Skip to main content

Home/ OLLIE Iowa/ Group items tagged Ollie

Rss Feed Group items tagged

karolynzeller

ollie1 (Peterman): Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 8 views

  • • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students (SREB A.3, Varvel II.A, ITS 2.a)
    • joanmax
       
      Not all teachers know their course content well but are required to teach it anyway
    • lundgrensc
       
      I would also add that there are many that know their content but don't know how to effectively teach it.
  • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the course (Varvel VI.F)
    • joanmax
       
      Student feedback is not always reliable.
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face
    • reppdi
       
      I think it's very important to realize the difference.  I'm an intelligent person but get very lost in online courses.
    • karolynzeller
       
      I feel the same way. It made me wonder how often I'd have adult students new to online learning that would have a really steep learning curve just to navigate the course and would feel frustrated. 
  • Communicates assessment criteria and standards to students, including rubrics for student performances and participation
    • reppdi
       
      Important that students are able to easily access the information as well.
  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student (SREB F.1, Varvel II.E)
    • lundgrensc
       
      Experiencing as I go. 
    • annoleary
       
      Yes! I'll be teaching an online course soon, and have noticed MANY things that I have appreciated and want to be sure to provide for my students. Even though I have taken online classes before, it has been several years and I didn't focus as much on what the instructor does in order to support learning--and help keep frustration at bay!
  • • Tailors instruction to meet the different needs of students, including different learning styles
    • tjetman1
       
      And just how is this done?  One would guess through video, audio, reading?
    • dschaeferia
       
      I think one of the hurdles we need to jump is tailoring the needs of students. Finding the best fitting material for each learner can be a challenging.  How many different learning styles need to be address for each lesson?   Will address many learning styles per unit cause "too much information"?
    • annoleary
       
      People have different learning styles, and some do better online. For me, it depends on the course. I did my Masters Degree in Teaching Elementary Reading completely online and LOVED it. However, I am struggling with this course more than I expected. I have discovered that I learn better through reading and hacing written, step-by-step material to refer back to. Rewatching videos several times to complete a seemingly simple task is frustrating. I don't like printing when it's not necessary, but it helps me to print out the information. That realization is just one example of how we all learn in different ways, and teachers need to provide information through as many mediums as possible to help all students.
  • Demonstrates ethical conduct as defined by state law and local policies or procedures
    • tjetman1
       
      Is there a list of these?  So many things to think about.
  • Assists students with technology used in the course
    • tjetman1
       
      This seems like it would be a very important part of online learning. If the instructor is lacking in the ability or willingness to troubleshoot students tech issues, it could make for a very long class
    • dschaeferia
       
      There is no such thing as clear technical support!  I say that tongue in cheek from years of tech support experience.  The tech support needed for each participate varies, just as it does for their learning styles.  There a so many issues that could be the problem, I think if the support needs to be spread out.  This is also frustrating for students who are having problems and have to jump from tech to tech to get answers.  The instructor needs to have a team of help in their back pocket to quickly address student issues.  That may not always be available!
  • Assists students with technology used in the course (Varvel III.C)
    • dschaeferia
       
      There is no such thing as clear technical support!  I say that tongue in cheek from years of tech support experience.  The tech support needed for each participate varies, just as it does for their learning styles.  There a so many issues that could be the problem, I think if the support needs to be spread out.  This is also frustrating for students who are having problems and have to jump from tech to tech to get answers.  The instructor needs to have a team of help in their back pocket to quickly address student issues.  That may not always be available!
  • • Tailors instruction to meet the different needs of students, including different learning styles
    • dschaeferia
       
      I think one of the hurdles we need to jump is tailoring the needs of students. Finding the best fitting material for each learner can be a challenging.  How many different learning styles need to be address for each lesson?   Will address many learning styles per unit cause "too much information"?
  • Assists students with technology used in the course (Varvel III.C)
  • Demonstrates effective instructional strategies and techniques, appropriate for online education, that align with course objectives and assessment (S
    • accondon
       
      Teaching a course or content online is very different than teaching in the classroom.  It is a skill that needs to be mastered for effective instruction.  I think this one is important because the deliver of the content is crucially important for the success of an online course.
  • • Provides opportunities that enable student self-assessment and pre-assessment within courses
    • accondon
       
      Because a lot of online learning is self-paced, self-assessment is so important for individual growth.  If a person can self-assess and monitor their learning as they go, they are less likely to get "lost" in an online course.  The instructor may not always be available for immediate feedback which is why online learning requires a lot of responsibility on the part of the learner.  Formative self-assessment is crucial to successful learning in an online course.
  • Communicates with students effectively and consistently
    • annoleary
       
      I think feedback is important in any course, but it is even more important when the course is online. Without face-to-face contact, it is difficult to know if I am meeting the criteria of an assignment. It is also less convenient to ask my classmates about their work. The feedback helps me to know if I'm on the right track!
  • Understands and uses data from assessments to guide instruction
    • annoleary
       
      Yes! I think the purpose of assessments is to show what your students have learned. If many of them have difficulty, the teacher should take the time to reteach the lesson, ideally in a different format to reach different learning styles. If many students don't understand the lesson, the teacher hasn't taught it properly for that particular group. Maybe she used techniques that have worked well for other groups, but the assessment tells you if that particular group understands what you are attempting to teach; if they don't understand the lesson, you haven't truly "taught" it.
  • Understands student motivation and uses techniques to engage students
    • karolynzeller
       
      This is something I'll be interested to dig into and see how the things I use in class would apply online to peak student's interest and engagement.
  • reates a learning community that encourages collaboration and interaction, including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content
    • karolynzeller
       
      This was probably the most surprising part of current online classes to me, how social and collaborative they have become. It's actually harder to hold back on participation (if someone was inclined to) online than it is in a face to face class.
tkofoot

Best content in OLLIE Iowa | Diigo - Groups - 5 views

    • mgoodwin5
       
      Articles: Preparation-Whatever you are presenting needs to have a story behind it-somehow-as well as making the story interesting. Most of the time presentations can be given by doing so with personal experiences. Personally, I love hearing about other's personal experiences when it comes to pertaining to my career and their lives, due to the fact that it helps me learn from them. I feel by incorporating into the presentation some personal experience, this allows the presenter to be more comfortable in front of the audience, know their material well, and the audience will remember the presentation. Many presenters do a great job of incorporating comedy into their presentations, which adds to the creativity and helping the audience relate and remember the content.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      Awakenings - There seems to always be a way to tie in a story.  I agree that humor always adds more to it.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      Awakenings - Six words - I have broken this rule so many times!  This will be a hard one for me to break.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      Awakenings - Also I have sat through many boring powerpoints.  Need to really focus on how much time I have and what exactly I need to get accomplished.  Plan!
    • mgoodwin5
       
      Articles: Preparation-This statement has a lot of meaning to it about going first. There are many people that are not able or willing to stay for the last part of the conference, seminar, etc., due to travel time or other obligations that they may need to leave for. I've been there! And the amount of time you as the presenter takes on the presentation, you definitely do not want to only have a small portion of the audience to hear you present. Use this chance to be the first to get done with your presentation and not worry about waiting until later and not having the audience.
  • “Personalized” learning is something that we do to kids; “personal” learning is something they do for themselves. In a world where we can explore almost every interest or passion in depth on our own or with others, it’s crucially more important to have the dispositions and the skills to create our own educational opportunities, not be trained to wait for opportunities that someone else has selected for delivery.
    • sheilig
       
      I read another article by Bray and McClaskey that said personalization is learner-centered and differentiation is teacher-centered. In this article it seems they are saying "Personalized" learning is teacher-centered and "Personal" learning is learner-centered. I agree we need to give the kids the skills and tools to create their own learning. The problem solving and organizational skills they learn from doing things for themselves is much more valuable than any standardized test we ask them to take. If they are in charge of their learning when they are young, hopefully they will become life-long learners.
  • ...6 more annotations...
    • theatregoddess
       
      I struggle the most with technology--just because it is constantly changing and I teach online at several places--all of use different platforms.
  • technological knowledge
    • theatregoddess
       
      Playing around with stuff here--but, once again, not a techie. However, most places have tech desks and I don't think it is bad at all to have students call them. I just sent an Iowa Central student to the tech desk with a question. Now, if the question would have been on rhetoric, I would have answered it myself.
    • theatregoddess
       
