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bkoller86

"Personalized" vs. "Personal" Learning - 2 views

  • Educators at the EduCon conference hosted by Science Leadership Academy eagerly discussed the merits and challenges of personalizing learning. Dozens of teachers agreed that a truly personalized learning experience requires student choice, is individualized, meaningful and resource rich. This kind of learning allows students to work at their own pace and level, meets the individual needs of students, and perhaps most importantly, is not a one-size fits all model. Technology was strikingly absent from these conversations. Instead, the common view of personalization focused on giving agency for learning to the student and valuing each individual in a classroom.
    • anonymous
       
      So do the students get the necessary skills first from the teacher then are able to choose what they want to learn about? How would a teacher then keep track of how they are learning?
    • djarends
       
      I wonder that. Would they use the portfolio method? I also wonder about the choice issue. How is this being accomplished? Are they given the assignment / task and have choice within the project or do they have complete choice over what they learn? 
    • kbolinger
       
      I was wondering some of these same things too. How do students get the necessary prerequisite skills needed to complete their chosen task...the teacher? a computer? If you have 25 students and they all want/need to learn about a concept in different way or they choose different projects at multiple levels of learning, how does one teacher possibly manage that? Are young students able to have as much choice as older students or does that increase as students grow and understand more about themselves as a learner?
  • However, in order to navigate the system of accountability in the U.S. educational system, many school district leaders require public school educators to teach a specific curriculum that will be evaluated on standardized tests, while at the same time telling teachers to be innovative and creative within their classrooms.
    • anonymous
       
      I would think there would be math and science teachers asking about how personalized learning would help students improve standardized test scores for those areas. Should the specific curriculum in the U.S. educational system be tweaked to allow more personalized learning? 
    • bkoller86
       
      I think there is a balance between personalized learning and standardized learning. I would like the end goal would be the same for everyone, but the road to get there would be personalized. 
  • Give them opportunities to learn personally, to create their own texts and courses of study, and to pursue that learning with others in and out of the classroom who share a passion.
    • anonymous
       
      I love this idea! As a Spanish teacher, I want to give them the skills for communication but then let them explore and learn what they want to learn how they want to learn - can't wait to explore that option!
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I agree! Students need to have the skills first then explore what and how they want to learn.
    • kkoller
       
      I like this idea because it teaches students to take ownership of their learning. It might also motivate those kids who constantly encounter on a daily basis that hate school. I wonder though from an elementary perspective, how do we change how we do things to better prepare our students for this kind of education?
    • bkoller86
       
      Whenever students and apply the skills to a passion of theirs students are able to see the purpose of courses they have taken. Students who struggle in math and science learn many of those skills in my agriculture class because they are engaged in a passion of theirs. 
  • ...25 more annotations...
  • From what I’ve seen, flipping doesn’t do much for helping kids become better learners in the sense of being able to drive their own edu
  • the best thing we can do for kids is empower them to make regular, important, thoughtful decisions about their own learning, what they learn and how they learn it, and to frame our use of language in that larger shift, not simply in the affordances for traditional curriculum delivery that the tools of the moment might bring.
    • anonymous
       
      Teachers need to think about goals & practices but students should also be thinking about their goals and how they learn and process information in the classroom! 
    • djarends
       
      Agree! 
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I agree, but the skills to do so need to be there first.
  • Personalized’ learning is something that we do to kids; ‘personal’ learning is something they do for themselves.”[4]
    • anonymous
       
      This is the second reference I've seen for this quote - should we then be gearing students towards a more "personal" learning concept?  
    • kbolinger
       
      I was thinking the same thing. It looks like the actual definition of Personalized Learning is widely debated. It would be nice if there was one term that, when spoken by educators, we would all be on the same page as to what it refers to. Either way, and no matter what it is called, the outcome that we are looking for should be the same - learner-centered schools that give students complete voice and choice.
  • A personalized environment gives students the freedom to follow a meaningful line of inquiry, while building the skills to connect, synthesize and analyze information into original productions.
    • djarends
       
      I like how this is worded. Students have freedom and choice. The task / learning is meaningful. Many high school students become frustrated because they do not see a reason for doing something. They learn skills that goes beyond just memorizing materials. They have to synthesize and analyze the information. Well worded.
  • lend themselves well to the computerized, modular and often very standardized system of “personalization” many ed-tech companies are offering.
    • djarends
       
      I become frustrated when I hear about this programs or are being pushed by administrators. I know they work for some students, but even those students need some guidance. I feel learning is more than just reading and completing material on the computer. It is interacting with people. The business world wants students that graduate with people skills (communication, cooperation, collaboration, etc.). Will this happen in a ed-tech "personalization" program only? 
  • It’s a dramatic shift that requires new literacies to navigate all that access and, importantly, new dispositions to take advantage of it for learning.
    • djarends
       
      "Ah, ha": As a person who has been teaching for a while and one who did not even know what a computer was until having to take a course at college for education, this rang true for me. It is a literacies that has to be learned by the older generation. My students are so immersed in this technology literacy. They navigate the web very quickly. They do not usually have the fear of the web which needs to be taught. Most of my students just laugh at me when I ask for help but do it willingly and are great teachers. I have learned a lot from them and appreciate their technology literacy skills.
  • “personal” learning is something they do for themselves
    • djarends
       
      I had not considered the differences before. I like that the students do it for themselves. I think they are more willing to learn when they have a purpose and the learning is much deeper. 
  • But if the point is to help kids understand ideas from the inside out and answer their own questions about the world, then what they’re doing is already personal (and varied).
    • djarends
       
      Facts are nothing without the understanding. What do the students THINK about their learning. The five Ws. Students become frustrated at me when I ask my favorite questions "How" or "Why" do you think that. It is hard to express our thinking. It is easy to spit out facts. 
  • because of the larger preoccupation with data data data data data.
    • djarends
       
      IEPs!
  • in the best student-centered, project-based education, kids spend much of their time learning with and from one another. Thus, while making sense of ideas is surely personal, it is not exclusively individual because it involves collaboration and takes place in a community.
    • djarends
       
      I am glad this was added. I worry about not having students that can work well with other. 
  • Dozens of teachers agreed that a truly personalized learning experience requires student choice, is individualized, meaningful and resource rich. This kind of learning allows students to work at their own pace and level, meets the individual needs of students, and perhaps most importantly, is not a one-size fits all model.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      When discussing the merits and challenges of personalized learning, it's alarming to me that technology was absent from the converstations when most of what I read includes the use of technology.
  • many school district leaders require public school educators to teach a specific curriculum that will be evaluated on standardized tests, while at the same time telling teachers to be innovative and creative within their classrooms. When that happens, the structures around the classroom leave little room for the kind of authentic, whole-child personalization many teachers dream of offering.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I like that conversations are getting serious about personalized learning, but how do we get school districts on board when training, planning, technology, etc., are driven by time and funding?
  • In a world where we can explore almost every interest or passion in depth on our own or with others, it’s crucially more important to have the dispositions and the skills to create our own educational opportunities, not be trained to wait for opportunities that someone else has selected for delivery.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Comes down to training. Not all students have the skills to create their own personal learning.
    • albertscarr
       
      I remember in 4th grade when my teacher got mad at me when I couldn't finish my math paper "on time." It would have been so much easier to go at my own pace!
  • She cautions educators who may be excited about the progressive educational implications for “personalized learning” to make sure everyone they work with is on the same page about what that phrase means.
    • albertscarr
       
      In reading these articles there does seem to be a lot of individual definitions of "personalization." However on the flip side it is personalized, so everyone is going to have their own definition.
  • Personalization promises better student achievement and, I believe, a more effective delivery method than any one teacher with 25 or 30 students in a classroom can compete with. It’s a no-brainer, right?
    • albertscarr
       
      With a class that size its hard to see any growth of any student with traditional methods. Personalization would help the teacher keep tack of each child's progress
  • The main objective is just to raise test scores
    • albertscarr
       
      Then we need to rethink the way we test!
    • bkoller86
       
      I agree test scores carry to much weight, but they aren't going away anytime soon. To many people in powerful places want to know where their money is going. 
  • it is clear that all children don’t learn the same way and personalization seems to honor those differences
    • kbolinger
       
      I agree. Personalization seems to be an almost perfect answer to addressing all of the different needs, learning styles, and achievement levels in our classrooms today. I wonder if this approach will become the norm for schools, and, if so, how long will it take for schools to completely adopt this model.
    • bkoller86
       
      I also agree. In a time we look at test score more and more it is increasingly more important to move every student forward. Not all children learn the same way; we can't expect them to show growth if we don't personalize the learning.
  • Personalization is often used in the ed-tech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace
    • kbolinger
       
      I feel much more knowledgeable about Personalized Learning today than I did a week ago. If someone would have asked me then if an adaptive learning or a computerized program that is tailored to a student's level and progresses them at their own pace is personalized learning, I surely would have said, "Yes!" I have now come to realize that there are many Personalized Learning components that are missing with just an adaptive learning program. Where is the student choice or goal setting? What if a computer is not that student's preferred learning method?
  • The only choice a student gets is what box to check on the screen and how quickly to move through the exercises
    • kkoller
       
