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Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Mercury and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Men - 0 views

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    Mercury and the risk of coronary heart disease in men.
    Yoshizawa K, Rimm EB, Morris JS, Spate VL, Hsieh CC, Spiegelman D, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC.
    N Engl J Med. 2002 Nov 28;347(22):1755-60.
    PMID: 12456851

    Conclusions Our findings do not support an association between total mercury exposure and the risk of coronary heart disease, but a weak relation cannot be ruled out.
Matti Narkia

Tofu and Cognitive Function: Food for Thought -- Grodstein et al. 19 (2): 207 -- Journa... - 0 views

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    Tofu and cognitive function: food for thought.
    Grodstein F, Mayeux R, Stampfer MJ.
    J Am Coll Nutr. 2000 Apr;19(2):207-9. Review.
    PMID: 10763901

    In addition, a plausible biologic hypothesis is generally an important part of judging epidemiologic relations. While high tofu intake may lead to lower plasma estrogen levels [12], we do not know how tofu influences estrogen levels in the brain; we also know very little about estrogen effects in men. Furthermore, data have not even consistently indicated that low endogenous estrogen levels are directly related to cognitive function in non-demented subjects [13]. The authors also posit a non-estrogen mediated hypothesis for the effects of tofu, namely that soy inhibits hippocampal tyrosine kinase and may block long-term potentiation (the likely mechanism by which humans learn and remember). Still, considerably more work must be done to substantiate this hypothesis.

    Finally, the single measures of outcome used in this study may have limited value, as cognitive function and brain structure change over time. Factors which predict these measures at one point may or may not be the same as those which predict decline over time; fundamentally, the public health interest is in preventing cognitive decline, as the steepness of the decline trajectory likely provides an early marker for risk of the more clinically relevant result-dementia.
Matti Narkia

More Good News About Vitamin D | Print Article | Newsweek.com - 0 views

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    "For more than 80 years, scientists have known that vitamin D is important for building bones. And for most of those 80 years, people thought this was the only thing it was good for. In the past decade, however, we've learned two important things about vitamin D: it appears to have many other important health effects, and many Americans don't get enough of it. In 2008, new research pointed to a vitamin D deficiency as a possible contributing factor in heart disease. And the suspected link between vitamin D deficiency and cancer grew even stronger. This surely will spur much new research in 2009.

    Why is vitamin D deficiency so common? The vitamin is made in our skin when sunlight strikes it. Many Americans-especially those who live in the northern part of the country, are elderly or have dark skin-don't soak up enough sun. And the vitamin isn't found in many foods. The main sources are fatty fish (such as salmon, mackerel, herring and sardines) and milk, cereal and juices that have been fortified with it. Vitamin D deficiency often is unsuspected because it causes no direct symptoms; like high blood pressure, it does its damage silently."
Matti Narkia

JAMA -- A Prospective Study of Egg Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Me... - 0 views

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    A prospective study of egg consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease in men and women.
    Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Rimm EB, Manson JE, Ascherio A, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, Spiegelman D, Speizer FE, Sacks FM, Hennekens CH, Willett WC.
    JAMA. 1999 Apr 21;281(15):1387-94.
    PMID: 10217054

    Results We documented 866 incident cases of CHD and 258 incident cases of stroke in men during 8 years of follow-up and 939 incident cases of CHD and 563 incident cases of stroke in women during 14 years of follow-up. After adjustment for age, smoking, and other potential CHD risk factors, we found no evidence of an overall significant association between egg consumption and risk of CHD or stroke in either men or women. The relative risks (RRs) of CHD across categories of intake were less than 1 per week (1.0), 1 per week (1.06), 2 to 4 per week (1.12), 5 to 6 per week (0.90), and >=1 per day (1.08) (P for trend=.75) for men; and less than 1 per week (1.0), 1 per week (0.82), 2 to 4 per week (0.99), 5 to 6 per week (0.95), and >=1 per day (0.82) (P for trend=.95) for women. In subgroup analyses, higher egg consumption appeared to be associated with increased risk of CHD only among diabetic subjects (RR of CHD comparing more than 1 egg per day with less than 1 egg per week among diabetic men, 2.02 [95% confidence interval, 1.05-3.87; P for trend=.04], and among diabetic women, 1.49 [0.88-2.52; P for trend=.008]).

    Conclusions These findings suggest that consumption of up to 1 egg per day is unlikely to have substantial overall impact on the risk of CHD or stroke among healthy men and women. The apparent increased risk of CHD associated with higher egg consumption among diabetic participants warrants further research.
Matti Narkia

Low-Carb and Mediterranean Diets Beat Low-Fat for Weight Loss, Lipid Changes at 2 Years... - 0 views

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    July 16, 2008 - Both a low-carbohydrate diet or a Mediterranean-style diet may be "effective alternatives" to a low-fat diet, with more favorable effects on lipids and/or glycemic control, new research suggests [1]. The two-year study, which managed to keep almost 85% of the 322 study participants on one of the three diets for the entire period, offers the hope that weight-loss diets can be tailored to personal preferences, without sacrificing efficacy, researchers say.