      Technology is great--when it works.I struggle when it doesn't. Technology troubleshooting isn't my favorite thing.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      Technology opens so many doors and windows - but when it acts up it is the worst!
  • Aligns assessment with course objectives (SREB I.3, Varvel VI.C, ITS 5.a)
    • tkofoot
       
      With my special education students, aligning assessments with objectives helps us determine what we really need to students to learn if they have modified curriculum.
  • Communicates with students effectively and consistently
    • tkofoot
       
      This is so important to help them help guide their instruction and increase their self-advocacy skills in their classes.
  • The course instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning
    • tkofoot
       
      We need to make sure we meet all learning styles, so active learning will help us observe if those skills are being understood.
  • The course structure has flexibility to accommodate multiple timelines
    • tkofoot
       
      The flexibility helps students master curriculum.
Peggy Steinbronn

Welcome to the 30 Goals for Teachers! Cycle 6: Inspire Forward - 2 views

  •  
    The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators. Site contains a Software Reviews Database, articles from Technology & Learning Magazine, articles from Educators in Educators' eZine, Event and Contest listings, Reader suggested Web sites, and weekly news updates on education technology leaders."
  •  
    I just saw this same post and thought it looked interesting.
Peggy Steinbronn

Engineers Week is Feb 22-28 - here are some great resources on Engineering - 0 views

  •  
    The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators. Site contains a Software Reviews Database, articles from Technology & Learning Magazine, articles from Educators in Educators' eZine, Event and Contest listings, Reader suggested Web sites, and weekly news updates on education technology leaders."
Peggy Steinbronn

Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners - 0 views

  •  
    This post was originally published on the ThingLink Blog. Are you looking for resources and inspiring ideas to engage students in standards based 21st Century Learning experiences? We've got some amazing resources for you!
Kathy Hageman

Free Technology for Teachers: Common Craft Explains Blended Learning - 8 views

  •  
    Dare I ask this question in a group of Moodle users? Has anyone had experience using the Otus mobile learning environment?
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    I'm interested to know if the degree that this video matches your vision of blended learning? Where does the description match your thinking? Where did it not match or push your thinking?
  •  
    The video does a good job introducing the basics of blended learning, including tools and potential options for implementation. The video does not address the challenges brought about by either inequality of internet access or variables of motivation among students, both of which are serious teacher considerations when planning for blended learning.
  •  
    I thought it was interesting that the video included a reference to the 1940s. It is very possible that blended learning is even more key here, not just as it is defined, but because some of the resources to understand that time period are found more easily as physical artifacts and not as digital artifacts. Knowing what you are teaching and linking to the best resource is as important as selecting the instructional plan.
anonymous

American Rhetoric - 1 views

https://diigo.com/01w7au GREAT site for podcasts such as speeches for History, English classes, etc...

moodle_iowa OLLIE Iowa

started by anonymous on 02 Jun 14 no follow-up yet
anonymous

Changing Iowa: Metamorphosis of OLLIE 2 - 0 views

  •  
    Evan shares the changes made in the Technology for Online Instruction course over time. Evan makes the point that online courses should not be static -- once an instructor commits to teach online, there is continual updating.
Lylia Chaffin

ollie1sweetman: Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 11 views

  • Maintains an online social presence
    • Jean Bontemps
       
      This phrase always makes me nervous today. I am definately on the side of cautious about how much you interact with students socially online. Even the phrase "online social presence" isn't clear on what that means.
    • Nicholas O'Brien
       
      I agree, every other day there is some hullabaloo about interacting with students or privacy issues. I really wish there was a little more clarity out there about social media and educators.
    • Perry Bekkerus
       
      Agreed:  I've been communicating via Facebook with students for years, and have been using text messages for longer than that.  Students don't use emails anymore.  But then this fall, we were told that any texts to students need to be also sent to our AD.  What a waste of time.  And now we're going to set students up with their own gmail accounts???  We need to be giving them a lot more leeway with their cellphones and social networking sites.
  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student
    • Jean Bontemps
       
      I think we are definatley getting that right now! I love learning more about online tools for students, but I do feel a little overwhelmed about the amount of information and how to use it best in my classroom.
    • Nicholas O'Brien
       
      Agreed, there is a lot of stuff out there to keep track of, but at least as students we don't have to get it perfect. That's one of the up sides of being a student after all.
    • Janelle Schorg
       
      So much to learn. Need to pcik a focus and stick with it.
    • Rachael Woodley
       
      I like being in the student's position so I can catch the pitfalls and hangups that will frustrate on-line learners. Hopefully, this will help me make a clear focus and transitions in on-line classes that I build
    • Perry Bekkerus
       
      Being a student within this course has definitely opened my eyes as to what makes sense and what is difficult to follow...
    • Lynn Eastman
       
      Amen Perry! I think Moodle could be an entire coursework of class. I'd like to see our tech offerings to students get more up-to-date than simple word processing. The applications classes should also be more oriented to Google Docs, etc...
  • • Is knowledgeable and has the ability to use computer programs required in online education to improve learning and teaching, including course management software (CMS) and synchronous/asynchronous communication tools (chat, email, web 2.0, videoconferencing, webinar, whiteboard, etc.) (SREB B.3, Varvel III.B)
    • Nicholas O'Brien
       
      Well, this standard pretty much sums up why I am taking this course.
    • Heidi Reichart
       
      I agree. I think more information on creating an annotation was needed. I spent WAY too long messing with this.
  • ...27 more annotations...
  • Demonstrates growth in technology knowledge and skills in order to stay current with emerging technologies (SREB B.5)
    • Nicholas O'Brien
       
      Demonstrating growth isn't too tough, but picking the right emerging tech is.
    • Heidi Reichart
       
      With the thousands of tools out there, we can't try them all.
    • Lylia Chaffin
       
      Even when we find a technolgy we like the time involved to develop for just class is huge.
  • Maintains an online social presence that is available, approachable, positive, interactive, and sincere (SREB C.3, Varvel VII.A)
    • Heidi Reichart
       
      I don't think many teachers realize how difficult it is to monitor students online.
  • Assists students with technology used in the course (Varvel III.C)
    • Heidi Reichart
       
      I need to learn this myself to be able to assist students.
    • Janelle Schorg
       
      This would be a good opportunity to use recorded screencasts so students can watch it over and over.
    • A Hughes
       
      Diigo has a lot of potential. I wish that this was like Zotero and would do a bibliographic citation with my note.
    • Lynn Eastman
       
      I like the biliographic citation idea. I also wish the students had options to take courses like this during the academic year.
  • Identifies and communicates learning outcomes and expectations through a course overview/orientation
    • Janelle Schorg
       
      I need to post the expectations as outlined in my syllabus into my moodle course.
  • Has knowledge of learning theory appropriate to online learning, which may include (but is not limited to) age and ability level, multiple intelligences, didactic conversation, student developmental influences, constructivism, behaviorism, cognitivism, connectivism, and group theory
    • Janelle Schorg
       
      My students (teachers) are having a hard time with maneuvering around moodle.
    • Lylia Chaffin
       
      I am glad I am not trying to teach and use Moodle at the same time. I am having a hard time maneuvering around Moodle, too.
  • 4. Understands and uses instructional pedagogy that is appropriate for the online environment and meets the multiple learning needs of students (ITS 4)
    • Gayle Olson
       
      I think this whole section is critical! A friend of mine has taken a couple of online classes from a jr. college in another state. While the courses had instructors, they were mostly all automated. The instructor told the students there is nothing she/he can do to effect the grade (all automated online tests) or even help them understand what they did wrong. Just because something can be put online doesn't mean it is good quality learning. A course MUST be designed differently for online.
  • Creates a learning community that encourages collaboration and interaction, including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content
    • Gayle Olson
       
      One of my favorite sayings is that "None of us is as smart as all of us." When it comes to professional development, there is so much that the partcipants can learn from each other! Creating a professional learning community online takes effort. I think this will be one of my greatest challenges.
  • Demonstrates effective instructional strategies and techniques, appropriate for online education, that align with course objectives and assessment (SREB C.1, SREB G.6, Varvel V.C, ITS 3.d, ITS 4.b)
    • Gayle Olson
       
      Staying on top of this one will be a major effort - very connected to "7. Engages in professional growth". This will be something that is always ongoing, never finished.
    • Rachael Woodley
       
