore.
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      Very true. We never questioned ITBS or ITED scores - we believed they were the one and only true assessment of a student's abilities. My how things are changing! There are so many factors to consider (region, vocabulary, did the student eat breakfast, did the student get enough rest, etc).
    • Natalie Smithhart
       
      I can remember as a child being very worried about my ITBS score, I was never a good test taker and I knew how "important" these tests were. I am glad that these days we use more authentic types of assessments also.
    • Lora Lehmkuhl
       
      I just reviewed ITED scores with our son. I recently read that ITED scores are closely related to scores one might expect for ACTs. This really worries me as a parent since we have a special needs child whose vision problems have greatly affected his performance in school. He plans to take the ACT test this spring and I know he's not prepared to accept a low score. Convincing him that he needs to take practice tests and study has been really difficult.
  • The assessor must begin with a clear picture of why he or she is conducting the assessment.
    • Denise Krefting
       
      Using this with the concept of backward design shows us how many options all fit together.
    • Joletta Yoder
       
      I too value the "Begin with the end in mind" method. I find it easier, after establishing learning goals, to determine how I'll assess them then let that direct my method of instruction.
    • Lora Lehmkuhl
       
      The "end product" might have different meaning to the student. For example, I teach a cooking class and the end product is often the food prepared. It can be difficult to convince the student that a standard muffin has specific characteristics. We review the characteristics before beginning the lab. In the eyes of the student, if it is edible it's just fine! You wouldn't believe how many times students have mixed up baking soda for baking powder and have been completely satisfied with a pancake that tastes like soap.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Strangely, after all the staff development, I think some teachers don't know why they are giving certain assessments. Part of this may be that they are philosophically opposed to so much testing but I think there is still a lack of understanding about the concepts being taught: the minutiae are more clear.
  • four categories of learning targets are
    • Julie Townsend
       
      These targets could define four different assessments given quarterly. Don't we give informal assessments that cover some of these targets?
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I like checklist type information because it helps me to evaluate and plan my own instruction. I can use these criteria to make sure I plan for all these targets in my instruction.
  • ...58 more annotations...
    • Denise Krefting
       
      What is the Iowa Core calling these?
  • Do the results provide clear direction for what to do next?
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      What plan is provided for improvement with the Iowa Assessments?
    • Darin Johnson
       
      I would like to see an efficient, real-world model of such a system.
    • Joletta Yoder
       
      I would love to see our inservices allow for time to have such reflections on our assessments and allow us to redirect our planning. How much more would we see student growth if we not only reflected and redirected but also shared our observations with colleagues who also have the students (cross-curricular and at the next level) to have growth be specific and continual rather than a 9 month experiment that restarts from Ground Zero the following year!
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      Yes! There's so much research that values reflection, and yet it's something that one almost feels "guilty" doing on contract time.
  • Selecting an assessment method that is incapable of reflecting the intended learning will compromise the accuracy of the results.
    • Lori Pearson
       
      This shows how important it is to set your learning targets and then make sure your assessment gives you the information that you are seeking in regards to those targets.
    • jalfaro
       
      Without proper training, I'm sure this happens all too often. Teachers often teach and test based on their own experiences and not based on best-practices.
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      If you can't determine an assessment to match your learning target, could it be that your learning target needs revision?
    • Julie Townsend
       
      I couldn't agree with you more! Some teachers refuse to open up to the latest in best practice, assuming that '36' years of teaching for example, has given them enough info to have 'all' the answers. And if the assessment is too difficult to create to match the target, why yes, revise the target. It seems we need to think outside the box, and to remind ourselves to keep updated and in touch with the world.
    • Deb Versteeg
       
      I think many times, the catch here is the gradebook. Many stakeholders(parents, students, administrators, etc.) have very rigid expectations for grading and equate assessment and grading. Teachers don't know how to manage both effectively, and tend to default to the needs of the gradebook for survival.
    • Lori Pearson
       
      Ah.......the gradebook. I believe you have hit the nail on the head, Deb.
    • Denise Krefting
       
