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Healthy ways to beat the blues « World Vitamins Online - 3 views

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    Well, no, not if you're really clinically depressed, but studies have proven that some simple changes in your lifestyle can help combat the holiday blues. According to WebMD.com, "Dietary changes can bring about changes in your brain structure, both chemically and physiologically. Those changes can improve mood and mental outlook."
Matti Narkia

Ginkgo Biloba Doesn't Slow Mental Decline - 0 views

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    "Dec. 29, 2009 - The hot-selling herbal supplement ginkgo biloba doesn't slow age-related mental decline, a six-year clinical study shows.

    The study has already shown that ginkgo does not prevent dementia or Alzheimer's disease in the elderly.

    Now study leader Steven T. DeKosky, MD, and colleagues have sifted through the data to look for some sign that ginkgo might slow mental decline in healthy, aging individuals -- or, perhaps, in those already showing the first signs of cognitive impairment.

    No such sign was found.

    "Compared with placebo, the use of Ginkgo biloba, 120 mg twice daily, did not result in less cognitive decline in older adults with normal cognition or with mild cognitive impairment," the researchers conclude."
Matti Narkia

BERBERINE: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings - WebMD - 0 views

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    Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver.
    Berberine might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking berberine along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking berberine, talk to your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that are changed by the liver.
    Some medications changed by the liver include cyclosporin (Neoral, Sandimmune), lovastatin (Mevacor), clarithromycin (Biaxin), indinavir (Crixivan), sildenafil (Viagra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others."
Matti Narkia

'Superfoods' Everyone Needs - 0 views

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    "Imagine a superfood -- not a drug -- powerful enough to help you lower your cholesterol, reduce your risk of heart disease and cancer, and, for an added bonus, put you in a better mood. Did we mention that there are no side effects? You'd surely stock up on a lifetime supply. Guess what? These life-altering superfoods are available right now in your local supermarket.

    "The effect that diet can have on how you feel today and in the future is astounding," says nutritionist Elizabeth Somer, author of Nutritionfor aHealthy Pregnancy, Food & Mood, and The Essential Guide to Vitamins and Minerals.

    "Even people who are healthy can make a few tweaks and the impact will be amazing," Somer says. "I'd say that 50% to 70% of suffering could be eliminated by what people eat and how they move: heart disease, diabetes, cancer, hypertension can all be impacted.""
Matti Narkia

Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes - 0 views

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    "Aug. 31, 2009 -- Eating a Mediterranean-style diet may help people with type 2 diabetes keep their disease under control without drugs better than following a typical low-fat diet.

    A new study from Italy shows that people with type 2 diabetes who ate a Mediterranean diet rich in vegetables and whole grains with at least 30% of daily calories from fat (mostly olive oil) were better able to manage their disease without diabetes medications than those who ate a low-fat diet with no more than 30% of calories from fat (with less than 10% coming from saturated fat choices).

    After four years, researchers found that 44% of people on the Mediterranean diet ended up requiring diabetes medications to control their blood sugars compared with 70% of those who followed the low-fat diet.

    It's one of the longest-term studies of its kind, and researchers, including Katherine Esposito, MD, of the Second University of Naples, say the results "reinforce the message that benefits of lifestyle interventions should not be overlooked.""
Matti Narkia

Low Vitamin D Levels May Raise Heart Risk - 0 views

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    "Study Shows Vitamin D Supplements May Be Useful in Preventing Heart Disease

    Nov. 16, 2009 (Orlando, Fla.) -- Some men with low levels of vitamin D in their blood are at particularly high risk of developing heart disease and weakened bones that can lead to osteoporosis, researchers report.

    In a study of more than 1,000 men, those with low levels of both vitamin D and the sex hormone estrogen were at significantly increased risk of having cardiovascular disease, says study head Erin Michos, MD, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins.

    "They were also at dramatically increased risk of osteopenia," or bone loss that can lead to osteoporosis, she says.

    "Our results suggest that vitamin D supplements, which are already prescribed to treat osteoporosis, may also be useful in preventing heart disease," Michos tells WebMD.

    Men with low levels of vitamin D and testosterone, on the other hand, were not at heightened risk for heart disease or osteopenia."
Matti Narkia

High Doses of Vitamin D Cut MS Relapses - 0 views

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    "April 28, 2009 (Seattle) -- High doses of vitamin D dramatically cut the relapse rate in people with multiple sclerosis, a study shows.