      I agree, constant changing and revision. Online learning is a very fluid medium as well and ever updating
  • • Creates or selects multiple assessment instruments that are appropriate for online learning
    • Rachael Woodley
       
      I think moodle does a better job of allowing multiple assessment techniques. We are kind of stuck with what we get from the PLATO program
  • Aligns assessment with course objectives
  • Tailors instruction to meet the different needs of students, including different learning styles, different interests and backgrounds, and students with special needs or whom are language learners
    • Lynn Eastman
       
      This used to be just the "sped" part of my job, but now we are all expected (rightfully) to differentiate.
    • Rachael Woodley
       
      In my experience on-line learning actually makes this part of the job much easier. You can build in visuals, audio, and other instructional strategies and the students can spend as much time on them as they need to
  • Demonstrates techniques for dealing with issues arising from inappropriate student technological use (SREB E.7)
    • Lynn Eastman
       
      This is getting more and more difficult as the immersion in technology continues. Students need direct instruction in ethics and technology, and heavy consequences need to be clearly stated by school boards for violations.
  • Understands and uses data from assessments to guide instruction
    • Rachael Woodley
       
      Very easy to use assement data and go back to "reteach" when the students can keep reviewing and make sure they've got the concept.
    • Perry Bekkerus
       
      Fair use and intellectual property rights have become so narrowly defined that practically everyone violates them in the education world.
  • Selects and uses technologies appropriate to the content that enhance learning
    • Perry Bekkerus
       
      This is especially tricky when it comes to music--finding resources and designing resources that are appropriate and useful to enhance learning in music, especially at an appropriate level.
    • Lylia Chaffin
       
      Aren't there some things that don't work well with technology? And isn't that O.K.?
  • integrity
    • Perry Bekkerus
       
      This is crucial for technology to remain a useful tool.  It is why so many teachers do not allow Wikipedia.
  • 4. Understands and uses instructional pedagogy that is appropriate for the online environment and meets the multiple learning needs of students (ITS 4) •
    • A Hughes
       
      Online learning works well with videos and pictures to illustrate the content. Uploading word documents that have been used in face to face content does not work well. The content needs to be transformed to a "lesson" format with font changes and graphics.
  • • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face (SREB C.1, Varvel V)
  • • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face (SREB C.1, Varvel V)
  • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face (SREB C.1, Varvel V)
  • • Communicates with students effectively and consistently (SREB D.1, ITS 1.g)
    • A Hughes
       
      Multiple methods of communication with the instructor are important in an online course. My outgoing e-mail was blocked for several weeks but Judy found other ways via Moodle to contact me.
  • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies (SREB J.7, ITS 1.c)
    • Lylia Chaffin
       
      I think expectations need to be posted more often than as an overview /orientation.
    • Lylia Chaffin
       
      Expectaions need to be posted more often than just at the beginning.
  • Networks with others involved in online education for the purpose of professional growth (SREB L.1, ITS 7.b)
    • Lylia Chaffin
       
      Net working with other teachers helps for personal development as well as professional. Others can really help problem solve.
  • Understands and uses course content that complies with intellectual property rights and fair use, and assists students in complying as well (SREB E.5, Varvel I.B)
  •  
    I am trying to post a comment under the "maintains an online social presence...". This is difficult to do considering the situations that can happen when teachers and students communicate together thru various websites... It doesn't take too many days of watching the news to find another incident of inappropriateness between teacher and student.
Deanna Etherington

Screenr | Instant screencasts: Just click record - 0 views

  •  
    Here is another screencasting tool that I came across while doing some research on Jing.
Deanna Etherington

Jing Learning Center - 0 views

  •  
    This site has several Jing tutorials. In addition to handouts, there's also video tutorials and "hands-on" walkthroughs.
  •  
    Looks like a helpful site if you wish to learn how to use Jing.
Seth Denney

ollie1: Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 3 views

  • Tailors instruction to meet the different needs of students
    • Marcia Boberg
       
      The majority of trainings I am involved in are ones that require participants to use some type of technology from low to high tech. Knowing where my participants are starting at is so important to my planning and being able to individualize techniques to meet them where they are comfortable. This is the only way I get buy in and eventual implementation.
    • Kim Wise
       
      Totally agree. How have you assessed their prior knowledge?
    • Marcia Boberg
       
      I started using Google Forms a couple years. Since all my trainings revolve around technology I like to get a feel for whether the learner (typically adult) is a technology novice or an early adopter. Have had the full range.
    • Seth Denney
       
      If I'm in a face-to-face training, I usually start with a five-finger assessment: rate your knowledge of this thing from zero to five, and hold up that many fingers. Just by looking around the room, you get a feel for their comfort level. A Google Form would be a very easy way to do the same thing.
  • Understands and uses data from assessments to guide instruction
    • Kim Wise
       
      I think this would be difficult in a course you set up prior to instruction..how to be flexible and responsive to learning..
    • C Richardson
       
      I'm thinking about that too, how would you set up a course that could be responsive to each learner? I was thinking part of the responsiveness might occur with pacing. That if you're skilled at one of the 'assignments' you wouldn't have to spend time on all the tutorials. What I don't understand is how an instructor would change an online course once it is created and students are enrolled...?
    • Anne Michel
       
      We do an assessment at the beginning of our courses to see where teachers are with the content.
  • Provides substantive, timely, and constructive feedback to students
    • Kim Wise
       
      Challenging if you have a hundred participants. Also requires very clear targets so feedback can be about the LEARNING.
    • Leisa Breitfelder
       
      You have made a good point Kim. I also think from a students perspective if you are taking the class for credit timely feedback is highly important to know if you are matching teacher expectations. I can see how for an instructor this would be very difficult with a hundred participants.
  • ...27 more annotations...
  • Assists students with technology used in the course
    • Seth Denney
       
      Sometimes it's hard for me to remember that I use technology all the time, and many people don't. I have to remember to provide scaffolding for people that are not only learning the content of my course, but are also learning the technology I'm using to deliver the content and assess their learning.
    • Marcia Boberg
       
      This is so true. One of the big challenges I am facing this Fall is not only how to provide support to staff on the use of iPad apps, which does lend itself to some online PD, but how do I demo and assist attendees with the divice navigation piece? I don't seem to have the correct tools to do a live demo or recorded demo showing such things as pushing the home button twice, practicing gestures etc..
    • Leisa Breitfelder
       
      This is one I was going to place an annotation on too. If a student gets stuck on the technology that I have embedded in Moodle then I need to be able to be an expert and walk them through it. There is nothing more frustrating than being a student, having questions on not the content but the tools in the course, and a teacher who is unable to assist and send you to someone else.
    • Vicki Carr
       
      You're absolutely right. It's very frustrating to have difficulty using tools that seem to make understanding the content difficult.
  • Maintains an online social presence that is available, approachable, positive, interactive, and sincere
    • Seth Denney
       
      Maintaining an online social presence can be very time consuming, depending on your other job responsibilities.
    • Deanna Etherington
       
      I agree with both of you that it's important to keep it manageable.  I think facilitating an online class could be a good lesson in time management.  I like the idea of online office hours and the ability for your to reach you in multiple ways.  I think you need to make a multi-faceted plan and stick to it as a personal commitment to yourself.
    • Dawn Witt
       
      I am currently teaching a fully online course for Morningside right now, and I am finding that I have to force myself to stop and not spend so much time online. Students think they need immediate feedback, and I typically feel as if I need to give that feedback. Noticing I have more to do with this class, work, and family, I just can't be online 2-3 hours every night addressing their questions. I'm learning to set boundaries and making students accountable for deadlines.
  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student
    • Seth Denney
       
      Hmm, we seem to be doing that right now...
    • Andrea Danker
       
      I appreciate so much more the student perspective and it will make me more consious of trying to develop an understandable format to improve their opportunities to learn online.
    • Terri Bush
       
      If we can empathize with a student, it make the relationship that much stronger...
    • Betty Brummett
       
      I am one that has never taked an online class before this. It is necessary to experience an online class to be able to construct a decent class for others to take online. I am learning so much by doing this.
  • Selects and uses technologies appropriate to the content that enhance learning (SREB M.3, Varvel IV.D, ITS 3.e, ITS 4.f)
    • Deanna Etherington
       