      I have found it useful for another person to look at the assessment. Especially someone in a different curriculum area.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      That sounds like a good idea. Why, specifically, do you use someone from a different curriculum area? I can think of some ideas, but I don't know if they are the ones you are considering.
  • After defining inference as "a conclusion drawn from the information available,"
    • Denise Krefting
       
      So.. if my rubric says " requires deep thought" and I define or give examples of deep thought would that be better. I am struggling with the use of those words in my rubric- my participants have had not difficulty with the words, I just feel it isn't as specific as maybe I should make it....
    • Julie Townsend
       
      What is the definition of 'deep'?
  • a student might assess how strong his or her thesis statement is by using phrases from a rubric,
    • Lori Pearson
       
      Connection to rubrics in my group during the first week-are the phrases strong and promote further progress in their learning?
    • Darin Johnson
       
      I like the phrase "using phrases from a rubric." I think I'll borrow this idea and phrasing!
  • If we don't begin with clear statements of the intended learning—clear and understandable to everyone, including students—we won't end up with sound assessments.
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      I remember once writing a test item that had a term in it that my sophomore biology students didn't understand. Some asked me what the word meant, but what about those who were too embarrassed to ask?
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      This helps solidify the Iowa Core characteristic of effective instruction--assessment for learning and why it is part of the Iowa Core.
    • parsonsbrandi
       
      I can relate this to my children and the way that my husband and I differ on how we give directions. For example, he may say, "Your job is to be good." To a three and a five year old, "be good" is a very vague term. I might say something along the lines of, "Your job is to listen without interupting me, use good manners like saying, 'please and thank you,' and to sit down while we're eating dinner."
  • Figure 2 (page 18) clarifies which assessment methods are most likely to produce accurate results for different learning targets.
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      I have seen this chart from Stiggins work before and have found it to be quite useful. This reminds me of why we need to take the written portion to get an Iowa Driver's license, as well as taking Driver's Ed. or taking the Driving portion (of the test) to get a Driver's License. We need to know both the factual "stuff" (like what a STOP sign means), as well as the skill of being able to actually drive a vehicle.
  • new levels of testing that include benchmark, interim, and common assessments.
    • jalfaro
       
      And I wonder how much Professional Development teachers (new and old) have been given to support them as they face the new assessment expectations. I think too much is taken for granted...teachers need training if all of this testing and data is to make a real difference for our students.
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      Totally agree!! Teachers need to know not only how and why they are collecting data.  But how to use the data to make instructional decisions.
  • the use of multiple measures does not, by itself, translate into high-quality evidence.
    • jalfaro
       
      Exactly! More is necessarily better.
  • and the students themselves
    • jalfaro
       
      I think that we often forget about this part of the equation! I remember all too often getting a computer generated page back with test results that I couldn't understand and I'm sure that this is still happening nationwide. We must not forget that our jargon must be translated to the student and the parent so that all stakeholders are on the same page.
  • test plan.
    • jalfaro
       
      And how often do we as teachers fly by the seat of our pants?
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      This takes me back to DWALA training from Heartland AEA years ago. Anyone else remember this?
    • Julie Townsend
       
      We do sometimes, especially when placed into a different level of programming at the end of the school year.
  • noise distractions
    • jalfaro
       
      I once had to ask that they stop mowing the grass just outside my classroom window while my students took the FCAT Reading test in Florida...minor details like this can make a HUGE difference for the kids testing! I couldn't believe that my administrators hadn't considered all of the details.
    • terri lamb
       
      This can be major for some students - I took a professional knnowledge test years ago in an auditorium and the monitors were talking softly at the front but it really carried - they had no idea and I didn't say anything but noise doesn't normally bother me so I know it bothered others.
  • assessment literate
    • jalfaro
       
      something else that I think is often taken for granted....
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      Agree. . .another reason for TA for teachers regarding how to not only gather data, but understand how to use it.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Here lies a bigger problem than we want to acknowledge.
  • Clear Learning Targets
    • Sandy Kluver
       
      When I first read Stiggins and Chappius' works, it was clear that targets need to be static... not moving! We can't expect students to hit a moving target.
    • Lori Pearson
       