      Teachers often use websites that will modify lessons to the student to push them ahead of their peers. I am just as guilty of this because I will often have students who are high in math, and have no one to put them with, so I use a website to help them progress. They make progress because it is personalized to them, but it doesn't tap into their interest and learning style. 
  • For many educators that’s not the true meaning of “personalized learning.” “That has nothing to do with the person sitting in front of you,” Laufenberg said. “It meets the needs of an individual in a very standardized way, but it doesn’t take into account who that kid is.
    • kkoller
       
      I feel teachers turn to technology because that is the quick fix to getting student learning to be ore personalized. We struggle to get enough staff, and numbers keep increasing in classrooms. How are teachers suppose to be creative and innovative when they can't get help in the room? 
  • Our kids (and we ourselves) are suddenly walking around with access to the sum of human knowledge in our pockets and connections to literally millions of potential teachers.
    • kkoller
       
      It is a great thing that we have such incredible access to information and others in our profession. It allows us to make connections, and reach out in education to see how other districts are getting it done. However, we as educators need to teach our students that while the access is wonderful, we need be careful of what we read. Students need to be taught the literacies of technology, and how to be critical of information found. 
  • others
  • opportunities
ksteingr

Iowa Core Literacy - k-12literacywithdok.pdf - 1 views

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    Iowa Core Social Studies Literacy Standards - pages 75 and following. The What.
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    Iowa Core Social Studies Literacy Standards - pages 75 and following. The How
cwhitebotello

Literacy for Children with Combined Vision and Hearing Loss - 0 views

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    Literacy checklist deafblind
Marcia Jensen

Smarter Balanced Assessments | Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium - 1 views

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    The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium is developing a system of valid, reliable, and fair next-generation assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English language arts/literacy (ELA/literacy) and mathematics for grades 3-8 and 11. The system-which includes both summative and interim assessments for accountability purposes and optional interim assessments for instructional use-will use computer adaptive testing technologies to the greatest extent possible to provide meaningful feedback and actionable data that teachers and other educators can use to help students succeed.
Deb Henkes

Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum for Grades 9-12 | Common Sense Media - 0 views

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    Common Sense Media  just added 12 Digital Citizenship lessons for high school students. View units on:Dealing with digital harassment and online dramaProtecting their reputation in a digital worldExploring their identitySourcing content responsiblyAnd more! As always, these lessons are completely FREE. Check back in September for high school lessons in the Safety and Security and Research and Information Literacy strands.
Mary Overholtzer

ollie1: Iowa Online Course Standards - 2 views

  • (K-12) • Information literacy and communication skills are incorporated and taught as an integral part of the curriculum.
    • Mary Trent
       
      Communication is key in online classes. I know I have been lost a time or two. I like checklists of requirements for the course.
    • anonymous
       
      Information literacy becomes even more important as more resources are available for our students. They need the tools to be able to filter through all the information out there and search out what is best. Middle school kids seem very willing to believe it if they saw it on the internet.
    • mhauser
       
      I'm 57 years old. My dad, who had an eighth grade education and would be in his 90s were he still alive used to tell us, "Don't believe everything you hear." He would also say, "Don't believe everything you read." My dad was wise. We need to be skeptics. Everyone needs to ask the questions, Who is sharing this information? Why should I believe them? What is their purpose? How old is this information? Can I understand the context in which it's offered? I'm a teacher librarian. I've been working on this for 16 years and love that information literacy is in these standards.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Communication is the hardest thing I do as a wife, mother, teacher, and friend. When I think I am communicating well, it's obvious that others are not!!!! HA! The hardest job I will every do is communicating.
  • • The course design provides opportunities for appropriate instructor-student interaction, including timely and frequent feedback about student progress based on the learning targets.
    • Mary Trent
       
      It's important to encourage students to feel comfortable to ask questions especially when they are lost. Quick, easy, multiple ways to contact the instructor are important.
    • Julia Schreckengast
       
      I would agree so many students are too afraid to ask questions in front of a class. They are just satisfied with not knowing rather than risking embarassment.
    • Laura Eklund
       
      I am involved in a grant program that is about blending the online teaching with face-to-face teaching, which will make the instructor-student interaction easier.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      Obviously this is important, but also challenging when you see as many as 150 students per day. It makes things like clickers and online communicaiton that much more important.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      Technology has made instructor-student interaction easier, while also making it difficult for students to not become involved. Students quickly see that they are accountable and instructors can track their participation.
    • Kevin Kemp
       
      Students and instructors both need feedback in order to achieve.  Progress can only be achieved with an ongoing, positive conversation
  • All resources and materials used in the course are appropriately cited and obey copyright and fair use.
    • crjessen44
       
      This is something I would like to know more about in the on-line world. I'm not sure on certain issues relating to this and would like to be more clear on my understanding.
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      I would also like information, especially about fair use!
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      This is one of the greatest concerns I have in planning an online course. I did find a section in the orientation materials for this course that addressed it. It is called "Copyright BriefNotes" and is available from the AEA. I can't tell you exactly where I found it; explored way too many links to be able to retrace my steps and the printout doesn't have a web address. It was a pdf file on a link.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      It is critical that we model appropriate citing, observance of copyright, and fair use for our students. My middle schoolers have difficulty grasping both the significance and the proper methods of these concepts.
    • Jessica White
       
      This is one of the most important details! Yes, middle school students struggle with citing. It is only going to be more important as more and more online resources are available.
    • Deb Ritchie
       
      I'm pretty clear on rights for print materials, but less sure when the item in question is a graphic, picture, etc. Does it make a difference that our course is only available to students in our classroom and not going out to the world wide web?
  • ...27 more annotations...
  • Sufficient learning resources and materials to increase student success are available to students
    • crjessen44
       
      This is where I think Moodle or other similar tools will have an advantage. I like that I will be able to group all relevant resources together for students. I have a lot of resources right now but they are all scattered..
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I definitely agree with you about these online tools making resources more available. Like you, I have many resources in many locations. I am gradually moving the resources to my Moodle course pages and plan to expand this to include Diigo. Grouping the resources will provide students with a consistent location while working and provide me with a better method for keeping web pages current.
  • Ongoing and frequent assessments
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      Formative assessments?
    • anonymous
       
      Good question - Would this be a good spot for using some of the online quiz tools that we saw on the Cool Tools website? Is it easier or harder to complete formative assessments in an online setting?
  • Instructions to students on how to meet the learning objectives are adequate and stated clearly.
    • rcordes1961
       
      AS Stiggens said many years ago, students need to know the target before attempting to hit the target. Trying to hit a moving target is frustrating and difficult for everyone!
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      How true! It is important that the students clearly know what is expected of them.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      My nine-year old even undertands this! He recently commented, "This assignment would be so much easier if (the teacher) had given us a rubric."
    • Kevin Kemp
       
      If our students don't know what to expect, what are we doing?  Students need and deserve to know what they are responsible to know.
    • mhauser
       
      I need to get better about making clear daily objectives. That's new to me, but my faculties have their learning goals posted on their walls each day. It's great for everybody. Kathy, I love what your son said. Kevin, you are right on the money!
    • Victoria Guilliatt
       
      I put my lesson objectives on the board when I teach my elementary library classes, it makes it easier for the students to know what I expect.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      What's amazing to me is when I have a student say, "Give me a rubric, and I can easily get an A with less effort." This scares me....to me it's a way of putting forth mediocre work by "beating" the system. Tha'ts why every rubric I build has a perception component of quality when comparing project/discussions/etc with peers.
  • Assessment strategies and tools, such as "self-check" or practice assignments, make the student continuously aware of his/her progress in class and mastery of the content beyond letter grades.
    • Julia Schreckengast
       
      I am going to try to use next year with my CoPi blended classroom.
    • Amy Kemp
       
      I hope to create some practice problems or a quiz using Softchalk.  I have never created anything myself for them to do online.
  • The course instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning
    • Laura Eklund
       
      This is a great place for the cool tools for school, but there are so many out there I don't know where to begin. Also, it seems like everytime I find a tool that engages students a new and better tool comes out and I have relearn everything about that tool.
  • The course instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning
    • Bob Pauk
       
      Students today live in a different world than the one most of us in this class experienced when we were young. Sitting for 45 minutes with nothing more than an overhead projector or chalkboard to look at and nothing more than a teachers voice to hear is just completely out of touch with the way students experience things outside of the classroom. As educators we need to keep that in mind or we really will have kids bored to death.
    • Joleen Louwsma
       
      Students are multitaskers and grow bored when not challenged. Active and interactive learning is one way to keep them engaged. I also feel that as teachers we need to change our " tools" and raise the bar for learning.
    • mhauser
       
      In most classes, I think we have about 10 minutes to direct students toward the learning that we hope will happen that day. Then we have to let them get started on their learning and coach them as needed for the rest of the class. If there is confusion or a common thread shows up during the class time, the coach/facilitator/teacher might stop the student work to explain, or to have a student explain the issue, but otherwise, the focus is definitely not on the teacher. It's not about us. ;-)
  • • Academic integrity and netiquette (Internet etiquette) expectations regarding lesson activities, discussions, e-mail communications and plagiarism are clearly stated
    • Matt Tracy
       