      I agree with some of the other posts that it's important not to use technology for technology's sake.  Just because you can, doesn't mean you should include it.  Sometimes I am "wow"ed by a technology and find it tempting to use without thinking about whether it's the most appropriate in a particular case.  That's one reason why I hope to gradually learn a wide variety of online tools so I can better determine which tool to use when - and if at all.
  • uses techniques to engage students
    • Seth Denney
       
      We have to remember that technology alone isn't enough to engage students. Just because it has a screen and buttons doesn't mean people will learn.
    • Terri Bush
       
      Student engagement at a high level will be key in improved student achievement.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Amen!!!! If students are not engaged in the methods being used to teach them or in the learning process in some way, teaching becomes a mute point!
  • sessment instruments that are a
  • uses techniques to engage students
    • Andrea Danker
       
      I think young learners especially will be extremely engaged in an online learning environment and easily able to manipulate the technology and get the most out of their learning.
  • opportunities that enable student self-assessment and pre-assessment
    • Marcia Boberg
       
      I have not mastered this at all, but I do keep trying! So many times I have found that staff participating in trainings I conduct, come with the feeling that they have no background knowledge in what I will be addressing. I view it as my responsibility to help them draw connections between what they are already doing or know how to do and what I will be presenting. Ideally I try to develop a pre assessment the uses their current knowledge and will help them make the connection to what the training will entail. When I succeed at this anxiety levels are lowered and the training goes smoothly and retention seems to be improved.
  • Designs the structure of the course and the presentation of the content to best enhance student learning, including using unit/lesson overviews and reviews, using patterns in lesson sequencing, and using appropriate visual web design techniques (SREB C.14, Varvel V.F)
    • Leisa Breitfelder
       
      I think it is very important to keep the technology structured. When you are teaching face-to-face there is usually an agenda, planned breaks, planned activities, etc. Careful considerations need to be taken when structuring an online course too. I am finding with this class a consistent set up helps me feel much more comfortable and I can focus on content and not get held up on the technology.
  • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the course
    • Leisa Breitfelder
       
      This is going to be very important especially in just beginning to teach online classess. Feedback will help improve the course and improve the chances of participants recommending the course to others. Colleagues of mine put together a course, asked for feedback, and learned their quizzes weren't working on every section. Pretty important to know but nobody said anything until they were asked for feedback.
  • Creates a learning community that encourages collaboration and interaction, including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content
  • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students
    • Vicki Carr
       
      We can't assume that all teachers have a deep understanding of the content to be taught
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Are you referring to the teachers taking the course or the teacher teaching the course? If a teacher has choosen to teach an online course, I would hope they have a deep understanding of the material/content being taught otherwise they shouldn't be teaching the class.
  • Promotes learning through online collaboration group work that is goal-oriented and focused
  • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face (SREB C.1, Varvel V)
    • Jody Albertson
       
      I think this standard is particularly essential to teaching online successfully. We have to realize that online learners have different needs than students we are teaching face to face, and our instruction must change accordingly.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      I agree completely! After taking a couple of online courses and then teaching face to face courses, it is a completely different teaching and learning experience.
  • Communicates with students effectively and consistently (SREB D.1, ITS 1.g)
    • Jody Albertson
       
      This is another critical standard. Online learners can feel very disconnected and disengaged from the course. They can feel like it is difficult to communicate with instructors or classmates. Instructors need to communicate effectively and frequently to keep our learners engaged.
  • Demonstrates growth in technology knowledge and skills in order to stay current with emerging technologies
    • Dawn Witt
       
      First, if we have students go to a link or a tool that is no longer accessible for some reason, that could be a bit of a problem and would hold the class up. Also, staying up-to-date on new technologies and skills provides many more opportunities to incorporate tools into a course to make the delivery of the content of the course as accessible and appropriate as possible
  • Understands and uses course content that complies with intellectual property rights and fair use, and assists students in complying as well
    • Dawn Witt
       
      I think this would be an area that would be easy to find yourself getting into trouble with. We need to give credit where credit is due, and gain permission from owners of sites, materials, etc. before using them. With so much information out there, we want to make sure we have quality information, without trampling on the rights of those who created the material.
  • ifferent learning styles, different interests and backgrounds, and
    • Pam Elwood
       
      Learning styles is an interesting concept to be included in teaching standards. Recently I have been studying the research for another class. I have always trained PD considering learning styles and consider myself a "visual" learning, I also have taught Gardner's theory to teachers, however there is little empirical research to support this concept. In fact in our years of Every Child Reads work, they had this listed as a myth to reading strategies! If you want to consider this as a myth, here is a link you might be interested in; www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIv9rz2NTUk
    • Pam Elwood
       
      Link not working. Search Youtube for learning styles a myth and you will find it.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Maybe rather than referring to the visual, auditory or kinesthetic needs of a learner, they are referring to whether a student learns better by reading material and "digesting" it on their own vs. collaborating with others over the material read; showing they have an understanding of the material by video taping a lesson in their classroom vs. writing a learning log of the lesson: lesson description, what went well, what they would change, what didn't work, etc. Just a thought!
  • Demonstrates effective instructional strategies and techniques, appropriate for online education
    • jquandahl
       
      Our OLLIE courses will be important in helping me to be able to meet this standard. I need to explore the instructional strategies and techniques that are appropriate for online education and find the ones that will best meet the needs of students in my courses.
  • Selects and understands how to evaluate learning materials and resources that align with the context and enhance learning
    • jquandahl
       
      It is always important to align resources and learning materials with learning goals and choose the things that will enhance learning. I find that it is easy to get caught up in all the cool web 2.0 tools out there and I need to remind myself to focus on the things that will help students meet their learning goals.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      I believe it is so important for a teacher to constantly evaluate the data being collected in their "classroom" - whether it's an assignment or journaling, etc - to evaluate if the instructional strategies that they are using to teach the course are actually helping the students to learn or causing more confusion! It is only by analyzing the data collected from the students in various forms that a teacher can truly know if their methods are helping the students learn and if they are not, by changing those strategies or methods so that the information is more accessible/understandable to the student. Teaching is only truly effective if the students are also learning!
  • Identifies and communicates learning outcomes and expectations through a course overview/orientation (Varvel IV.A, ITS 3.b)
    • Andrea Compton
       
      I wish ALL teachers would do this, including middle school and high school teachers!! I feel it is so important to make sure students know what they are going to be learning in a course and the expectations of how they will be learning the material presented. Otherwise, students are going in blind to the reality of what the course is all about and how they will be expected to learn the information.
    • Betty Brummett
       
      You are so right, Andrea. In my learning about formative assessment, I have learned that it is critical that students know what the expectations and the learning goals so that they will know if they are on the right track. It is very difficult for students to self-evaluate if they do not know what the learning goal is.
  • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies
    • Andrea Compton
       
      A teacher is only teaching if the students are learning! I believe it is so important for a teacher to look at their class data (coursework) to determine if the students are learning or able to learn the material being presented. If all the students or a majority of them are failing, it's probably not the students fault as much as it is the teachers. Teachers need to be open to changing their instructional strategies based on the needs of the students, and if the students are not learning then it's time for a change!!
  • • Aligns assessment with course objectives
    • Betty Brummett
       
      Through learning with formative assessent the assessment must be aligned with the course abjectives. It is entirely unfair to assess something that is not a part of the objectives, and students will be quick to point that out. The course objectives must be the guide for all that is done in the class.
  • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students (SREB A.3, Varvel II.A, ITS 2.a)
    • Belinda Blackbur
       
      The idea that one might start an online course AND learn the content at the same time seems like a recipe for disaster to me! While I consider mystelf a lifelong learner and there are new things to learn all the time, if I had to study conetent to stay one step ahead of my students in an online course AND develop the tools, it would be one daunting task!!
  • management software
lisa rasmussen

ollie4: Article: Attributes from Effective Formative Assessment (CCSSO) - 13 views

  • One key feature of this definition is its requirement that formative assessment be regarded as a process rather than a particular kind of assessment. In other words, there is no such thing as “a formative test.”
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      I often times hear teacher speak of formative assessment as a noun instead of a verb. (e.g. They gave their students a formative assessment today.)
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      You hit the nail on the head.
    • Maryann Angeroth
       