      If you don't know where you're going, how can you get there?
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  • aim for the lowest possible reading leve
    • Sandy Kluver
       
      This really surprises me. I've never thought to write a test at the least possible reading level. With my ESL students, I always make sure the words aren't new to the students but hadn't thought about the level I was writing the test at.
  • Use a reading score from a state accountability test as a diagnostic instrument for reading group placement.
    • Sandy Kluver
       
      hmmm... we do this for Instructional Decision Making groups in Carroll. It's only one piece of the puzzle, but at the beginning of the year, we rely on the ITBS Reading Comp score to place students into groups.
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      Unfortunately, I think that is a common practice of many districts.
    • Deb Versteeg
       
      Sandy, I've always been bothered by this part of IDM, also.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I have done this myself at the high school level. No other data exists for my use in connection with students I don't know and time constraints.
  • Seven strategies of assessment for learning.
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      This is one of the most practical resources on assessment that I have read in a long time. I recommend it to all!
  • cultural insensitivity
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      I witnessed this first hand when the demographics in one district changed dramatically over the course of about two years. For younger students, pictures in an assessment were used. Several of the students had never seen a rose, but they knew it was a flower--but flower wasn't a choice.
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      This is so true! One night my husband and I were watching COPS and they were in NYC. A little boy pointed to the very small grassy area in between four apartment buildings that made a square and said, "He just ran through that meadow." I looked at my husband and said, "That kid would flunk the ITBS because he doesn't know the true definition of a meadow...for him, the small grassy area is a meadow. But for our region, a meadow is described totally differently and looks totally different." Test writers do not consider regional vocabulary enough when putting together an assessment. It is still 'one size fits all.'
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      There are some obvious things when it comes to cultural sensitivity. There are also some things a person preparing a test just might not know since their culture is different.
  • access to the data they want when they need it,
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      This implies timely feedback.
  • students
  • learning continuum
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      Learning progressions that Margaret Heritage talks about in Assessment for Learning.
  • The classroom is also a practical location to give students multiple opportunities to demonstrate what they know and can do
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      Multiple is the key word here!
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      I agree - multiple opportunities. We need to consider the various learning styles that we are teaching to each day and how each will best be able to show proficiency based on a product meaningful to the learner.
  • the reason for assessing is to document individual or group achievement or mastery of standards and measure achievement status at a point in time.
    • Julie Townsend
       
      Mastery is what we want as teachers, and using an accurate assessment done frequently should show us how far students have come in their achievement.
  • Choosing the Right Assessment
    • Julie Townsend
       
      I like this table--the categories and the description within.
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      Agree. Would be a good reference tool for all teachers.
    • Lisa Buss
       
      I think I will use this as a reference.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I agree as well. This would be a good tool to share with my home school parents.
    • Joletta Yoder
       
      Great reminder for all of us, especially English teachers, that we can, and should, be using various forms of assessment. I'm hitting PRINT right now and posting this on my wall in and in my planning folders!
  • Specific, descriptive feedback linked to the targets of instruction and arising from the assessment items or rubrics communicates to students in ways that enable them to immediately take action, thereby promoting further learning.
    • Darin Johnson
       
      Whenever I read the word "specific," I can't help but to remember my third year of teaching when the English 9 teachers would share an old reel-to-reel converted to VHS instructional video with the class. Several minutes into the video, the narrator would tell the students: "Specific is terrific." This type of feedback is really the exception rather than the rule, isn't it?
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      This is really good practice, but extremely time consuming. We need to include as much as possible, but it may not always be feasible or possible to do it all the time.
  • build balanced systems, with assessment-literate users
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      Wouldn't an RTI model with all its components (e.g., universal screening, progress monitoring, etc.) implemented with fidelity, meet this criteria??
  • Creating a plan like this for each assessment helps assessors sync what they taught with what they're assessing.
    • terri lamb
       
      .This is a great way to document each assessment.
  • In the case of summative tests, the reason for assessing is to document individual or group achievement or mastery of standards and measure achievement status at a point in time.
    • Darin Johnson
       