      This, I believe, is more and more important because our students really struggle with understanding that once something is on the web, it's out there for good. They also struggle with understanding just the basics of appropriateness.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Do you think that in many cases students do know what is appropriate and what is not? I think that students sometimes push the limits to see if the instructor cares enough to hold them accountable.
  • The course goals and objectives are measurable and clearly state what the participants will know or be able to do at the end of the course
    • Bob Pauk
       
      This one is so simple, yet doing this effectively is probably on of the most important things an instructor can do to avoid problems down the road.
    • rcordes1961
       
      I agree, Bob. I think sometimes we believe students are suppose to be mind readers when it comes to what they will learn or be able to do.
    • Jason Gomez
       
      My school went to putting the learning target on the board everyday. I think it was good, but should be incorporated with a "ticket out the door" activity.
  • Instruction provides students with multiple learning paths to master the content, addressing individual student needs, learning styles and preferences
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I really love the idea that we can tailor courses to meet the needs of individual students. I would like to explore ways to have various paths leading to mastery. Once a student has mastered a concept, he or she can move on to the next concept. A student who needs more practice could be redirected to more learning activities on the same concept. One size does not fit all.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      As I learn more about online learning and using Moodle, I am excited about the possibilities for differentiation. I see this as one of the greatest strengths of the format.
    • Bev Berns
       
      I love the idea of giving students ownership in their learning!
  • Technologies are chosen that are accessible to students
    • rcordes1961
       
      We need to keep in mind not all students have internet access at home. Online learning cannot be another way of separating the haves from the have nots.
    • Tresa Zaragoza
       
      This is the one that worries me the most. Between having enough computers and having them work when we need them.
  • A clear, complete course overview and syllabus are included in the course
    • Joleen Louwsma
       
      This is an important factor in making a successful class. What I think is clear and concise may be confusing to my students. Writing the syllabus, the course overview, expectations, and lesson instructions will be an ongoing process.
  • Instructions make clear how to get started and where to find various course components
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      As students in this course, many of us understand that it may be easy to be overwhelmed when starting out in online learning. We help our students with simple and clear guidance.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      As time goes on, what we consider to be so difficult, becomes easier as time goes on. We must note that while we teach online learners---and naturally, while they teach us too.
  • The requirements for student work, including student interaction, are clearly articulated.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Limited experiences teaching online have taught me that the quality of student interaction rises significantly when there are rubrics that spell out expectations for student posts. Otherwise, students easily slip into the language and style of non-academic online social interactions.
  • The course provider offers the course teacher, school coordinator assistance with technical support and course management. .
    • April Tidwell
       
      I feel this is so important. One of my biggest concerns about going 1:1 next year is the lack of tech support. I haven't seen any plan to increase the tech department, and I often have to wait days to get answers currently from the help desk. Students get extremely frustrated when technology doesn't work especially if there is no one there to help them.
  • The course provides opportunities for appropriate student interaction with the content to foster mastery and application of the material.
    • Heather Gould
       
      Rigor and Relevance is the Characteristic of Effective Instruction that comes to mind as I read this. Good instruction is good instruction, regardless of the teaching modality. In a student-centered environment, as this suggests, students are encouraged to collaborate with others as they take their new knowledge and apply it.
    • Steven Petersen
       
      This is critical. Without face-to-face interaction there has to be a method put in place for frequent contact by the teacher. Students always have questions and an inability to address those questions will lead to frustration.
  • The course accommodates multiple school calendars; e.g., block, 4X4 and traditional schedules
    • Steven Petersen
       
      Why should this matter. Unless it is a blended class the confines of the school schedule should be immaterial.
  • The course provides opportunities for appropriate instructor-student and student-student interaction to foster mastery and application of the material and a plan for monitoring that interaction.
    • hollysoby
       
      This is one I'm excited about - I'm hoping by mixing online with face to face learning I can have more interaction with quiet students - though I know from taking online classes it can be easy to just do enough to get by if there aren't a lot of opportunities to interact.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      I am hoping that is portion of the "face to face" is built in to help accomodate learning for students who are having trouble mastering the content. My worse fear of online learning is making the material move too quickly for students to keep up, making them frustrated and not positive learners.
  • The course structure includes a wide variety of assessment procedures to assess students’ mastery of content.
    • hollysoby
       
      This is something I feel like I need to be careful about - I think it's easy to get so excited about new ideas I throw a lot of projects at students at once - I need to think really hard about what I want to assess them on.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      Glad it isn't just me, I find that I also get pumped about something, throw it out to the students to "try" and then I realize at the end that I had no way to measure whether it was really effective or not.
  • • Grading policy and practices are easy to understand.
  • 21st century skills in the course, including: using 21st century skills in the core subjects, 21st century content, learning and thinking skills, ICT literacy, self-directed learning, global awareness
    • Tim Hadley
       
      Courses being online in and of themselves are 21st Century learning skills. However, I believe, online instruction should include more than just being posted on the internet. It should push students to be self-directed and global learners. Fulfilling this standard will take work, but I believe it is one of the most important goals of learning.
  • Hardware, web browser and software requirements, as well as prerequisite technology skills are specified.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      This is something I hadn't really thought about, but it makes sense. If students can't access your course from the beginning it would make it hard to impossible to be able to complete it.
  • Specific and descriptive criteria, including rubrics, are provided for the evaluation of students’ work and participation.
    • Jessica White
       
      This is always important to me as a teacher. Students must know how they are graded before the assignment/project is started. This would be the same with online learning.
  • The course provides opportunities for students to engage in higher-order thinking, critical-reasoning activities and thinking in increasingly complex ways
    • Deb Ritchie
       
      This is the standard that I'm most interested in. How do we make sure students are not doing the same old things only now with a computer? We need to keep the bar up there for higher-order thinking skills and critical reasoning. I'm hoing to gather ideas from class to help me do this.
  • instructional materials are aligned with the content
    • Victoria Guilliatt
       
      This is very important when I teach the elementary students in the library because it is very easy for them to become lost in the lesson
  • The course content and assignments are aligned with state’s content standards or nationally accepted content standards
    • Jason Gomez
       
      This always worries me; is the content of my class the same as the state's content? My district has gone to content mapping which makes it very easy to know that we are following state standards
Chad Jilek

online1: Iowa Online Course Standards - 10 views

    • ksteingr
       
      What information do we have about this group? Looks like the research is very new - http://www.inacol.org/research/reports.php Makes it sound like deep undercover reporting, but I was just curious. I had never heard of INACOL. :-)
    • Evan Abbey
       
      iNACOL was originally NACOL (they went "international" in 2008). They have been around about 8 years now, and are recognized as the national leader in organizations build around quality online learning. They are analogous to an ASCD. In Iowa, Gwen Nagel from Iowa Learning Online is a member and contributor, as is Marcel Kielkucki, director of Kirkwood Community College's High School Distance Learning Program. Marcel and Gwen presented last November at iNACOL's conference on the current setup of online learning in Iowa. You are going to find that most research in online learning is extremely new. The reseach du jour is comparing online to F2F, in which case there are many (many!) studies that have come out. None of the studies are older than 2006, and most have come in the last 18 months.
  • The course instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning. • Instruction provides students with multiple learning paths to master the content, addressing individual student needs, learning styles and preferences.
    • Janet Kinman
       
      Engagement at a level you would expect in a traditional classroom is key. Online instruction has to be differentiated, and not a "dump" of information.
    • Phyllis Anderson
       
      Online instruction might more readily provide an environment in which students can take different paths for learning.I am thinking it might be easier to incorporate UDL (Universal Design for Learning) in this environment.
  • The course makes maximum appropriate use of online tools outside of the CMS (including email, web 2.0, chat, videoconferencing, and whiteboard) to enhance learning
    • Pam Buysman
       
      Moodle certainly has a number of built in tools for the course developer to to use. There is an internal blog and wiki available, but perhaps, wikis and blogs that are available outside of Moodle will better serve the needs of the participants. We need to choose what is most appropriate to meet the objectives of our course. What will best enhance the learning experience for our students? In order to do that of course, we'll need to have an awareness and also a certain amount of expertise to have students utilize these tools.
    • Drinda Williams
       
      I agree--we need a certain amount of expertise. It's so discouraging to participants when the tools we're trying to use don't work as expected.
    • linda vann
       
      Just as in a face-to-face classroom, there are techniques for engaging learning. Those techniques need to be mastered in order to be effective. The same with online tools - they must be mastered and understood in order to effective. The great news with any learning is that it is quite collaborative - students learn from teachers as much as teachers learn from students. I think this is certainly true in the online environment.
    • Corrine Breitsprecker
       
      The added challenge is that there are new tools constantly available. Keeping up on the new tools and their uses worries me!
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  • Proposed Online Course Standards
    • Drinda Williams
       
      Evan, are these the standards that will be used to vet proposed courses for the statewide moodle through Heartland? At AEA 267 we were discussing how course proposals would be evaluated and approved.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Yes and no. The standards will be used for instructional designers/instructors as they build courses, and by evaluators as they review courses. But they are not formally part of the course proposal process.
  • STUDENT ASSESSMENT
    • Drinda Williams
       