      What role does homework have in formative assessment?
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      Our administrators are telling us to do more formative assessments, they are also treating it like a noun.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      These courses have helped me recognize the difference in using the formative assessment as a "process" rather than a type of test. It makes a big difference in when and why a teacher uses the strategy.
    • Perry Bekkerus
       
      Ours are as well. I think formative assessment is any kind of data that helps a teacher decide what to do next in the classroom. For instance, as a music teacher, I can listen to kids sing a particular passage as a formative assessment; if they all sing it well, they are ready for another passage. If no one is getting it, then I need to slow down the passage until they have a better handle on it. If some are getting it and others aren't, then I usually try to improve another aspect of the passage (dynamics, diction, etc.) so that the strugglers get more practice on the pitches without boring the kids who already know the notes. In essence, by differentiating, I kill two birds with one stone. The formative assessment (i.e. listening to them sing it the first time) is the crucial piece here...if I just assume that they know it (or don't know it), then I have made assumptions about their background knowledge. That is the purpose of formative assessment: an assessment that formulates some further action or inaction.
  • there are a number of formative assessment strategies that can be implemented during classroom instruction.
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      In Science CABs we have shared the book, "Science Formative Assessment: 75 Practical Strategies for Linking Assessment, Instruction, and Learning," by Page Keeley. The teachers seem to really like a lot of these strategies and plan on using them in their classrooms.
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      Teachers don't want to know the theory and research behind a strategy...they just want the strategy or strategies that will help them help their students. I'm not a science teacher but the book you refer to sounds like a great resource for science teachers.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      Thanks for the resource.
  • Learning Goals and Criteria for Success: Learning goals and criteria for success should be clearly identified and communicated to students.
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      This year in Science CAB, we have started using Learning Goals and Success Criteria with the participants. We try to post these on the PowerPoint, so everyone can see them. However, our learning goals . . . and possibly even our success criteria need work.
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      Throught my work with Margaret Heritage and the Iowa Core, I found this to take much more time than I thought it would. I am still learning about how to write clear learning goals and success criteria. Practice will eventually make perfect, but I have a long ways to go!
    • jalfaro
       
      The first principal I worked for required that all of us clearly post the learning objectives for the day or week on our white boards. He wanted the students to know at the beginning of class what the goal was for the day and what they were expected to do. Transparency shows that we'd thought about our lesson and that the students were a part of the equation. Thinking back to my own education, I know there were too many moment when I was left wondering what we were really trying to do and why it was important!
    • Dirk Troutman
       
      Any lesson or course with clear learning objectives will be a success, any without it is unlikely to succeed.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Is it really just a matter of "communicating" goals and criteria to students? Wouldn't students benefit from being involved in the process of identifying goals and criteria?
    • Mark McGaffin
       
      Purpose for the lesson and outcomes for the students (what they will be able to do).  The students need to understand what they will be learning and how they will show it (rubrics).
    • Jean Van Gilder
       
      Also we need to communicate as instructors with our students as to how what they are learning applies in their "real" lives.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      A technique that I have used lots when starting a new topic is to ask the students what they hope to gain from it. That helps me call their attention to specific spots when we learn the new info. It also gives me their language, so I know better what words to use so they will be able to understand the concepts by connecting them to what is already familiar to them. It's powerful, especially when they see me referring to the list to see if we have met everyone's goals.
  • ...64 more annotations...
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      The "and students" is important here. I often observe formative assessement being referred to as primarily for the teacher and not about how useful it is for students.
    • Gary Petersen
       
      I would agree. Most often I think of "informing instruction" as helping the teacher and do not look at "informing learning" as part of the process to help students.
  • used by teachers and students to inform instruction and learning during the teaching/learning process.
    • Jean Van Gilder
       
      I hate to say it; but we were using formative assessment long before the conference that defined it came about...but we can all work on improvement.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      I agree that teachers are (were) very good at using formative assessment. Sometimes I wonder if when the standardized and accountability measures were put in place, teachers stepped away from their good prtactice because someone else was telling them that NCLB was the "real" measurement. Maybe we lost something?
    • David Olson
       
      I like that this definition is to provide evidence. This shows we are really doing it.
  • The process requires the teacher to share learning goals with students and provide opportunities for students to monitor their ongoing progress.
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      Again, so important to include the student in the process, which is something that is often overlooked.
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      With user friendly, clearly stated targets for the students.
    • Sandy Kluver
       
      Giving students time to reflect and learn about themselves.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      It would be appropriate to add one more thought to this sentence: rather than teachers merely sharing learning goals, students should be involved in determining their goals.
    • Pam Buysman
       
      Haven't we learned that using rubrics to share expectations for students aids in learning. I've been learning the SINA process this past week. One of the focuses of the school in this process was making sure students and also parents knew and understood the standards and benchmarks used in their instruction. Sounds like they chose something that will increase student achievement!
    • Jean Van Gilder
       
      All important to involve the students; they can't just sit and absorb learning they have to actively particiapate in all facets!
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      For "experienced" teachers it is a big shift from the teacher-controlled lecture to student-led learning. It is exciting to see the students actively engaged, but hard at first to "facilitate" and utilize the "teachable moments". It requires extra preparation, constantly evaluation of habits, and patience to wait for students to take ownership of the discussions and learning.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      I agree with Kathy - having the students involved in helping to set the learning goals would be great! Either way, having the students clued in to what the learning goals are is a big step to help them sort out the important pieces.
  • Learning progressions describe how concepts and skills build in a domain
    • Lori Pearson
       
      This section makes me think about the Iowa Core and how it really builds from kindergarten. Teachers are often made more aware of how a skill is "built" from the ground up.
    • Denise Krefting
       
      Lori- the Iowa Core needs to be in the front of our thought process! :)
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      Our biggest Iowa Core question may be, who develops learning progressions. Given the amount of time they take to develop, how can the state/AEAs/LEA work toward accomplishing this very important task?
    • Deb Versteeg
       
      We have done some learning progression work as a state through some of our state content teams, but much more needs to be done in light of the Iowa Core and a broader audience needs to be involved.
    • Becky Hinze
       
      Learing progressions must be understood by all teachers. Margaret Heritage talks extensively about this being a major problem. If teachers don't understand these progressions, they won't know how to go backwards or forwards if students don't understand or have mastered concepts. IC helps some with this, but not perfectly.
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      I feel like we barely got started with this process at our last meeting. I hope we spend more time on it, as I feel that learning progressions are an important part of formative assessment, and we may not get the results we want without them.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      We have spent a lot of time talking about who should develop learning progressions. In our district we use the phrase "unpacking the standard". We go back and forth. In some cases, it seems as though the teacher and student should own that learning. But sometimes, teachers, particularly in the elementary school where teachers are more generalists, they do not have the depth of content knowledge to develop rigorous learning progressions.
  • Descriptive
    • Lori Pearson
       
      I also think of the word "constructive."
    • terri lamb
       
      Constructive would be a great addition to this and is implied but should be evident.
  • Helping students think meta-cognitively
    • Lori Pearson
       
      Many points in this article are connected to not only effective formative assessment, but also in the bigger realm of effective instruction.
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      Totally agree - we need to teach students to intuitively know when and how to use a variety of learning and/or problem solving strategies. Schools need to focus on 1 - 2 strategies in every content area (Cornell Notetaking or Kansas Strategies) so the students really apply every day the learning strategies to help them learn all content, vocabulary, etc.
    • Lisa Buss
       
      Students have to 'see' the value in learning. If they are accountable for their own, it'll have much more meaning to them.
    • Jessica White
       
      Yes, that metacognition piece is so vital. Students really need to start thinking about their thinking.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      I agree with all of you. Effective instruction means knowing where your students are. Formative assessment is one of the main ways that you know that. It's difficult to imagine truly effective instruction without formative assessment.
  • process used by teachers and students
    • Denise Krefting
       
      I like that students are a part of this process! We need to remember to have them assess themselves and each other as well.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I agree. When students take ownership of their own learning, there are so many more positive results.
    • Darin Johnson
       
      Thinking of formative assessment as a process is helpful for me. Like the writing process, it needs to become a highly personalized and organic activity for every teacher.
    • Lisa Buss
       
      I agree that it is a process, an on-going instruction that provides feedback. In one of my other classes, there was a lot of discussion about how the Google calendar allows us to use formative assessment and allows us to better know our students. I think the confusion was because they think we have to have a completed project to assess when in reality, all we are assessing is the 'process.'
    • Amy Burns
       