      The point where my assessment breaks down is that my formative assessments are almost always for individuals rather than for groups. Aside from ITEDs, no one beyond my classroom seems concerned with assessment data.
  • inform instructional improvement and identify struggling students and the areas in which they struggle
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      If we can identify students at-risk earlier through regular progress monitoring, we can move away from the "waiting to fail" model. 
  • Students learn best when they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning.
    • terri lamb
       
      When we begin a project in desktop publishing the students and I brainstorm the different skills and techniques they can demonstrate and use in the project which in turn becomes their checklist or rubric. They feel more ownership and may need to revisit a skills that other students - they often require more of themselves as well.
    • Lisa Buss
       
      I think this is very true and I also believe that the learning is at a higher level.
  • For each assessment, regardless of purpose, the assessor should organize the learning targets represented in the assessment into a written test plan that matches the learning targets represented in the curriculum
    • Lisa Buss
       
      In other words, we must test over wht we've taught?
    • Deb Versteeg
       
      Or....we need to be sure that students are learning what is going to be assessed. And what is going to be assessed is aligned with the intended learning target. I think too often in classrooms, the teaching is first, then the learning, then the alignment with the assessments or definied learning targets.
    • Natalie Smithhart
       
      So we need to decide what is going to be assessed first before we create the curriculum. I think often as teachers we do this the other way around. Seems like it should be simple, but sometimes I find myself creating my curriculum before I have decided what I might need to assess.
  • Teachers should design the assessment so students can use the results to self-assess and set goals.
    • Lisa Buss
       
      I need to do a better job of this!
  • Annual state and local district standardized tests serve annual accountability purposes, provide comparable data, and serve functions related to student placement and selection, guidance, progress monitoring, and program evaluation.
    • Lisa Buss
       
      But, in my opinion, what's being taught isn't necessarily what's being evaluated.
  • As a "big picture" beginning point in planning for the use of multiple measures, assessors need to consider each assessment level in light of four key questions, along with their formative and summative applications1
    • Lisa Buss
       
      This is brand new to me!
  • Summative applications refer to grades students receive (classroom level)
    • Lisa Buss
       
      I wish we could get away from grades and move to a benchmark checklist. When the student is proficient in one skill or concept they can move on to the next.
  • At the level of annual state/district standardized assessments, they involve where and how teachers can improve instruction—next year.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      It is great when this data is used to improve instruction. I was teaching in Texas whe Gov. Perry took over from George Bush (late 90s). The annual testing there was used to determined which schools received the most funds for the next year. High scoring schools received more money; low scoring schools received less money. Sadly, the low scoring schools generally needed the funds so much more than the high scoring schools. I had friends teaching in downtown Houston who told me how many of their students came to school with just a plain tortilla for lunch. They needed more funds, but since they received low scores received less funds. The students from the suburbs (such as Sugarland where at that time the mean income was $100,000/year, attending private tutoring (paid for by parents) several afternoons a week so their test scores would be higher. I literally saw students and teachers who had nervous breakdowns due to the pressure on the testing results. I agree we need assessments; I'm just concerned about how some of those assessments are used.
  • Feedback to students can use the language of the rubric:
  • Although it may seem as though having more assessments will mean we are more accurately estimating student achievement
    • Deb Versteeg
       
      This is definitely a common misconception.
    • Lori Pearson
       
      Although, there are times when we need to dig deeper to find out exactly what area needs strengthening. Take reading comprehension, for example, so they are low in that area, what does that mean-many, many components make up that area.
  • The assessor
    • Deb Versteeg
       
      This term, "the assessor", in and of itself has got me thinking. While the instructor might be the one "giving" the assessment, might the "assessor" at times not be the instructor? Could the state or the district be the assessor in some cases? Could the student be the assessor?
    • Amy Burns
       
      Devil's Advocate at work here....in a perfect world, our assessments would inspire students to WANT to improve, but in reality, can a rubric really do that in and of itself?
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I have yet to see a student use a rubric to improve a project. I think the idea of it is good, but the self-motivation is not there, or I don't know how to motivate them myself.
  • Given the rise in testing, especially in light of a heightened focus on using multiple measures, it's increasingly important to address two essential components of reliable assessments: quality and balance.
    • Amy Burns
       