      This is one that I'm finding somewhat challenging. If I am asking teachers to implement, how do I provide sufficient feedback? Reading a lesson plan is not the same as seeing them implement. I'm wondering if AEA consultants around the state might cooperate in some observations.
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      Here's an idea: digital video of the teacher in the classroom that could be submitted/uploaded to the course site (i.e. the ever-popular Flip video). Feedback could be given by using an audio overlay of the video (almost like the audio commentary track on a DVD) or posting comments to a forum (if it was group feedback).
    • linda vann
       
      I have actually used that technique as a student in a online course. We (class members) were able to provide feedback to each other on the submitted videos. We posted comments to a discussion board, we did not have the technology at that time to use an audio overlay. It was very effective and quite entertaining to get lots of different perspectives on our experiences.
    • Valerie Jergens
       
      Linda- Were you given a rubric or other reference to compare other students' work against? I wonder if without something like that, if students would give the "nice job" and "great" feedback instead of something more constructive and meaningful. How do you guard against that?
  • students to engage in higher-order thinking, critical-reasoning activities and thinking in increasingly complex ways.
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      In science, we are always looking for ways to engage students in higher-order thinking skills. I'm sure it provides different challenges when you are teaching online.
    • Steve Bartlett
       
      I would agree that engagement with online is a challenge when I compare it to engagement in an inquiry based lesson where there is active interaction between students working with hands on materials.
  • clear, complete course overview and syllabus
    • Peggy Christensen
       
      Because you are not face-to-face (or if you are teaching a blended/hybrid course and have limited face-to-face interaction), you need to make sure your course overview and syllabus are clear and complete.
    • Valerie Jergens
       
      Right, Peggy. I think in the classroom I have relied on students' questions as a way to help me describe what I am thinking/asking for. In an online environment, this doesn't work. It would be a lot more pressure for me as the teacher.
  • timely and frequent feedback about student progress based on the learning targets.
    • Eldon Bird
       
      How important is this! Probably even more important today when students are accustomed to instant feedback whenever they access technology.
    • Steve Bartlett
       
      Feedback along the way is so important especially when one is not sure they are on the right path to meeting a targeted goal
    • Kelsey Bova
       
      It is also important to not only give instant feedback along the way, but MEANINGFUL feedback. Students don't get anything out of a "good job!" or "nicely done!" I always have to put myself in the students' shoes and think of what meaningful feedback I would like and make it specific towards that individual student and his/her work.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      I agree, Kelsey, it is important to give meaningful feedback. It is so difficult to keep up with students when the numbers reach 175-180, as they are beginning to in my district.
  • (CP) • The course provider offers the course teacher, school coordinator assistance with technical support and course management.
    • Erica Larson
       
      I am curious who provides will provide this support in future OLLIE courses?
  • 21st century skills
    • James Webb
       
      21st Century Skills has become something of a hollow buzz word to me, I'm afraid. Is it just a matter of aligning traditional thinking with new technology? Or is there something "new" here that I'm missing? And how much direction do you think students need with technology itself? How much of this in intuitive with them?
    • Phyllis Anderson
       
      Our 21st C. Iowa Core Skills include more than technology skills. They also include concepts and skills in civic literacy, health literacy, employability, and financial literacy. Do the additional areas make 21st. C Skills seem less hollow?
    • James Webb
       
      I suppose. I get the concept, and I want to believe, but I feel like these are things they've always needed to know. Are we just re-naming what we're already doing?
    • Alan Junck
       
      And how much will these change in the next 10 years? It seems like we need to teach more about being flexible in regards to technology.
  • instructor-student and student-student interaction to foster mastery and application of the material and a plan for monitoring that interaction.
    • linda vann
       
      The need for formative assessment continues to be vital in the online environment so mastery can be monitored and adjustments made when mastery is being challenged. As an online learner, it is important for me to know in advance what supports are available when I need them.
  • Ongoing and frequent assessments are conducted to verify each student’s readiness for the next lesson.
    • linda vann
       
      It seems that the ongoing and frequent assessment process is critical and I believe actually a bit easier in the online environment. The ease comes from the direct nature of the interaction between instructor-student and student-student interactions. Sometimes in a crowded F2F classroom, this can be more challenging.
    • Christopher Soldat
       
      In a classroom setting, formative assessment would inform the classroom teachers thinking about instruction for the next part of the unit. How will that look in an online asynchronous learning environment?
  • The course is organized into units and lessons.
    • Jeny Schoenhard
       
      This stands out for me because I feel that sometimes as educators we get excited about a new teaching tool or method and it is so important to remember to provide manageable portions for our students so that they are not overwhelmed and have the ability to completely understand an area of learning.
  • Assessment strategies and tools, such as "self-check" or practice assignments, make the student continuously aware of his/her progress in class and mastery of the content beyond letter grades.
    • Jeny Schoenhard
       
      What a fantastic benefit to students! Self Check and practice assignments are a wonderful tool to use so that student know when they are on the right track.
  • The course instructions articulate or link to a clear description of the technical support offered.
    • Corrine Breitsprecker
       
      This is really important! My work has been with adult learners rather than school-age students, and I think adults are more tentative and less comfortable just "trying things out" with technology that is new to them. Whether adult or school-age, learners need to know that there is technical support available when needed and how to get that help.
  • Instructions to students on how to meet the learning objectives are adequate and stated clearly.
    • Chad Jilek
       
      I have taken online courses where these weren't clear and those courses were not fun. When someone is not there to answer all your questions the student needs to have the expectations layed out with a good amount of detail.
  • The course is easy and logical to navigate, including self-describing links
    • Chad Jilek
       
      Most students that take an online course will have no problem nagivating through it but there will be times when it is a students first time with online learning or have to take the course online out of necessity and if the technology aspect of the learning is difficult the learning outcomes probably won't be very good.
  •  
    This is a key piece to online instruction. If you just dump all your materials online, this is not effective online teaching.
  •  
    "instructor-student and student-student interaction to foster mastery and application of the material and a plan for monitoring that interaction. "
  •  
    "instructor-student and student-student interaction to foster mastery and application of the material and a plan for monitoring that interaction. "
Heather Whitman

ollie-afe-2018: Educational Leadership: The Quest for Quality--article - 14 views

  • overflow of testing
    • nickol11
       
      I couldn't agree more with this statement. I feel like every other week we are testing our students through MAP, Iowa Assessments, etc. I am also from a TAP school so we are doing Pre/Post/Strategy testing in our rooms, as well.
    • stephlindmark
       
      I would love to learn more about a TAP school as that is a new term to me. I would agree with this statement too about doing testing overload.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      This is still a very true statement eight years after this article is written! The movement/shift is to move to more project based learning etc. but our testing systems have yet to make any changes. Very frustrating for teachers and students.
    • dykstras
       
      Progress monitoring for intervention students comes to mind when I read this. These kids generally struggle enough as it is, so rather than use instructional time to help them learn more, we test tehm instead.
    • staudtt
       
      This is one of my biggest pet peeves with education today. We get kids for only so long and so much of it is sucked away by standardized testing.
    • jwalt15
       
      I also agree with this statement and others comments. I wish we could find a good balance of testing and actual hands-on learning. Testing is stressful on everyone and takes the fun out of learning.
  • The four categories of learning targets are
    • nickol11
       
      This is the main goal of our current district. I find this information to be really important as there are so many items and content areas being assessed. I feel it is important to look and asses in all of these areas for our students to really make sure they are learning the items we are giving them.
  • Are results communicated in time to inform the intended decisions?
    • nickol11
       
      I feel that this is an essential part of teaching in addition to that of learning targets. Students must know where they are going before they start. They need a glimpse of what may be expected of them and possibly what not to do, as well.
  • ...63 more annotations...
  • performance assessment and personal communication,
    • nickol11
       
      I agree that we should see more performance based assessments with much for feedback for students. As we know each student is different this type of assessment create and opportunity for a student to create something to showcase their learning. Many times they will become more engaged and will retain much more information in the long gun. I am curious if some teachers stray away from these assessments?
    • brarykat
       
      You ask a very good question.  I was trained in project-based learning.  Students can benefit so much from it but it can be overwhelming for the teacher without training.  I would guess many teachers shy away from performance based assessments for the same reason.  Putting forth more time in feedback to students could be a deterrent also. Especially in middle school or high school due to the number of students.  Time for grading and to write feedback for performance based assessments would be necessary to do it with fidelity.
  • grouping the assessments into levels
    • nickol11
       
      I am grateful to be apart of a district that recognizes this need and is providing us time to build our assessment plans while we are building our learning targets.
  • Who will use the results to inform what decisions?
    • jhazelton11
       
      I think this is an important question. Who are the results for? The teacher? The student? The parent? Administrators? Legislators? I'm not sure the right answer, but it's an important question to consider.
    • stephlindmark
       
      I feel that everyone uses that results differently too to meet their needs and can construe them to fit their agenda.
    • krcouch
       
      Totally agree with this! Who actually sees the results and how are they using it? Every teacher uses it differently for sure. And they need to be used to best benefit the student.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Many districts are moving to standard based grading. After more explanations and understanding to students, families, community, staff, and legislators occurs, I think this will help. The focus on the standard and after breaking it down many ways and with much thought, the results are shared. I agree that people can construe the results to look better or gain something, but we have to focus on who matters. It is for the students and those doing the teaching to really make decisions where to go next. Let the data talk.
  • Creating a plan like this for each assessment helps assessors sync what they taught with what they're assessing
    • jhazelton11
       