      The word "process" should be bold and scream out at us, as a reminder that assessment is not a one-shot deal, yet how often is that the case? We do ourselves and our students a disservice if we base our assessments on a single observavation or task.
    • Cheryl Carruthers
       
      yes, I think of the research process absolutely needing formative assessment embedded throughout the process. Too often, students proceed through a research project, getting all the way through to the final product with no feedback and then both the teacher and the student are disappointed by a poor grade. With formative assessment embedded within the research process, students are given the opportunity to gauge their own progress and success and make adjustments as needed. End result - a positive experience for both teacher and student.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      Must agree with others on the use of the word "process". As a district administrator, I often hear about students being over-tested. The possibilities of assessments being used formatively AND/or summatively is a process. Not everyone has made the shift.
    • Kevin McColley
       
      Amy, I love your comment on Google calendar! I truly think you nailed it on the head with your response. Verbatum I agree with you 100% and hope that things start backing the process rather than an assignment.
    • Gary Petersen
       
      I have heard some look at formative assessment as a product or test vs. the broader "interactive process."
  • partners
    • Denise Krefting
       
      Working as partners allows us to model better for our students and they to model for each other.
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      And the teacher has to work on modeling so that the students can best see how this works. The culture of the classroom is something that must be nutured, it does not always occur naturally.
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      I have found that teachers do not like to be vulnerable and have someone critique their teaching. The team must first establish trust with the peers they will be working with and understand that it is not to critique but to share ideas for improving teaching and learning for all.
    • Julie Townsend
       
      Collaboration is a difficult thing to create, because it takes the entire crew to effectively do so! 
    • Maryann Angeroth
       
      The AIw process has a perfect venue to allow teachers to score each others instruction based on a series of rubrics.
    • Tim Brickley
       
      The trust factor between teachers and students is so important to establish the partnership.  But it is hard to maintain classroom management and show vulnerability.
  • sense of trust between and among students
    • Denise Krefting
       
      This will take time for students to trust each other. What scaffolding steps should teacher take before collaboration can be effective?
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      The classroom culture is set by the teacher - a place where there is mutual respect, only use positive statements, encourage one another to do and be their best at all times, confront and discuss obstables, and have rules posted for working together so all students know what behavior is exptected of them.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      It is so important to build that trust and sense of teamwork. In choir, it may have been easier to see how we all needed to support and encourage each other, since the end result, the choir sound, included the sum of all members. A complicating, but perhaps helpful factor in a choir is the multiple grade levels represented. I always assign older, more experienced students and mentors for younger students. Most of the time this has worked well to build a team spirit within the group. The students do critique themselves and each other live and through recordings. Emphasis is always placed on encouraging and positive criticisms.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      The sense of trust among students must come from a teacher who models this in the classroom on a regular basis.
  • adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievement of intended instructional outcomes.
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      This is what seems to be most often missed--using the feedback to adjust both teaching AND learning.
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      We've had Lead & Learn out several times over the pasts three years to present to Data Teams. Consultants were assigned to buildings to work one-on-one with building Data Teams as well. It is a new concept for most of us - using data to drive instruction. Through the help of their awesome materials, our Data Team uses their 5 step process to collect and evaluate student data.
    • jalfaro
       
      Oh, Cindy! I'm so glad you mentioned those data teams (since we've been trained for the past 3 years). Data really is a key to classroom success...too many teachers just keep teaching even though students are begin left behind. Universities need to do a better job training new teachers how to NOT teach the way we've been teaching for the past century.
    • Nathan Fredericks
       
      I whole heartedly agree here. Too often I see this happening. It is amazing have often both teachers and students have been turned into technophobes in classrooms. I still have some students that dread doing things on the computers and all but refuse to do things with technology because they've never done it any other way.
    • Pam Buysman
       
      The word adjust is a huge word in this definition as well. Formative assessesment allows us to make changes in our teaching if what we are doing isn't having the desired result. These past two years I've spent a little time learning about the General Education Plan. If one intervention doesn't work, we need to adjust or change what we're trying. I think this is difficult for teachers as well. We get inpatient and we want to see results sooner rather than later. Yet, we need continue adjusting our instruction using the data to drive our teaching.
    • Becky Hinze
       
      Change instruction...that is what is missing!!!! Not just putting it into the grade book and moving on.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I am in agreement with most on the point in the past teachers see the data, but keep on teaching "to cover the content". We are beginning to recognize the need to change but it requires a change in techniques and mental approach. Similar to letting Standards drive what is taught instead of the lessons identifying which Standards are covered.
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      If teachers would use the feedback to adjust their instruction, I believe we would have fewer frustrated students! These two parts of the definition--process and using feedback to adjust teaching--are critically important in the whole school improvement process.
    • Gary Petersen
       
      This issue of ongoing adjustment is such a powerful concept.
  • integrated into instruction
    • Linda Hoobin
       
      My big learning in my study of formative assessment is that it must be planned, even informal assessment must be planned.
    • Sandy Kluver
       
      I agree. Purposeful teaching leads to better teaching and more learning by students.
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      This was an ah-ha for me too. It was during our Every Learner Inquires meetings that I first realized this. I worked with a teacher who write down the key questions he wanted to ask students during the lesson I observed him teaching. He addressed all the questions he had listed. However, just remember that you don't need massive quantiies of quality questions. A few well-thought out questions can go a long way.
    • Deb Versteeg
       
      Peggy, I appreciated your comment about just needing a few well-thought out questions. As educators we tend to overplan, which is fine, but we need to pull back the reigns when extended questioning etc. just isn't needed for thelearning to occur.
    • Mark McGaffin
       
      My district has worked extensively with teachers to identify a purpose and the measures we will use to assess their progress.  These key questions can be the measures along with a number of other strategies.  I agree that many teachers over plan, we need to realize it that some students will not get it and that we need to plan for some enrichment opportunities during the lesson.  This will help students stay on track.
    • Pam Buysman
       
      I agree that planning is important. Formative assessment must be a deliberate part of instruction.
    • Becky Hinze
       
      Integrated into instruction.....not taking away from instruction to teach!
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      It is so important that it be a part of the instruction process, and that students be informed of the importance of their role in this process.
  • the individual students.
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      And that's where differentiated instruction comes in, as well as differentiated assessment!
  • Because the formative assessment process helps students achieve intended learning outcomes based on explicit learning progressions, teachers must first identify and then communicate the instructional goal to students.
    • Sandy Kluver
       
      Explicit and communicate are the two words that jumped out at me in this sentence. Teachers need to be explicit and thoughtful with their planning and then students need to know what the intended goals are. It's hard to hit a moving target but if we do these two things our students should have success!
    • terri lamb
       
      I agree, explicit and communicated expectations and criteria need to be given for the student to reach the intended goals.
    • denise carlson
       
      In my work I'm frequently puzzled by the number of teachers that do not embrace the importance of clearly communicating expecations to their students
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      I also agree that criteria should be clear, otherwise a student does not know what direction they are heading.
    • Tim Brickley
       
      I think that sometimes the criteria and expectations are clear in my head but it is the communication that doesn't always follow through.  This happens to me the first time I assign a project or paper.  I learn after that first time.
  • Students then need time to reflect on the feedback they have received to make changes or improvements.
    • Sandy Kluver
       
      I think it's easy to hand back our papers with our feedback on it and then we move on to the next topic. But we need to go one step further and ask students to think about how they can improve the assignment based on the feedback. This might just be a quick write to get the students thinking about improving their learning.
    • terri lamb
       
      I agree, we often don't give time for this and it is an important process.
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      I also agree. And if a student hasn't mastered a skill/concept how (and why) would a teacher want to move on to a higher level skill?
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      An art portfolio with past work shows this growth, but students need to be shown what to look for.
  • about the particular qualities of student learning with discussion or suggestions about what the student can do to improve.
    • terri lamb
       
      Since improvement is the desired goal in formative assessment, this should be a priority.
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      Agree! And "disscussion or suggestions about what the student can do to improve" is key. Too many times students are given non-descriptive feedback and true learning and/or improvement does not occur.
  • that the interpretations reflect the intentions of those who make them (e.g., writers, archaeologists, historians, and filmmakers).
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      It is very important to remember that the interpretations of historical facts never happen in a vacuum, but always reflect the worldview of the interpreter. Our students need to learn to research the background of their sources and not just take everything presented to them at face value.
    • Cheryl Carruthers
       