    Sixteen percent of 25 people with multiple sclerosis (MS) given an average of 14,000 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day for a year suffered relapses, says Jodie Burton, MD, a neurologist at the University of Toronto. In contrast, close to 40% of 24 MS patients who took an average of 1,000 IU a day -- the amount recommended by many MS specialists -- relapsed, she says.

    Also, people taking high-dose vitamin D suffered 41% fewer relapses than the year before the study began, compared with 17% of those taking typical doses.

    People taking high doses of vitamin D did not suffer any significant side effects, Burton tells WebMD."
Matti Narkia

Baked Fish Beats Fried for Omega-3 Boost - 0 views

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    "Study Shows Baked Fish Is Better for Heart Health Than Fried, Salted, or Dried

    Nov. 19, 2009 (Orlando, Fla.) -- When it comes to reaping the heart-healthy benefits of omega-3 fatty acids in fish, it often comes down to how you prepare it, a study shows.

    "The take-home message is that it's better to bake or boil the fish instead of frying it," says study researcher Lixin Meng, MS, a doctoral candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. And adding a dash of low-sodium soy sauce will enhance the heart-healthy benefits, she tells WebMD.

    Eating salted, dried, or fried fish, on the other hand, is not beneficial, Meng says. "But if it's a fun occasion and you really want fried fish, do it the Japanese way -- stir-fry, rather than deep-fry it.""
Matti Narkia

Eating Red Meat May Boost Death Risk - WebMD - 0 views

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    March 23, 2009 -- Men and women who eat higher amounts of red meat and processed meat have a higher risk of dying from cancer, heart disease, and other causes compared to those who eat less, according to a new study.

    Those in the study who ate the most red meat took in about 4.5 ounces a day -- the equivalent of a small steak.
Matti Narkia

Wine Won't Cut Breast Cancer Risk - 0 views

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    March 9, 2009 -- Red or white wine with dinner? A new study suggests a woman's wine choice should be based on personal preference rather than any hope that a wine's color may affect its breast cancer-fighting ability.

    "We found no difference between red or white wine in relation to breast cancer risk. Neither appears to have any benefits," researcher Polly Newcomb, PhD, MPH, head of the Cancer Prevention Program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, says in a news release.
Matti Narkia

Alcohol's Effects: Old vs. Young People - 0 views

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    March 6, 2009 -- Social drinking seems to impair older people more than their younger drinking buddies. Also, older people are less likely to realize how the alcohol is affecting them, according to a new study.
Matti Narkia

Low Vitamin D Hurts Teenagers' Hearts - 0 views

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    March 11, 2009 -- Low vitamin D levels greatly increase a teenager's risk of diabetes and heart disease, Johns Hopkins researchers find.

    It is becoming clear that adults who get too little vitamin D are at higher risk for diabetes and heart disease. Now, it appears vitamin D levels also affect these risks earlier in life, say Johns Hopkins researchers Jared P. Reis, PhD, and colleagues.
Matti Narkia

'Superfoods' Everyone Needs - WebMD - 0 views

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    Imagine a superfood -- not a drug -- powerful enough to help you lower your cholesterol, reduce your risk of heart disease and cancer, and, for an added bonus, put you in a better mood. Did we mention that there are no side effects? You'd surely stock up on a lifetime supply. Guess what? These life-altering superfoods are available right now in your local supermarket.
Matti Narkia

Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Colds - WebMD - 0 views

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    Feb. 23, 2009 -- A walk in the sun may be better than popping a vitamin C tablet for boosting your chances of preventing the common cold or flu.\n\nA new study adds to mounting evidence that vitamin C may have been stealing the spotlight all these years from the real cold fighter, vitamin D.
Matti Narkia

Too Little Vitamin D Puts Heart at Risk - 0 views

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    Dec. 1, 2008 -- Getting too little vitamin D may be an underappreciated heart disease risk factor that's actually easy to fix.\n\nResearchers say a growing body of evidence suggests that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of heart disease and is linked to other, well-known heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes.
Matti Narkia

WebMD - Better Information. Better Health. - 0 views

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    WebMD provides valuable health information, tools for managing your health, and support to those who seek information.\n\nThe WebMD content staff blends award-winning expertise in medicine, journalism, health communication and content creation to bring you the best health information possible. Our esteemed colleagues at MedicineNet.com are frequent contributors to WebMD and comprise our Medical Editorial Board
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