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Phil Brown

Why Creativity in the Classroom Matters More Than Ever | Edudemic - 62 views

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    We need to teach our students to be adaptable, and to understand that to be creative means hard work.
mostrum

25 classroom management strategies to get silence from a noisy group of students - Beha... - 122 views

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    25 great ideas for getting loud classes to quiet down.
H DeWaard

We Don't Need To Use Them, Even If They're There! | Living Avivaloca - 35 views

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    This morning, I saw a tweet from HJ DeWaard: a teacher that I love learning with and from on Twitter. The moment I read the blog post, I knew what I would be writing about tonight. The truth is, in...
H DeWaard

Genius Hour | Mr. C's SharesEase - 53 views

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    This great video clearly outlines Genius Hour movement  happening in classrooms across the world! After reflecting for a few months on how to initiate #GeniusHour in my classroom I finally jumped i...
scotchcornered

Fostering learner autonomy in the classroom - 40 views

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    Slideshare on fostering Autonomy
Matt Renwick

Blogging in a Primary Classroom-With Only One iPad! - 34 views

  • Just think of the possibilities this holds for young pre-writers to share the things they create!
  • read the words aloud to the child
  • Students have a choice
Jennifer Diaz

13 Strategies to Improve Student Classroom Discussions - 148 views

  • These 13-teacher and expert-tested strategies will strengthen your students' ability to find and use evidence from any text
  • Texts that inspire questions encourage students to return to the text and find support for their answers
  • starting with one overarching focus question
  • ...14 more annotations...
  • Require students to have evidence ready at the start of the discussion
  • "prove it"
  • evidence will actually open up a text to different interpretations
  • The challenge is getting students to expand and explain. To get students to explain why they choose a piece of evidence, provide them with a structure that moves from evidence to interpretation. Williams' students use a graphic organizer with three columns: They write their answer in the first column, note textual evidence in the second, and explain their evidence in the third.
    • Jennifer Diaz
       
      I want to do this!
  • Use sentence starters strategically
  • In the text ... the author mentions ...
  • the author uses this evidence to ... this lets us know that ...
  • Give students enough time to flip through and find just the right piece of evidence. If other students are getting antsy, choose one of your always-ready students to share, then loop back to the student who needed time with the text
    • Jennifer Diaz
       
      Good idea to keep the pace moving, while providing enough time to find better evidence.
    • deniseahlquist
       
      And if you encourage a collaborative atmosphere, having students ALL look for evidence related to each person's idea will mean they are all engaged in searching whenever anyone makes a claim. Either choose someone who has found it, or have them mark the page and keep searching for more evidence. Then have students ALL GO to the passage cited, so they can closely follow and respond with additional or conflicting evidence.
  • "Just because there's more than one right answer," says Riley, "doesn't mean there's no wrong answer."
    • deniseahlquist
       
      Part of what students do when they all look for evidence for each idea is to learn to weigh evidence for competing ideas and sift out "weaker" or unsupported answers from "stronger" claims. Brainstorming an idea that later doesn't pan out should not e seen as bad or wrong, but more accurately as the way idea-generating and sifting actually happens in many situations.
  • According to page
  • create an anchor chart
    • Jennifer Diaz
       
      Create and authentic anchor chart of student/teacher generated starters and prompts.
  • Listen for how students personalize the discussion, and encourage them to develop their own voice.
  • go back to the text
  • They answer the focus question a second time, explain whether or not they changed their answers, and reflect on how the evidence brought up during discussion impacted their thinking.
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    Great ideas for 6th grade response to literature discussion and writing.
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    I haven't taught sixth grade for 3 1/2 years now, but if I ever go back to ms, I'd incorporate this into my weekly plans. One way I get my second graders to grow their thinking is by having them respond to one another using the following prompts:

     I agree with the part about…
     Going back to what you said about…
     One thing I noticed…
     One thing I pictured…
     It reminded me of…
     I am not sure what you are saying. Could you say it in another way?
     I agree with what you are saying because…
     What you just said matches what is in my mind because…
     I hear what you are saying, but I see it differently because…
     If what you said is true, is it not also true that…
     That is true, but…
    Or - That is true, and…
     Could you say more?
     Could you give me an example?
     I would like to add on to what _________ said.
     I have an example of what you just said.
     I wonder why…
     I was surprised to see…
     Another thing that goes with that is…
     So are you saying…
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