      The American Memory web site (Library of Congress) has many historical artifacts that can be used in such a process. Historical inquiry is so powerful when students are able to make the connections that Deborah mentions above.
  • Where am I going? Where am I now? How can I close the gap?
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      Nice, concise questions for us to keep in mind as we plan objectives, goals, and formative assessment of the same.
    • Julie Townsend
       
      These are great questions! Sort of like the 'so what and who cares' questions I keep in mind when planning curriculum. Why am I teaching this and how will my students use it?
    • Darin Johnson
       
      These are awesome questions. I might have to make some posters!
    • Pam Buysman
       
      I agree that these are wonderful questions for anyone attempting to reach a goal. These questions are useful not only for feedback from a teacher but also provide a structure for student reflection
    • jalfaro
       
      We must respect our students and involve them in all of the past mysteries regarding teaching and learning. It should not be an I/you situation--"we" is the pronoun of choice for classroom success.
  • However, for students to be actively and successfully involved in their own learning, they must feel that they are bona fide partners in the learning process.
    • jalfaro
       
      Too often we use "I" and "you" when we should be using "we."
    • Gary Petersen
       
      This principle of being partners seems to start with the respect and trust of each role, (i.e., instructor and learner) in the assesssment process. If the process is interactive, then the teacher will be both instructor and learner as well as the student being instructor (during constructive feedback to the teacher) and learner.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      This is such a short paragraph with so many critical pieces in it! So much of what we know about how social/emotional factors impact learning gets shoved to the back of the agenda under the pressures of better test scores, etc., when it makes all the difference in the world, for exactly the reasons listed here.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      The person who has the biggest investment in the student's learning is the student. Students who understand this have the best outcome as life-long learners.
  • by realistic examples of those that meet and do not meet the criteria.
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      Like the emphasis on not only examples, but also non-examples. So important when teaching moving away from concrete to more abstract concepts (e.g., strengths and weaknesses of arguments). Along with discussion of the "whys" and "why nots".
    • Darin Johnson
       
      I sometimes use a college writing textbook with my students because every chapter has "professional" examples of the topic followed by two essays written by college freshmen. My "gifted and talented" students quite often attack the more realistic student essays. I have had some of the most interesting discussions as I push students to fairly and honestly identify the good qualities and areas still to improve in their own writing and in the writing of others.
  • Sharing learning goals and criteria for success with students, support
  • nvolving students
    • Julie Townsend
       
      Involvement--getting students to talk about what matters to them...how are they going to apply the lesson...asking them what else they might want to know1
  • appreciation of differences
    • Julie Townsend
       
      Showing students you appreciate their differences is a personality trait some teachers have more of than others. Cultivating this acceptance can improve the culture and climate of the classroom, and sometimes teachers can encourage with success, this trait in other teachers.
  • The teacher might first offer students a paraphrased version of that goal such as
  • n self-assessment, students reflect on and monitor their learning using clearly explicated criteria for success.
    • Lisa Buss
       
      Students learn best when they are responsible for their own learning.
  • Using the evidence elicited from such tasks connected to the goals of the progression, a teacher could identify the “just right gap” – a growth point in learning that involves a step that is neither too large nor too small – and make adjustments to instruction accordingly.
    • Darin Johnson
       
      This reminds me of the British expression "Mind the gap." This is a compelling argument, but I wonder about the simplicity of application. Is it feasible for a teacher to give "frequent feedback" of such a high quality that s/he is making sure that every students is in his/her zone of proximal development and then adjusting instruction accordingly. If teachers are to move away from industrialized models of education, then changes in the learning environment need to occur as well. I'm feeling like a Detroit auto executive in the late 1980s.
  • However, student- and peer-assessment should not be used in the formal grading process.
    • Darin Johnson
       
      Should teachers ever grade peer feedback? Students flock around Student A because she gives in-depth and insightful comments to their work. Student B finds to comma errors and tells his single partner that the essay is "good." Should these students be evaluated? Should they evaluate themselves? Or is this just punishing them with rewards? (I can't think of the title that I'm attempting to steal here.)
  • In this type of classroom culture, students will more likely feel they are collaborators with their teacher and peers in the learning process.
    • Jean Van Gilder
       
      I like the word collaborators used in describing the students in what we are working toward for all classrooms.
  • n addition to teacher feedback, when students and their peers are involved there are many more opportunities to share and receive feedback.
    • Amy Burns
       
      I think we leave peer and self-assessment behind in the quest to accomplish all that is required in a 45 minute class period. There are so many online tools and formats that might fill the need for increased peer and self-assessment. Why not encourage backchannel reflections during a presentation? A site such as http://www.chatzy.com/advanced.htm might be one way for this to be accomplished.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Do you like Chatzy better than TodaysMeet?
  • in an eighth grade writing class the students are learning how to construct an argument. They are focusing specifically on speech-writing and have examined several effective speeches, both from prominent speech-makers in history and from previous years’ eighth grade students.
    • Joletta Yoder
       
      Like this lesson idea. I wonder what speeches they are listening to or viewing. I wonder how one can get these to share in class.
  • What can you do to improve or strengthen your opening paragraph?”
    • Joletta Yoder
       
      This is a great way to give feeback on a weak element in writing because it causes interaction with the student, dialogue, reflection, and revision. One can be sure that with this simple question the student will revise and, in turn, grow as a writer.
    • Natalie Smithhart
       
      I agree, this is a great questin for students to think about their work and revise it on thier own, without being told what to write.
  • purposefully planned
    • David Olson
       
      The key si PLANNED, not just incidental
  • In addition to communicating the nature of the instructional goal, teachers must provide the criteria by which learning will be assessed so that students will know whether they are successfully progressing toward the goal. This information should be communicated using language readily understood by students
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      This section brings to mind last week's discussion of rubrics - clear expectations expressed in student-friendly language. While I think of rubrics as guides for students, I also think of them as summative assessment tools. Is there a blurring of summative and formative assessment?
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      I think they can be blurred. Once the purpose of an assessment is identified, it can be used a number of different ways. ITBS can be formative if data is examined with a formative task in mind just as much as it can be summative. Not?
    • David Olson
       
      Sometimes criteria is better than a rubric.
  • Learning goals and criteria for success should be clearly identified
  • 4. Self- and Peer-Assessment: Both self- and peer-assessment are important for providing students an opportunity to think meta-cognitively about their learning.
  • close the gap between students’ current understanding and the desired goals
  • goals
  • goals
  • goals
    • Nathan Fredericks
       
      I definitely think this is very important to look at in the big picture. There are school SMART goals that need reached as well as individual student goals. The two cannot be mutually exclusive and too often they are thought to be so.
    • David Olson
       
      It should say best used by educators AND LEARNERS, since it is all about how students learn, as well as, how we teach
    • David Olson
       
      and used by students, too.
    • David Olson
       
      Students are also important
    • David Olson
       
      Students are also important
    • David Olson
       
      The importance of students is not mentioned
    • David Olson
       
      Students are important also.
    • David Olson
       
      Studetn involvement is important
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      Students are important.
  • instruction. A second important part of the definition is its unequivocal requirement that the formative assessment process involve both teachers
  • There are five attributes that have been identified from the literature as critical features of effective formative assessment
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      This outline of 5 attributes is very powerful! Easy for any teacher to get their hands around this. I could see PLCs spenind an entire year talking about even on eor two of these or a principal developing walk-through with these. Thanks for including this article in our reading.
  • To support both self- and peer-assessment, the teacher must provide structure and support so students learn to be reflective of their own work and that of their peers, allowing them to provide meaningful and constructive feedback.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      A former colleague had her students use MovieMaker to record messages to their parents for conferences. She reported that students were thoughtful and sincere as they described accomplishments as well as goal areas.
    • Gary Petersen
       
      Students are not automatically reflective. Providing support and feedback to the student on how they are utilizing formative assessment makes sense.
    • Nathan Fredericks
       
      I think it is important to make sure that students have the structure and organization necessary to help assist their learning. The management piece of this cannot be forgotten.
  • students can be encouraged to be self-reflective by thinking about their own work based on what they learned from giving feedback to others
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Perhaps this would help students learn to provide better feedback to peers. Even after teacher modeling, many students have difficulty moving beyond superficial compliments to provide thoughtful, constructive comments.
    • Jean Van Gilder
       