      Having the end in mind is important in teaching, because otherwise we aren't teaching what we are assessing, which ultimately makes our assessments useless.
  • descriptive feedback linked to the targets of instruction and arising from the assessment items or rubrics communicates to students in ways that enable them to immediately take action, thereby promoting further learning.
    • jhazelton11
       
      This is time-consuming... every teacher knows this is helpful, but we don't always have the time to provide the immediate feedback. Aghhhh...
    • brarykat
       
      Right… and we are now a society with expectation of immediate feedback on many aspects of life that waiting can cause great frustration.  Technology has provided many ways for teachers to provide immediate feedback, but without trainings many educators don't have knowledge of support tools.
    • blockerl
       
      I really like using Google Docs in my classroom to provide immediate feedback to students, especially when typing an essay. For example, this week I had students "finish" their memoirs much faster than their peers. With the use of Google Docs, I was able to provide them with immediate feedback about what they can do to improve their paper. Immediate feedback is hard, but I try to get papers back with clear feedback to my students as quickly as possible.
  • self-assess and set goals.
    • jhazelton11
       
      I'm trying to understand this better as I'm creating an online class for students to take. I'm trying to understand how students can take some ownership of their assessment and learning, but also struggling a bit to wrap my mind around it.
    • Jen Van Fleet
       
      There is a huge effect size for student goal setting. So essentially, huge ROI if students understand what is the goal and where they are in relation to the goal and how they are going to move closer to the goal. So if you can create the opportunity for students to self asses, it will be time worth spent.
  • formative point of view
    • jhazelton11
       
      There's certainly more focus on formative assessment nowadays compared to years ago, where we did more summative.
    • srankin11
       
      Agree! It is important for teachers and students to have the feedback of knowing where they are instead of figuring it out after taking a summative assessment.
  • The assessor needs to have a clear picture of what achievement he or she intends to measure.
    • hansenn
       
      These targets should be the criteria on your rubric or the focus of your questions. It can be challenging to create questions that directly relate to the targets.
    • brarykat
       
      I agree.  Rubrics can help students and the teacher stay focused on the expected outcome.  I appreciate the suggestion that the teacher should use rubric verbiage in the feedback to the student.  Which also means the vocabulary in the rubric needs to be clear and understandable.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      I think rubrics are critical for assignments/projects. We are letting the students know what the expectations are for the assignment.
  • not
    • hansenn
       
      I once read that you were not suppose to use not in a selected response, but I still use them because it makes students compare and contrast the concepts.
    • dykstras
       
      I agree. It's not a trick question.
  • Students learn best when they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning.
    • hansenn
       
      I have been trying to have my students use a rubric to evaluate their own progress. If i have time to talk to the student and compare our scores and provide oral feedback it works better. Online meeting with the student might be more difficult.
    • stephlindmark
       
      I think when any human does self-reflection their is more meaning behind it and we carry those skills with us longer and they are personalized.
    • dykstras
       
      I tried to do this through Google Forms and share results with parents at conferences, hopefully to show correlation between what their kid thinks they understand versus what they demonstarte they understand. I have to admmit, it failed. Kids ranked themselves high almost everytime as if they thought it would affect their grade. it ended up having no impact on achievement. Perhaps I will try a different approach at a later time.
    • bbraack
       
      When a student takes responsibility for their own learning, then when they understand or meet the standard, then they know they have learned something and did it they feel good and have accomplished something.
  • ongoing information needs of teachers and students.
    • hansenn
       
      The needs of the school or teachers is to be able to grade the assessments. If standardized test are selected response and short answer because the results can be calculated quickly. They can measure some higher thinking skills, but most are not. Why do people place so much importance on the test.
    • stephlindmark
       
      Great question and observation!
  • We're betting that the instructional hours sacrificed to testing will return dividends in the form of better instructional decisions and improved high-stakes test scores.
    • Mike Radue
       
      I find this interesting. Authors are betting that giving up instructional time in favor of testing will pay off in terms of better decisions about students and what seems to be for some, the ultimate goal of improved standardized test scores. Assuming assessment structure and frequency is balanced as the paper outlines, that's a good bet.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      what is interesting is that most teachers are doing formal assessment throughout their teaching, using RTI (response to intervention) time etc.
    • dykstras
       
      See my comments on the 'overflow of testing' highlight. Guess I should have read a little further. This is like betting on giving up one hour of instructional time every Wednesday for professional development will increase student achievement.
    • carlarwall
       
      We also need to find a balance of instruction and assessment. How can we expect students to perform well on assessments when there is little or no time for instruction on the concepts being assessed because of all the testing.
    • blockerl
       
      I'm interested to know what they are basing this on. So, if I test my students more, they will learn more?
  • Figure 2 clarifies which assessment methods are most likely to produce accurate results for different learning targets.
    • Mike Radue
       
      This is an excellent visual to help assessors think carefully about the learning target and in turn selecting a proper assessment method. It even has some flexibility supporting a multiple measures type of approach. Accuracy is important and this matrix can help serve that goal.
    • brarykat
       
      Well said Mike.  I think this would be a helpful document for teachers to keep in a ready reference file.  I hadn't considered some of the reasons why certain assessments would not be a good match with the learning targets. The explanations whether good matches or not are quite helpful.
    • blockerl
       
      I, too, really like this chart. It is a nice, simple thing for teachers to use when they are in their teams coming up with Common Formative Assessments.
    • staudtt
       
      As eveyone has stated, this chart really does a good job of breaking down quality ways to look at learning targets. It keeps it simple yet you get some quality information.
  • Will the users of the results understand them and see the connection to learning?
    • Mike Radue
       
      Assessment, as a science, can be tough to comprehend for professional educators, let alone a 8 year old, a parent, a school board member or some guy reading an article in the Des Moines Register. Ask ten people to explain validity and reliability and you might be surprised at the results. What I like about the concept in this article is that it emphasizes the "context" of the assessment. Do users of results truly understand what they are looking at and most importantly connect to a big picture and take the next step? Communication is important but so is education and review of assessment principles for all users of results to understand.
    • jwalt15
       
      Great observation Mike! You summed up this article perfectly. All of the focus and discussion on assessments doesn't do any good if the people involved aren't truly understanding the information that is being shared with them. People can't comprehend next steps if they don't understand the information in the first place.
  • Educators are more likely to attend to issues of quality and serve the best interests of students when we build balanced systems, with assessment-literate users.
    • Mike Radue
       
      Great conclusion and mission. After reading this, I have definitely been challenged to take a closer look at how I view assessment, its purpose and what to do with the results. Seeking balance in the manner in which we conduct assessment and committing to improve assessment literacy for myself and others is a key take-away for me.
    • stephlindmark
       
      Seeking balance in assessment is something I gained from this article too. I will be looking at assessment differently.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      Agreed! Balance is the key to anything. We need to show the students that assessment is important in any form. It is how we grow not only academically, but personally.
  • results that point student and teacher clearly to next steps
    • brarykat
       
      Over the years I've observed increase in doing constructive lessons due to results of assessment. When I was new to this profession the assessment was the focus.  Now I see more emphasis on helping close gaps in learning located through assessments. However, time for assessments to be evaluated and locate those areas that need review or to reteach (possibly in a different method) is mandatory. Allocating the time needed for teachers to evaluate results should be a priority for administration.  
    • lisamsuya
       
      I agree. I think following the PLC framework helps teachers collaborate about the learning needs based on assessments.
    • Jen Van Fleet
       
      Hi Lisa! I completely agree with adding stock to the PLC framework so that teachers have intentional and regular time to have these conversations when there is plenty of time to act up on results and adjust instruction.
  • Assessment quality and assessment balance
    • stephlindmark
       
      I believe we need both quality and balance. I believe we were on the right step with Smarter Balance when the decision was made to halt that process and put it on hold for various reasons.
    • lisamsuya
       
      I couldn't agree more. Smarter Balanced is the most standards based assessment available and instead of top quality for our kids and teachers, the legislature chose to spend less for lesser quality for our kids. You can see it's a hot topic for me.
  • basis of a single measure
    • stephlindmark
       
      This is a sad day when we as educators take one single measure and make life long decisions.
    • carlarwall
       
      I totally agree! Basing decisions on one assessment is like interviewing someone for a job and only asking one question. We need to look at multiple artifacts when making decisions that are best for students including any social/emotional needs of the student.
    • krcouch
       
      Agreed! a single measure should not dictate what our students know and how they learn. Students learn many different ways...visual, auditory. and test many different ways...
    • emmeyer
       
      So true! One test, or one event, should not define a student. That goes against us teaching our students to be life long learners and having a growth mindset.
  • including students
    • stephlindmark
       
      The learning targets and reason for the assessment needs to be first and foremost clear to the students. Teachers need to take the assessment before hand to assure it aligns with the teaching standards that they intended to be taught.
    • dykstras
       
      Our district has made a strong push to write all learning targets in student friendly language, often times utilizing "I can" statements
  • learning targets
    • stephlindmark
       
      These have to be clear and concise and match to the common core.
    • carlarwall
       
      Clear learning targets are not only key when assessing, but they are also important during instruction. With that being said, that does not mean just posting them in your room, but using them throughout instruction.
  • choices in the assessment methods
    • stephlindmark
       
