Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items tagged Resources

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Kim Loeffen

A Personalized Learning Backlash -- THE Journal - 10 views

    • Kim Loeffen
       
      Elementary school Summit backlash includes concerns on data usage and other issues
  • personalized instruction is getting renewed attention as schools in the northeast consider calling their experiments in the instructional model a failure.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • there's "little evidence for the effectiveness" of personalized instruction delivered through technology.
    • Kim Loeffen
       
      Student protest of an online Facebook driven learning "experience" causes the NY DOE to drop the program in grades 11-12
Nigel Coutts

Holiday Reading - Christmas 2019 - The Learner's Way - 10 views

  •  
    With the Christmas Holiday's finally here this is the perfect opportunity to catch up on some of that reading which has been delayed while more pressing matters are dealt with. Here are the top items on my holiday reading list. With a project underway that explores a conceptual based approach to teaching mathematics there is a bias in that direction. 
Martin Burrett

Prowise Presenter entirely free of charge - 16 views

  •  
    "Prowise has made all the unique education possibilities that Prowise Presenter has to offer accessible to everyone, for free. This applies to non-paying, paying and new users. From now on, everyone has free access to all the functionalities the education software has to offer. This way the company, based in Birmingham, makes progress towards their ambition to make digital education accessible for everyone, globally."
Nigel Coutts

The trouble with Twitter - The Learner's Way - 21 views

  •  
    Twitter is a great place for educators to share ideas. It has become my go to place when I am looking for something to read, a new idea or some inspiration. It is a great avenue for sharing practice, asking questions and building a community.    But . . .   . . . Twitter has some problems and these seems to be growing. To get the most out of Twitter a degree of caution is advised.
Siri Anderson

Primers - The Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL) - 14 views

  •  
    Useful resources on varied topics of importance today. Computational thinking, data science, citizen science etc.
Devin Page

Henry Clay and the American System for kids *** - 6 views

  • Taxing all foreign goods, to boost the sales of US products and protect manufacturers from cheap British goods
  • ● Introducing a protective Tariff to enable the nation to raise money from these taxes and at the same time protect the nation's goods from cheaper priced foreign items
    • Devin Page
       
      Which region of the country did not like tariffs that were meant to help manufacturers in the north?
  • Roads and canals were built that enabled Americans to travel and the Cumberland Road, the Erie Canal were constructed
    • Devin Page
       
      Where did the Cumberland Road take travelers? How about the Erie Canal?
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • The American System helped to fuel the belief in the Manifest Destiny of the United States
    • Devin Page
       
      So which region probably benefited from the American system?
  • The American System helped to fuel the belief in the Manifest Destiny of the United States
  • ● Henry Clay's American System eventually ran out of steam during the administration of President Jackson
    • Devin Page
       
      Which region of the country seemed to most supprt Andrew Jackson?
msletizia

Novel HyperDoc Template (Elementary Level) - Google Slides - 40 views

  •  
    This is a free and fabulous template to encourage struggling readers and engage learners.
Clint Heitz

Screen Reading Worse for Grasping Big Picture, Researchers Find - Digital Education - E... - 27 views

  • Among young adults who regularly use smartphones and tablets, just reading a story or performing a task on a screen instead of on paper led to greater focus on concrete details, but less ability to infer meaning or quickly get the gist of a problem,
  • The findings align with other emerging research on how students process information differently in print and digital forms. A 2014 series of experiments found that while taking more notes overall was better than taking fewer, students who typed notes on their laptops rather than writing them on paper tended to take down information verbatim rather than summarizing concepts, and the more students wrote verbatim, the less they remembered a week later. 
  • For example, she said, teachers should consider the format of information when designing different types of activities, to help students focus on details or overall themes. 
Clint Heitz

Department of Psychology | JMU - 10 views

  • If the new trend in textbooks is moving them to computer screens, the switch could have negative consequences as many suggest that people skim more, process more shallowly, and may retain less information when reading online, Daniel said.
  • he readers’ goals are different: Individuals reading an e-book for enjoyment aren’t required to pass a comprehension-based test afterward. While they found that learning is possible from both formats, learning from e-textbooks takes longer and requires more effort to reach the same level of understanding, even in a controlled lab environment. At home, students report taking even more time to read e-textbooks as well as higher rates of muti-tasking (e.g., Facebook, electronic chat, texting, email, etc.) than do their peers using printed textbooks.
  • In their preliminary findings, the scanning pattern produced when the student read a textbook showed consistent reading from line to line down the page. But the scanning pattern from reading on the screen was less intense.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Daniel and Jakobsen argue that the information dense textbooks characteristic of natural and social science subjects are not a good fit for current e-textbooks, but there are exceptions for subjects like chemistry and math that include doing formulas and other activities. The liability, Daniel emphasizes, comes when math and chemistry teachers hope their students will learn the explanations, not just the formulas, “Students tend to skip the text and go straight to the formulas, especially if they are graded.”
Clint Heitz