      This does take alot of practice for students.
  • two stars and a wish
    • Natalie Smithhart
       
      I like this idea! It seems like a good (friendly and safe) way for peers to evaluate each other. Since each student is required to give a "wish" nobdy should get upset about providing or receiving a suggestion for improvment.
    • Pam Buysman
       
      I like this as well. Phrasing can be so important. This puts everything in a very positive light. Instead of this is what you did wrong, the wish looks at what you could do better. The outcome is the same, however.
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      I have seen this in action before, and it really does help the feedback to be constructive and not offensive.
  • non-threatening environment
    • Natalie Smithhart
       
      I like this part best! As early childhood teachers we understand the importance of a "safe" learning environmnet. Children need to feel secure in thier environment in order to be able to give and accept feedback and learn to the best of thier abilities! :)
    • Maryann Angeroth
       
      Have we taught students that feedback is punative and not for encouragement and to extend the learning/
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      I agree that this has to be established, first. I often encourage teachers to take those first couple of weeks of school to establish that atmosphere of trust--not just between the teacher and students, but also between students and students. Then the focus can be on learning!
  • Formative assessment is not an adjunct to teaching
    • Pam Buysman
       
      Formative assessment is essential to learning. It's something that is NOT supplementary or something that might be nice to do. Formative assessment imust be part of teaching and learning. Yet as I consider my educational career, it seems that formative assessment has become a buzz word in education only relatively recently. As we continue to look at ways to increase student achievement, formative assessment is something that needs to become a permanent part of our "educational vocabulary."
    • David Olson
       
      It is part of teaching, and has been, but it is an important new focus, and is being explained more explicitly than ever before.
  • they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning
    • Judy Griffin
       
      Students have to take ownership of their learning, and learn to monitor themselves. It's hard for teachers to let go of the reins!
    • Jean Van Gilder
       
      I agree that is one of the most difficult things; as we like to be in total control.
    • Maryann Angeroth
       
      Maybe it is time to let the students do the heavy lifting.
  • should avoid comparisons with other pupils
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      This is a really important statement, as I still remember being compared (not favorably) to other students in front of the entire class when in 6th grade.
    • Kevin McColley
       
      Too often I see kids comparing themself to their peers and if we can get away from this and focus on an assessment that underlines what the individual child is doing and improving off of year-to-year showing this to the student hopefully they will get a sense of fulfillment in knowing their is growth in their cognitive development.
  • teachers and students receiving frequent feedback
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      Sometimes feedback has a tendency to be one sided. It is good to see that both teacher and student should have feedback so that both can adjust.
    • David Olson
       
      This two way feedback is really an enhancement of the Madeleine Hunter model and goes beyond just the teacher checking for understanding.
    • Jessica White
       
      I like that it is stated that formative assessment is not an adjunct to learning, but integrated. It is part of our instructional process.
  • the teacher clarifies the goal for the student, provides specific information about where the student is in relation to meeting the criteria,
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      Just saying "good job" or "needs work" does not help a student. Specifics are important.
  • their responsibility and that they can take an active role in planning, monitoring, and evaluating their own progress
    • Deena Stanley-Dostart
       
      I think that this ties in with a student centered classroom. Students are responsible for their learning and not just relying on the teacher to be the sole provider of feedback.
  • For example, students can work in pairs to review each other’s work to give feedback.
    • Natalie Smithhart
       
      I like this idea, students can learn a lot from providing postive or constructive feedback for their peers. I would think it also helps them improve their own writing when they learn ideas from their peers.
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      I agree. With the teacher's guidance this is one of the best learning environments.
  • determine how formative assessment may best be used by the nation’s educators.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      This states "best used by" tells me that it should be a useful tool that reduces the daily tasks of the classroom teacher and not documentation tasks that sit on the bookshelf.
  • informal observations
    • Judy Sweetman
       
      Often the informal observations yield just as much information as the purposefully planned techniques. Walking around small groups and jotting down snippets of conversation gives a lot of information.
  • In the year following, the FAST SCASS and FA Advisory Group isolated the attributes that, based on the research and current literature, would render formative assessment most effective.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      Our district has been working with AfL for several years, but I have not had the opportunity to read this article before. It is great! Great synthesis and easily difenstible. Would love to (and intend to) use with principals and teachers.
  • itions of formative assessment and related research. The FA Advisory Group and FAST SCASS devoted substantial effort to clarify the meaning of “fo
  • the individual teacher
  • evidence
  • A teacher needs to have modeled good feedback
  • sufficient detail
    • Gary Petersen
       
      I often wonder how much I miss in my instruction or learning due to not enough specificity in many areas of the process. For examle, are the learning outcomes stated in enough detail; do the assessments provide enough detail, etc.?
  • They are able to connect formative assessment opportunities to the short-term goals to keep track of how well their students’ learning is moving forward.
    • Gayle Olson
       
      I think this is important for the students to know, also. Some learning styles have a difficult time learning one piece unless they can see how it fits into the bigger picture. Helping the students understand how the short term goals all fit together would be so helpful for these students. And formative assessment is a great way for both teacher and student to make sure they are on track.
  • through pictures, plays, films, reconstructions, museum displays, and fiction and nonfiction accounts
    • lisa rasmussen
       
      These creative activities for students use so many excellent questioning techniques as students compare and contrast, and in the evaluation and synthesis of ideas.
Jennifer Riedemann

Building A Better Mousetrap: The Rubric Debate - 7 views

  • Latin for “red”
    • jalfaro
       
      thinking of that red pen that makes my papers bleed...ouch!
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      Many science terms have Latin origins.
  • reliably score
    • jalfaro
       
      this still takes time and practice...it won't happen instantly after the creation of a new rubric...having examples to refer to helps keep the scorers on the same level
    • Cheryl Merical
       
      It also helps to have several people score a paper using the same rubric to check the rubrics reliability.
    • Cindy Blinkinsop
       
      We did an activity in a workshop I took where we all used the same rubric to score sample writings and even with the rubric in hand, I was amazed at how differently we all scored each of the samples. What I found acceptable, another educator did not and vice-versa.
    • Lori Pearson
       
      When I teach 6 traits classes, one of the most eye opening things that happens is when just as you described, Cindy, two people use the same rubric and they come up with different scores. That is why it is so important to practice scoring together and to have conversations around why you gave the score that you did.
  • on what students have actually learned rather than what they have been taught,
    • jalfaro
       
      the focus should always be on the student...the content comes second...truly teach your students and the content will follow
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      There's a difference between what the teacher has "taught" verses what students have actually learned.
  • ...51 more annotations...
  • The instructor’s comments on papers and tests are done after rather than before the writing, so they cannot serve as guidelines, compromising the value of writing comments at all.
    • jalfaro
       
      begin with the end in mind...it's how I function best!
  • raise the need of remediation
    • jalfaro
       
      and now there's a current study covering for-profit colleges' success rates and federal student loan defaults...it is imperative that we guide the students towards success...colleges can't afford to just weed out the undesirables without being held accountable in some manner
  • state writing test,
    • jalfaro
       
      this is very common in states like Florida where FCAT Writing is pushed from 3rd grade until 10th grade...that 5 paragraph format must be mastered if the student ever expects to graduate! Sad, but true!
  • Rubrics, Halden-Sullivan contends, reduce “deep learning” to “checksheets.”
    • jalfaro
       
      I would argue that large class sizes do the same...rubrics helped me survive through having too many students and too many essays to grade. Keep class sizes under control and give teachers adequate prep time and we'd be more than willing to provide deep and reflective feedback to each and every student.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      That is so true. Dealing with lots of students is a huge handicap for great teaching. I also think that we can design rubrics that allow for the freedom to write, not restrict it.
    • Darin Johnson
       
      Does Halden-Sullivan offer an alternative to rubrics?
    • Julie Townsend
       
      Again, I will maintain that it is within the space defined by a rubric that we have the freedom to create unlimited, reflective and insightful writings, artwork, power points, and other projects or assignments. Rubrics are only as confining as one lets them feel.
  • A holistic rubric
    • jalfaro
       
      How is this any different than A-F grading?
    • Jennifer Riedemann
       
      It's not really. A-F grading combines information from all sorts of criteria into one rating.