      Using a choice of assessment methods is important to capture for all students their knowledge on a learning target.
  • noise distractions
    • stephlindmark
       
      I was in a classroom the other day and she had the radio playing in the background and it was a distraction for me. I was trying to work with a special ed student on a science assignment and has a hard time concentrating.
    • srankin11
       
      If a student focuses better with music, why wouldn't a teacher have that student use ear buds? There are many students that would be distracted by the music/radio and may not say anything to the teacher.
  • Feedback to students can use the language of the rubric
    • stephlindmark
       
      Using the same wording from the rubric is another way to enforce the students' learning and reinforce skills.
    • dykstras
       
      Again, I should continue to read before commenting. I just said the same thing in a previous post :-)
    • emmeyer
       
      I agree, using the same language helps to reinforce for students that this is important.
  • Ongoing classroom assessments serve both formative and summative purposes and meet students' as well as teachers' information needs.
    • stephlindmark
       
      The key here is formative and summative and ongoing assessments. We don't stop with one and move on we want all students to learn the prioritized standard to mastery.
  • The goal of a balanced assessment system is to ensure that all assessment users have access to the data they want when they need it, which in turn directly serves the effective use of multiple measures.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      This is critical! We need to have balance in our instruction and assessment. We don't want to be that teacher that practices "Death by assessment".
  • Effectively planning for the use of multiple measures means providing assessment balance throughout these three levels, meeting student, teacher, and district information needs. This is done using both formative and summative assessments, large-group and individual testing, assessing a range of relevant learning targets using a range of appropriate assessment methods.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      This is critical and just reaffirms that balance is the key. Teachers need to be adding/weaving the various assessments within their normal routine.
    • staudtt
       
      And the key/struggle at times is finding what type of assessment/s fits the learning target/s to maximize the time a teacher has.
  • he decision makers might be students and teachers at the classroom level; instructional leaders, learning teams, and teachers at the periodic level; or curriculum and instructional leaders and school and community leaders at the annual testing level.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      This is a critical piece! There has to be some guidance from the district level to school level to teacher level, but buy in really has to be at the teacher/student level. Another thought could be that it is driven from the bottom up instead of top down.
  • (selected-response, extended written response, performance assessment, and personal communication)
    • stephlindmark
       
      It is important to keep all four of these options within the assessment for students to show their knowledge.
  • Making decisions that affect individuals and groups of students
    • lisamsuya
       
      I have always disliked the notion of adults thinking a test score will determine a child's future, and then impacting that future by giving that child the message that their test scores are who they are.
    • jwalt15
       
      I agree with your dislike of the notion of adults thinking a test score will determine a child's future. I feel that puts too much pressure on student's when they are testing and increases their anxieties. Single test scores cannot accurately measure one's thinking and abilities. I wish that society would change their thinking and listen to educators who are actually in the classrooms.
  • organize the learning targets represented in the assessment into a written test plan that matches the learning targets represented in the curriculum.
    • lisamsuya
       
      This is difficult but important work. In my experience teachers are not well trained in creating assessments that are aligned in this way. I have attended some trainings in this, and as an instructional coach, I try to support quality assessment creation by teachers. However, in the long run, I think that it is better if schools adopt materials that include assessments that are aligned to common core and are already vetted by organizations such as EdReports to be of high quality. It saves times, and the models from these materials actual teach the teachers along the way of how to create tests aligned to learning targets
  • stable estimates of student achievement
    • trgriffin1
       
      A major challenge we are confronting at JHS is that assessments (and by that I really mean evaluations/grades) are 'dead'. They aren't about growth, they are entered as numerical grades into Infinite Campus. This has made 'assessment' a dirty word (like the overflow idea below).
    • Jen Van Fleet
       
      I know what you mean. This year with some SBAR transition work, the teachers did not have to enter the district end of term assessments for math (and maybe other content areas?), but the teachers were told they could still use the assessments. It was interesting to listen to conversations when teachers could actually assess and then just use the info to inform their instruction rather than just to perform a function in Campus.
    • dassom
       
      I love the word stable in this sentence. We have CTT that arent giving enough CFA's to catch kids before it's too late. We have the flipside though the some CTT's are giving almost to much assessment that the kids aren't getting a chance to struggle (which is not the correct tern). I think with practice teachers will get better at it, but it definately needs to be a quality good balance. Too much or too little can be harmful both ways.
  • Clear Purpose
    • trgriffin1
       
      Too often the purpose of the assessment is to see if a student knows the content or not at the end of a unit or chapter. This article would be good to share to change that idea.
    • tifinifog
       
      Exactly. We need to think about the final product or big idea of what we want them to know even before creating a test/assessment.
  • Sound Assessment Design
    • trgriffin1
       
      This is a major challenge! Teachers need support in learning about and reflecting on assessment design.
    • srankin11
       
      Agree! I believe teachers not only need the support but also the time. To write a sound assessment takes time. For many subjects, there may be quality assessments included with textbooks. For other classes, all assessments must be written by the teacher. This takes time to produce a quality assessment.
  • Student Involvement in the Assessment Process
    • trgriffin1
       
      This is a daunting idea when a teacher may teach 6 periods of the same content to 25 students at a time. Teachers need to see this as doable and students need to develop these skills.
  • selected-response formats, extended written response, performance assessment, and personal communication
    • dykstras
       
      Multiple assessment methods is and always has been best practice. Choosing only one style of question type can prohibit many learners from expressing their knowledge of the material. There are too many lerner styles in any given class to apply a one size fits all assessment.
  • teachers must provide the results in a way that helps students
    • dykstras
       
      This is where I think our work with rubrics shows students how to grow.
  • taking advantage of dependable data
    • dykstras
       
      It all boils down to this for me. What data do I have? Why do I have it? What am I going to do with it? How will it impact student achievement?
  • common assessments
    • leighbellville
       
      Common assessments are a focus now during our Professional Learning Communities (PLC) work. There have been concerns expressed by educators that students are asked to complete too many assessments now. However, I have also observed when additional assessments can allow students more flexibility in terms of movement based on individual growth. If a student is tested only once per year and this one piece of data is used to guide decisions throughout the year that would not be in the best interest of the student either.
    • dassom
       
      I know common assessments can be terrifying to teachers because of what it actually showing. The results are a reflection of how well your students did, but it is also a reflection of how well you did teaching the concepts. It's hard to be in "competition" with another teacher. When teams develop that true collaborative mindset they are less likely to see it as a competition but with the wrong dynamic sadly that's exactly what it could seem like. I think the common assessments also hold the teams accountable to each other because it's what they are agreeing to teach their kids.
  • formatively
    • leighbellville
       
      Formative assessment is such an important piece. Students need feedback throughout the learning process, and providing ungraded feedback is essential. For those interested in learning more about formative assessment, I found the book Embedded Formative Assessment by Dylan Wiliam to be helpful.
  • For example, if the teacher wants to assess knowledge mastery of a certain item, both selected-response and extended written response methods are good matches, whereas performance assessment or personal communication may be less effective and too time-consuming
    • leighbellville
       
      It is an important point to consider whether we are choosing the right assessment. I have observed previously when personal communication was chosen as the assessment method, which was not the best use of the student or teacher's time. Though opportunities should be provided for personal communication, we need to consider when it will have the most impact.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      Performance assessment can be time consuming but can be a big picture look and communication between student to student, student to teacher, student to expert can help grow as well. Earlier the article pointed out the need to have multiple measures. I see the need to really focus on what the goals are and use the table below to help people make decisions based on the current need.
  • A mechanism should be in place for students to track their own progress on learning targets and communicate their status to others.
    • leighbellville
       
      Asking students to track their own progress in relation to learning targets and communicate their status to others can be impactful. When students self-assess and dig deeper into the language of the learning targets to set goals, they will have a much clearer understanding of the expectations.
  • Only assessments that satisfy these standards—whether teachers' classroom assessments, department or grade-level common assessments, or benchmark or interim tests—will be capable of informing sound decisions.
    • carlarwall
       
      Having criteria for assessment and understanding the purpose is so important.
  • Do the results provide clear direction for what to do next?
    • carlarwall
       
      This statement is so important. When we are analyzing the results of assessment we should not just looking at how many points a student got. Digging deeper into what they were successful at, where they had any misconceptions and then planning from there is so important.
    • krcouch
       
      so important. They need to know where to go next and what they can do to improve.
  • current practice
    • Jen Van Fleet
       
      I'm going to push back on "current" here. I know that in Davenport teachers are working HARD to look at common formative assessments and daily quick checks to inform instruction so that kids are ready when they reach the common summative assessment. It's a work in progress, and not everything is perfection yet. However, conversations about learning in real time are happening, and it's awesome.
  • Most assumed that a low score or grade was probably justly assigned and that a decision made about a student as a result was as defensible as the evidence on which it was based
    • Heather Whitman
       
      moodle_iowa
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I have heard adults remember the testing as a child and parents say, "My child just isn't a good tester." I don't test very well. I avoided getting a masters from some schools because they required the GRE to get into the program. NO WAY! I often wonder why a GRE score determines who can take the courses and pay anyway? How should our colleges/universities look at the biases of testing and/or knowing some people haven't taken certain courses in 20 years?
  • multiple measures
    • krcouch
       