      Agreed. Now, if multiple measures are indeed so important, why are we still so mired in the standardized tests to judge success?
    • Kay Durfey
       
      I believe that this article "The Quest for Quality" really gets at the heart of the importance of having "focus lessons" daily and more long-term learning targets for both teachers and students. Being specific and purposeful about what and how we want students to learn (skills and academic (vocabulary) is essential to genuine learning and performances.
  • Knowledge targets,
  • Reasoning targets
  • Performance skill targets
  • Product targets
  • It also helps them assign the appropriate balance of points in relation to the importance of each target as well as the number of items for each assessed target.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Is anyone besides me starting to feel overwhelmed? I guess this could be done as a districtwide assessment project, but what this article is really starting to accentuate is how little time teachers have for pondering once a school year begins.
  • This key ensures that the assessor has translated the learning targets into assessments that will yield accurate results. It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      This is what I really want to learn how to do!
  • A mechanism should be in place for students to track their own progress on learning targets and communicate their status to others
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      My comment here concerns this whole paragraph. I think we need to provide time to students as well as teachers for analyzing the results of assessments, and for using the results to make their projects better. As it is, no one has time to revisit the object of the assessment. Time constraints have all educational participants roaring along at breakneck speeds
  • Who is the decision maker?
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      I think this question is crucial. If the decision-maker and the purpose of the test are punitive rather than informed, no wonder people don't want to be assessed! of course we need to consider this as people who are decisionmakers and quit using tests scores to punish students--we don't like being punished for results and neither do they.
  • applying data to decisions for which they aren't suited.
  • Assessment literacy
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Surely a staff development need.
  • A detailed chart listing key issues and their formative and summative applications at each of the three assessment levels is available at www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el200911_chappius_table.pdf
    • Marcia Jensen
       
      Hoping to share this with our data teams this year.
  • cultural insensitivity
  • Are results communicated in time to inform the intended decisions?
  • to know what constitutes appropriate and inappropriate uses of assessment results—thereby reducing the risk of applying data to decisions for which they aren't suited.
  •  
    The point where my assessment breaks down is that my formative data is rarely shared with others. We don't look for trends or patterns or discuss needed changes in content or instructional delivery.
  •  
    I believe that this article "The Quest for Quality" really gets at the heart of the importance of having "focus lessons" daily and more long-term learning targets for both teachers and students. Being specific and purposeful about what and how we want students to learn (skills and academic (vocabulary) is essential to genuine learning and performances.
  •  
    Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner. Our 175,000 members in 119 countries are professional educators from all levels and subject areas--superintendents, supervisors, principals, teachers, professors of education, and school board members.
Amy Burns

Wiki Rubric - 0 views

  •  
    Great rubric. University of Wisconsin-Stout has a newsletter with many tips and suggestions regarding technology in education....worth signing up for.
Erica Larson

The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct and Use Them[1] - 1 views

  •  
    Joseph D. Novak & Alberto J. Cañas Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition Pensacola Fl, 32502 www.ihmc.us Technical Report IHMC CmapTools 2006-01 Rev 2008-01 (click here for a printable PDF version: small filesize (998K) or high quality 6.6MB)) Introduction Concept maps are graphical tools for organizing and representing knowledge. They include concepts, usually enclosed in circles or boxes of some type, and relationships between concepts indicated by a connecting line linking two concepts. Words on the line, referred to as linking words or linking phrases, specify the relationship between the two concepts. We define concept as a perceived regularity in events or objects, or records of events or objects, designated by a label. The label for most concepts is a word, although sometimes we use symbols such as + or %, and sometimes more than one word is used. Propositions are statements about some object or event in the universe, either naturally occurring or constructed. Propositions contain two or more concepts connected using linking words or phrases to form a meaningful statement. Sometimes these are called semantic units, or units of meaning. Figure 1 shows an example of a concept map that describes the structure of concept maps and illustrates the above characteristics.
ksteingr

Intel Education - For K12 Education - 0 views

  •  
    Great assessment tools - all free from Intel. Register for an account.
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