This Is How The Way You Read Impacts Your Memory And Productivity - 17 views

  • Studies have shown that taking notes by longhand will help you remember important meeting points better than tapping notes out on your laptop or smartphone. The reason for that could be that “writing stimulates an area of the brain called the RAS (reticular activating system), which filters and brings clarity to the fore the information we’re focusing on
  • says one explanation for the benefit of reading analog books may come down to something called metacomprehension deficit. “Metacomprehension refers to how well we are ‘in touch with,’ literally speaking, our own comprehension while reading,” says Mangen. “For instance, how much time do you spend reading a text in order to understand it well enough to solve a task afterwards?”
  • “Length does indeed seem to be a central issue, and closely related to length are a number of other dimensions of a text, e.g., structure and layout. Is the content presented in such a way that it is required that you keep in mind several occurrences/text places at the same time?” says Mangen. In other words, she says, complexity and information density may play a role in the importance of the medium providing the text.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • “It is not–and should not be–a question of either/or, but of using the most appropriate medium in a given situation, and for a given material/content and purpose of reading,”
  • As the study cited above mentions, like other digital readers, you probably think you are absorbing the information better than you actually are, and thus move through the book faster.A simple solution to this is to simply slow down and take more time reading the material, and you might absorb the information just as well as those who naturally take longer to read a paper book.
Clint Heitz

Which is better -- reading in print or on-screen? - 12 views

  • In a review of educational research published by SAGE Journals in July, Singer and University of Maryland professor Patricia Alexander discovered that readers may not comprehend complex or lengthy material as well when they view it digitally as when they read it on paper. While they concluded with a call for more research, the pair wrote, “It is fair to say that reading digitally is part and parcel of living and learning in the 21st century … No matter how complex the question of reading across mediums may be, teachers and students must understand how and when to employ a digital reading device.”
  • In an interview with “Inside Digital Learning,” Singer confirmed, “Digital devices aren’t going anywhere. This no longer is a question of, ‘Will the digital device be in your classroom?’ but ‘What do we know about the digital device, and how can we make this equal to print?’”
  • For example, she said instructors should take the time to show students how to annotate a PDF and make them aware that most people read more quickly on a screen than in print and therefore could lose some comprehension. She also suggested that teachers ask students to answer, in one sentence, what the overall point of the text was every time they read a chapter or an article online.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • “Sometimes students only need to get the main idea,” Singer said, “and then digital is just as good as print and a lot quicker … But if you want deep comprehension and synthesis of the material, have the students print it out and navigate the material that way. Think about what you want students to get out of a lesson” before assigning a printed or digital reading.
  • Donovan added, “I do agree that we’ve got to figure this out … because it isn’t going away, for sure, for lots of reasons: accessibility, cost, sustainability. We have to figure out how we can support students in comprehending from this format.”
  • But he said he believes “we can still get as much meaning out of digital text. We just haven’t found the right transitions to do what we actually do with a physical book, with digital text … We haven’t found the digital equivalent of interacting with text. We haven’t really trained people to do that.”
Clint Heitz

Do we read differently on paper than on a screen? - 9 views

  • In total, there are more than 180 researchers from 33 different countries participating in the COST-initiated research network E-READ, reading in an age of digital transformation. This network examines the effects and consequences of digital developments in terms of reading.
  • It is not a case of "one size fits all," but patterns are beginning to emerge from empirical research into the subject. The length of the text seems to be the most critical factor. If the text is long, needs to be read carefully and perhaps involves making notes, then studies show that many people, including young people such as students, still often prefer a printed book, even if it is available as both an e-book and in electronic formats with options for making notes, enabling the user to search for and highlight the text digitally. This is not the case when it comes to shorter texts.
  • When reading long, linear, continuous texts over multiple pages that require a certain amount of concentration, referred to as "Deep Reading," the reader often experiences better concentration and a greater overview when reading from a printed medium compared to a screen. When we are reading from a screen, only one section can be seen at a time and the available reading surface area is limited. If you read a printed medium such as a book, several text areas are available simultaneously and it feels easier to form an overview and make notes in the margins.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • However, an interesting finding in some of the empirical studies is that we tend to overestimate our own reading comprehension when we read on screen compared to on paper.
  • it has been found that we tend to read faster on screen and consequently understand less compared to when reading from paper. This is a very new research topic and there are studies that have not found any differences in this area.
  • such findings do highlight something very important, namely that we may have a different mental attitude to what we read on a screen. This has very significant implications, including in the context of education.
  • For example, reading literature has proven to have a stimulating effect on the imagination and encourage the development of empathy. Reading has an effect on our ability to concentrate and for abstract thinking. We want to discover if such processes are influenced by the reading medium.
  • There is a need for more empirical research on reading comprehension in terms of screen reading and also on the subjective reading experience.
1 - 20 of 3113 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page