      I agree. Multiple measures is a better measure of sucess.
    • emmeyer
       
      Yes, this encourages our growth mindset!!
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think the multiple measures really help us see the whole kid. What if I am artistic in nature and don't show what I know on the basic tests? What if I am ultra creative in writing? What if my strength is technology, and I disengage because all I want to do is create. Multiple measures is imperative, and we need to look at different ways as well.
  • t also helps them assign the appropriate balance of points in relation to the importance of each target as well as the number of items for each assessed target.
  • wealth of data
    • bbraack
       
      There definitely is a wealth of data with all of the testing students have to go through. Sometimes it seems that nothing is really done with it or that there is so much that it is hard to understand or interpret the data.
    • emmeyer
       
      On the other hand, right now, our district only has the FAST test for reading and there are no other consistent assessments across the district.
  • NCLB has exposed students to an unprecedented overflow of testing.
    • bbraack
       
      It seems that students have to take so many tests, such as, Iowa Assessments, MAP, or whatever and it doesn't really seem much is done with the data. I know if I was a student I would be frustrated with all of the tests they have to take.
  • quality and balance
    • bbraack
       
      I think the key here is quality and balance, but because of all of the Standards that have to be taught in a year, sometimes the quality isn't what you would like and there really isn't a balance with all of the types of assessments students have to take.
    • Kim Foley-Sharp
       
      This is critical. We, and I really mean the state/districts go overboard at times and do too many assessments. Students and teachers need a balance - otherwise it is just another case of teaching to the "test'>
  • such as "Focuses on one specific aspect of the subject" or "Makes an assertion that can be argued."
    • blockerl
       
      I would be fine with this as long as the student also explains how their assignment "Focuses on one specific aspect of the subject." If we just as them to apply a piece of the rubric to their assignment, they are going to often just pick something that sounds pretty good and copy/paste it into the reflection.
  • The classroom is also a practical location to give students multiple opportunities to demonstrate what they know and can do, adding to the accuracy of the information available from that level of assessment.
    • blockerl
       
      This is a good point. Performance assessment and personal communication are great ways to measure a student's learning and/or knowledge. I think sometimes we forget about this because we are so used to preparing students for a selected-response test.
    • dassom
       
      I know giving multiple assessments over the same learning target can seem time consuming for teachers, and makes it less likely to happen. If teachers had training or ideas of how to assess in a fast or effective way they might be able to take advantage of this concepts, which most know is a valuable but hard to do with time constraints.
    • tifinifog
       
      Great idea. I like the idea of practical use. It goes back to the saying "when am I ever going to use this" statement. Its good to have students know or understand how, when or why they need to know.
  • clear statements of the intended learning
    • dassom
       
      I think of the clear learning targets as the lessons that the teachers are promising to teach. In my district we have pacing guides as well as end of the quarter assessments that are the same district wide. All the teachers are expected to teach these concepts. The style may be different but the outcome or learning targets still need align. It holds teachers accountable but also is promising the students fair curriculum district wide.
  • assessment literate
    • dassom
       
      I've never see this term before but I think it truly applies to the process of our CTT process in our district. We have the question to ask what do we do if the don't know it, and then the follow up question what do we do if they still don't know it. It's important for teams to understand what information will be obtained from the results and what the plan is for kids that are proficient or successful at the assessment the first or even second time around.
  • formative applications involve what students have mastered and what they still need to learn
    • staudtt
       
      This is something I still struggle with doing well. Sometimes it is a time thing, but helping guide students before the summative is important and I'm trying to better at.
  • effective feedback
    • srankin11
       
      Effective feedback is so important to student learning success. It's not the final grade that is important but the learning that has taken place.
  • teachers can choose among the four assessment methods
    • srankin11
       
      Assessing in a variety of ways helps to see what the student has learned. Giving short-answer formats may be quick to give results plus give practice to taking standardized tests. Having some assessments that require higher-order thinking may give other results that could be beneficial.
  • Assessment literacy is the foundation for a system that can take advantage of a wider use of multiple measures
    • jwalt15
       
      This is a powerful statement because I feel that assessment literacy and design is not an area of focus in teacher preparation programs. At least it wasn't a focus when I was an undergrad, but hopefully that is changing.
  • vague directions,
    • tifinifog
       
      Too often seen teachers have different ways of giving standardized tests. Some kids are allowed to read after test, others have to go over test until others done and others get to play on devices until finished. Kids want to hurry up to be done just to have fun. Consistency is crucial.
  • self-assess and set goals.
    • tifinifog
       
      This is a great example of how a teacher could let the student see the rubric prior to the project/test so they can set a goal or try to improve from a prior test.
  • It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think the key here is to use the Understanding by Design format. This helps people to focus on what truly needs learned. It is easy to lose track of the goals and the results are distorted or biased.
  • cultural insensitivity
    • Heather Whitman
       
      I think this is often overlooked. It is not intended and most are unaware. As our schools become more diversified, I think this is a huge part we need to address. We have to learn more about our students' lives and cultures. Then evaluate language or cultural expectations. Some cultures don't want students to look at people in their eye when talking. How does this work when they present? Are we thinking through what their thoughts are when presenting?
apeich

ollie1 (Peterman): Iowa Online Course Standards - 2 views

  • Proposed Online Course Standards
    • Steven Sand
       
      Out of curioustiy, will these proposed standards change in the coming years with Iowa Core?
  • The course content and activities are of sufficient rigor, depth, and breadth to teach the standards being addressed (iN 1.3, QM 5.1, ROI 3.c)
    • patesl
       
      I'm feeling that this class is very rigorous, tons of digging to do to learn the content. However, that opinion may be based on the fact I'm learning the vocabulary needed to comprehend assignments, etc. I'm relating to our ESL students, they face my frustration all the time when trying to interact with academic content without the understanding of vocabulary needed to fully learn the content.
  • (CP) • Course provider uses multiple ways of assessing course effectiveness.
    • patesl
       
      I'm glad to see that multiple assessments are used. If too much is placed on one major assessment there are bound to be those who can not show what they really know.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • (K-12) • 21st century skills, including information literacy and communication skills, are incorporated and taught as an integral part of the curriculum. (iN 1.4)
    • apeich
       
      I talk about 21st century skills and information literacy with public librarians a lot, and try to emphasize how important they are to education and that libraries should play more of a role supporting them. Now I have a specific standard to refer to. It's always nice to have something official to refer to.
  • • The course provides opportunities for appropriate student interaction with the content to foster mastery and application of the material. (ROI 3.a)
    • apeich
       
      This is where I struggle with designing online learning. I don't know enough about tools to create good interaction between the students and content. An additional hurdle for me is that I'm working with adult learners, many of whom are not comfortable with technology. So in addition to providing as much interactivity as possible, I need tools that are relatively easy to understand and use.
Jennifer Riedemann

ollie_4: Article: Attributes from Effective Formative Assessment (CCSSO) - 4 views

  • Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievement of intended instructional outcomes.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Has there ever been a time when teachers can't give feedback or adjust their own teaching because students refuse to do what was intended as an instructional task for learning? As an educator, I have some students who don't want to do anything, even when given a choice on how they might show their learning.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      Unfortunately, at least in my teaching experience, in content areas other than reading and writing, I have run into many teachers who believed in the Bell Curve still for classroom grading. Their numbers are dwindling, but they still exist along with teachers who believe, "I told them once. They should have it." I'm so glad your experiences make your question even possible. That is growth and improvement in instruction.
  • Learning goals and criteria for success should be clearly identified and communicated to students.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have found that learning goals are broader in scope since we no longer memorize, skill and drill, and have the detailed oriented mechanisms of learning in place. Maybe I am missing the boat, but I want my students to be: great speakers who project their voice(yes, I do use a decibel reader) when they are public speaking. It's a great to incorporate the science of speaking. I do want them to be great writers, and I will say a well written rubric can enhance this. I am also after great thinking and problem solving. I have found that the middle level learner can seem to problem solve in some situations, yet they have become inept at problem solving on how to "get a pencil" when they don't come to class with one in their possession. Being able to get along with many within their peer group would be great. This seems to be an ongoing battle for some individuals who "want to work" by themselves. I have had my share of accountants in my classroom.... :)
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Are you saying accountants are loners? They have to be able to work with clients :) (I'm a business teacher and just couldn't let this slide :)
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Jodi, That was a narrow view, please forgive me. I stand corrected by you....Thank you for your correction. I will say, I have students who want to work by themselves....that is great for reflection, yet collaboration is a skills that we all need to develop.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Mary, You are definitely not missing the boat! All those goals are excellent and very necessary for students to obtain. Do not give up on your broader learning goals and keep letting your students know that this is what you want for them. You might need a poster in your room with your broader goals stated on it as a constant reference for you and your students, and then post on your board your daily learning goals for your students. You are such a wonderful teacher and your students learn so much from you! Keep up the good work!
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Mary, I can absolutely relate to your comment about students that want to work by themselves! Some TAG students are "past masters" of wanting to do things on their own - I live with one!! Learning to collaborate is often a very difficult task for them in middle or high school. In my own experience, this improves for these high achievers when they reach college and are able to work with others that have similar abilities.
  • Descriptive feedback should be about the particular qualities of student learning with discussion or suggestions about what the student can do to improve.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have found it interesting how the "Boy's Town" model from a long time ago....always started with a positive statement of praise and supporting details; yet if negative feedback was needed, it would weave in concern statement that didn't use words like "but or however". For example: I can appreciate how your started your paragraph with energy and great discriptive words. As you work on your thesis, you may want to keep in mind.....or have you ever thought of....? Yes, constructive feedback is an "art form" when communicating to students who think they have excellence, yet fall short....I mean way short.
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I have never heard of the "Boy's Town" model but I like how you wrote about giving concerns to a student without using "but" or "however'- I can see that making such a difference and being more influential and beneficial to students!
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Too often the feedback is merely "corrective" - a check mark or "ok".
  • ...43 more annotations...
  • Creating such a culture requires teachers to model
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      This is huge, yet it is necessary.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      True, and it's the key to first level of helping students begin to grow!
    • anonymous
       