    "Several recent one-year dietary studies have led the American Diabetes Association to state in January 2008 that low-carb diets should be considered for a maximum of one year," lead author on the study, Dr Iris Shai (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel), told heartwire . "The current two-year study suggests that one low-fat diet doesn't fit all, meaning that the old paradigm should be reconsidered."

    Shai and colleagues publish the results of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) in the July 17, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine
Matti Narkia

Low-carb and Mediterranean diets beat low-fat for weight-loss, lipid changes at two yea... - 0 views

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    July 16, 2008 | Shelley Wood
    Beer-Sheva, Israel - Both a low-carbohydrate diet or a Mediterranean-style diet may be "effective alternatives" to a low-fat diet, with more favorable effects on lipids and/or glycemic control, new research suggests [1]. The two-year study, which managed to keep almost 85% of the 322 study participants on one of the three diets for the entire period, offers the hope that weight-loss diets can be tailored to personal preferences, without sacrificing efficacy, researchers say.

    "Several recent one-year dietary studies have led the American Diabetes Association to state in January 2008 that low-carb diets should be considered for a maximum of one year," lead author on the study, Dr Iris Shai (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel), told heartwire. "The current two-year study suggests that one low-fat diet doesn't fit all, meaning that the old paradigm should be reconsidered."

    Shai and colleagues publish the results of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) in the July 17, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Weight Loss with a Low-Carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or Low-Fat Diet - 0 views

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    Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet.
    Shai I, Schwarzfuchs D, Henkin Y, Shahar DR, Witkow S, Greenberg I, Golan R, Fraser D, Bolotin A, Vardi H, Tangi-Rozental O, Zuk-Ramot R, Sarusi B, Brickner D, Schwartz Z, Sheiner E, Marko R, Katorza E, Thiery J, Fiedler GM, Blüher M, Stumvoll M, Stampfer MJ; Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) Group.
    N Engl J Med. 2008 Jul 17;359(3):229-41.
    PMID: 18635428

    Conclusions Mediterranean and low-carbohydrate diets may be effective alternatives to low-fat diets. The more favorable effects on lipids (with the low-carbohydrate diet) and on glycemic control (with the Mediterranean diet) suggest that personal preferences and metabolic considerations might inform individualized tailoring of dietary interventions. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00160108 [ClinicalTrials.gov] .)
Matti Narkia

Prospective Study of Predictors of Vitamin D Status and Cancer Incidence and Mortality ... - 0 views

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    Prospective study of predictors of vitamin D status and cancer incidence and mortality in men.
    Giovannucci E, Liu Y, Rimm EB, Hollis BW, Fuchs CS, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC.
    J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Apr 5;98(7):451-9.
    PMID: 16595781
    doi:10.1093/jnci/djj101

    Conclusions: Low levels of vitamin D may be associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality in men, particularly for digestive-system cancers. The vitamin D supplementation necessary to achieve a 25(OH)D increment of 25 nmol/L may be at least 1500 IU/day.
Matti Narkia

Prospective study of predictors of vitamin D status and survival in patients with color... - 0 views

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    Prospective study of predictors of vitamin D status and survival in patients with colorectal cancer
    K Ng, B M Wolpin, J A Meyerhardt, K Wu, A T Chan, B W Hollis, E L Giovannucci, M J Stampfer, W C Willett and C S Fuchs
    Br J Cancer 101: 916-923; advance online publication, August 18, 2009; doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605262
Matti Narkia

Evidence-based decision making on micronutrients and chronic disease: long-term randomi... - 0 views

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    Evidence-based decision making on micronutrients and chronic disease: long-term randomized controlled trials are not enough.
    Ames BN, McCann JC, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Aug;86(2):522-3; author reply 523-4.
    PMID: 17684228
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D in the Spotlight; This critical nutrient builds bones, helps fight infection ... - 0 views

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    For many years, vitamin D was boring--even to doctors. Because it was considered good for bones and not much else, multitaskers like vitamin A, B vitamins and vitamin E hogged all the press. But recent studies have thrust this long-neglected nutrient into the spotlight. Scientists now think vitamin D may affect everything from diabetes to cancer. They're also finding that many people don't have enough of it.
Matti Narkia

A 22-y prospective study of fish intake in relation to prostate cancer incidence and mo... - 0 views

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    A 22-y prospective study of fish intake in relation to prostate cancer incidence and mortality.
    Chavarro JE, Stampfer MJ, Hall MN, Sesso HD, Ma J.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1297-303.
    PMID: 18996866

    Conclusion: These results suggest that fish intake is unrelated to prostate cancer incidence but may improve prostate cancer survival.

Matti Narkia

JAMA -- A Prospective Study of Egg Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Me... - 0 views

  •  
    A prospective study of egg consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease in men and women.
    Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Rimm EB, Manson JE, Ascherio A, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, Spiegelman D, Speizer FE, Sacks FM, Hennekens CH, Willett WC.
    JAMA. 1999 Apr 21;281(15):1387-94.
    PMID: 10217054

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that consumption of up to 1 egg per day is unlikely to have substantial overall impact on the risk of CHD or stroke among healthy men and women. The apparent increased risk of CHD associated with higher egg consumption among diabetic participants warrants further research.
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