      The atmosphere has shifted, and we now not only have 'permission' to do this, but are expected.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      This is an absolute necessity!!!!
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Teachers need to ask more questions.
  • substantial interest in formative assessment
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      While the language of formative and summative assessment is relatively new as well as the new emphasis on direct feedback, the fact of the matter is that writing teachers have done these things forever. We just didn't package it with a fancy name in order to make oodles of $$. Dang it! ; )
  • is to provide evidence that is used by teachers and students to inform instruction and learning during the teaching/learning process
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      As I explain to my students, "If you can do this perfectly already, I shouldn't be teaching it."
    • Brooke Maine
       
      Haha, I like that Lorilee! I might have to steal it. :)
  • Learning Progressions:
  • Learning Goals and Criteria for Success
  • Descriptive Feedback:
  • Self- and Peer-Assessment:
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      This is another area where writing teachers have a distinct advantage and have been practicing these protocols for a long time.
  • Collaboration
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop--that's the entire premise of Nancy Atwelll's work.
  • process requires the teacher to share learning goals with students
    • anonymous
       
      It makes such perfect sense to be doing this, and I'm not sure how much it is actually done. Just like in our class here, we want to know what we are expected to pick up from this and appreciate having the opportunity to self-assess our learning in a format where we can get instant feedback to see if we understand.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Clair, To be honest, in my experience out in the schools as an AEA Literacy Consultant, it is being done very little. No matter how many times I include this in professional development trainings over things like effective instruction, iowa core, etc., there are truly only a handful of teachers that share their learning goals with the students. Many of them write the goals out in their lesson plans, but never get around to telling the people who really need the information.
  • and provide opportunities for students to monitor their ongoing progress.
  • learning progression teachers have the big picture of what students need to learn, as well as sufficient detail for planning instruction to meet short-term goals.
  • It should help the student answer three basic questions: Where am I going? Where am I now? How can I close the gap?
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I have done something pretty unique I think in my classroom. I (and several student volunteers) have spent a lot of time over the last couple years writing out each unit's learning objectives on posters that I laminate and hang on the wall in my classroom for every unit in every class. I made little, cute colored checkmarks that I also laminated and cut out. As we progress through the unit, I checkmark the learning objectives we have covered in class, so students can see very easily what we have done and what is left to cover. And above my posters, is another poster that says exactly what is written here: "Where amd I going? Where am I now? How can I close the gap?" I remember reading this quote during PD on FA, but now I know where it came from! :) It has taken a lot of time to make the posters and takes time to change them, put checkmarks on/off, etc, but I really like that it is a focal point in my room and is very unique. Students should know exactly what they are learning and use the questions above to self-assess as we go through our units.
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      That is a great idea! I am curious, have you found that your students are using the posters? Are they self-assessing? Are they taking ownership in their learning?
  • A teacher needs to have modeled good feedback with students and talked about what acceptable and unacceptable comments look like in order to have created a safe learning environment
    • anonymous
       
      Being able to give good constructive feedback is a skill that goes way beyond the classroom. It will serve students well later in life as they interact with co-workers, friends and eventually, their own children.
  • student- and peer-assessment should not be used in the formal grading process.
    • anonymous
       
      It's important to have students realize that they are not being graded on peer assessments.  It is only a benefit to give feedback about another person's assignment.  
  • teachers must provide the criteria by which learning will be assessed so that students will know whether they are successfully progressing toward the goal.
    • anonymous
       
      Students need to realize that they are progressing towards a goal.  If they don't see it, the quality of work usually isn't as great as when the goal is in mind.
  • self- and peer-assessment are important for providing students an opportunity to think meta-cognitively about their learning.
    • Mary Trent
       
      I think this needs to be used more often in the classroom. I know as teachers, we find collaborating with our peers to be so valuable and I think, if done correctly, students can also gain some very helpful insight into their learning.
  • supporting students as they monitor and take responsibility for their own learning, helping students to provide constructive feedback to each other, and involving students in decisions about how to move learning forward are illustrations of students and teachers working together in the teaching and learning process.
    • Mary Trent
       
      Amen! I think this statement is key. If students take ownership of their learning, they will become more passionate about it and ultimately want to do better for the pure knowledge and not just for a grade. Students need to feel as though they will have support through the learning process and will be able to rely on teachers and fellow students for help along their journey.
  • In peer-assessment, students analyze each others’ work using guidelines or rubrics and provide descriptive feedback that supports continued improvement.
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      I've been trying this with lab groups in order to promote discussion both about experimental techniques as well as data analysis. After the initial work, I split groups up and have each partner discuss results with a member of another group.
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I like that idea Jason! When we looked at rubrics at the beginning of this class and shared a rubric we use in our teaching, the project for the rubric I shared is something I always have students self-assess and peer-assess when the projects are complete. I then give the students a few days if they wish to make any changes before they turn the project in to me for a final grade. I have definitely seen an improvement in scores and cognitive thinking when I started the self- and peer-assessment.
  • This feeling is dependent on a classroom culture characterized by a sense of trust between and among students and their teachers; by norms of respect, transparency, and appreciation of differences; and by a non-threatening environment
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      All of these aspects are highlighed in the Characteristics of Effective Instruction in the Iowa Core.
  • during recent years
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I personally have learned a ton of information about FA the last several years. I took a class on it for my master's degree about 4 years ago or so and that next school year, it was the focus of PD in our district and is always something we revisit. I wish I would have learned more about it in college before I started teaching! But I'm glad to have the knowledge now.
  • Learning progressions describe how concepts and skills build in a domain, and show the trajectory of learning along which students are expected to progress.
    • Mike Todd
       
      I  know that in science, organizations like AAAS have worked hard to develop these progressions for many topics and created resources (Benchmarks, ATLAS, etc.).  But for some topics these need to be developed by the teacher.  And even with the AAAS resources, developing these learning progressions into a course that helps students connect everything together is the job of the teacher.  Collaborating on these tasks with other teachers is extremely worthwhile - I just wish this was valued by more school districts and administrators by allowing more time for these things during the school day.  Many seem to think that "courses" are already planned out.  I even had one superintendent that told me "Any minute not spent with students is a waste of time for teachers" - she was obviously lacking in knowledge about what professional teachers do with their time.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Good grief! I'm glad the state government is now stepping in to require schools to allow teacher collaboration. The only problem is the state's requirements are vastly lower than what should be and needs to be provided to teachers so that real collaboration on student progress and course development can happen.
  • The opening paragraph does not capture the audience’s attention because it does not clearly state what the speech is about. However, the opening sentence of the second paragraph states your position with an effective contrast. What can you do to improve or strengthen your opening paragraph?
    • Mike Todd
       
      I have often focussed on putting feedback on writing, similar to the last question, but have failed to include the preceding sentence - I agree that both are important.
  • Effective formative assessment involves collecting evidence about how student learning is progressing during the course of instruction so that necessary instructional adjustments can be made to close the gap between students’ current understanding and the desired goals.
    • Pam Rust
       
      This says it all. How many times do teachers check for understanding along the way and then just keep rolling through the lesson, ignoring the fact that some kids are missing something. Does no good to check for understanding as you go if you do nothing when the data says not everyone gets it yet.
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Why do so many teachers assign a grade to formative assessments when, according to this, it is to collect evidence on how student learning is progressing towards the desired goal?
    • Andrea Compton
       
      I have no idea Jodi, but I support a number of schools that firmly believe if they do not give something a grade then there is no use in doing it with the students. This statement is so perfect as to the purpose of formative assessment yet I would say the majority of teachers in the schools I come in contact with give a quiz, complain that the kids don't get it - as though it's all the kid's fault, and move right on with the content. It's frustrating!!
    • Dan Jones
       
      On the student side of Jodi's argument, many students do not see the importance of something if they are not getting a grade. Just yesterday, a couple of my students were complaining about something they had to do and they, "weren't even getting a grade on it so why bother". I agree with the statement that we need to see where they are, a lot of teachers just keep plowing through even though the infromation they get back indicates that a lot of students aren't getting it. It isn't helping the kid's perspective if they fail quizzes along the way and then fail a test.
  • Because the formative assessment process helps students achieve intended learning outcomes based on explicit learning progressions, teachers must first identify and then communicate the instructional goal to students.
    • Pam Rust
       
      Over the past few years we have worked on this during our PD. Goals are written on our boards and we refer to them often.