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Nigel Coutts

Asking Why and Why and Why - The Learner's Way - 13 views

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    As children, we ask "Why?" a lot. It is a part of childhood, that special time when the many forces acting upon our cognitive development converge around a singular desire to ask "Why". It becomes the central focus of our conversational style, an incessant exclamation into the void which tests the patience of any nearby adult. But asking "Why" offers so much more.
Nigel Coutts

Taking risks outside our comfort zone - The Learner's Way - 17 views

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    Possibly the most dangerous place to spend too much time is inside your comfort zone. Only when we take a risk and step away from the safety of the familiar and the ways we have always done things do we expose ourselves to new ideas and become open to the possibility of learning and discovery. The trouble is having the confidence to take that first step, to embrace discomfort and become open to the risks that come with trying something new.
Nigel Coutts

Why such a rapid pace of change? - The Learner's Way - 12 views

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    I am currently reading "Thank you for being late: An optimist's guide to thriving in the age of accelerations" and have found in this the answer to these questions. In essence we are confronting two types of change, one that we have always faced and one that is unique to our current times. 
globalwrobel

Digital Natives: Do They Really THINK Differently? - 38 views

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    by Marc Prensky Our children today are being socialized in a way that is vastly different from their parents. The
    numbers are overwhelming: over 10,000 hours playing videogames, over 200,000 emails and
    instant messages sent and received; over 10,000 hours talking on digital cell phones; over 20,000
    hours watching TV (a high percentage fast speed MTV), over 500,000 commercials seen-all
    before the kids leave college. And, maybe, at the very most, 5,000 hours of book reading. These
    are today's ―Digital Native‖ students.
    1
    In Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants: Part I, I discussed how the differences between our Digital
    Native students and their Digital Immigrant teachers lie at the root of a great many of today's
    educational problems. I suggested that Digital Natives' brains are likely physically different as a
    result of the digital input they received growing up. And I submitted that learning via digital
    games is one good way to reach Digital Natives in their ―native language.‖
    Here I present evidence for why I think this is so. It comes from neurobiology, social psychology, and from studies done on children using games for learning.
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    by Marc Prensky Our children today are being socialized in a way that is vastly different from their parents. The
    numbers are overwhelming: over 10,000 hours playing videogames, over 200,000 emails and
    instant messages sent and received; over 10,000 hours talking on digital cell phones; over 20,000
    hours watching TV (a high percentage fast speed MTV), over 500,000 commercials seen-all
    before the kids leave college. And, maybe, at the very most, 5,000 hours of book reading. These
    are today's ―Digital Native‖ students.
    1
    In Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants: Part I, I discussed how the differences between our Digital
    Native students and their Digital Immigrant teachers lie at the root of a great many of today's
    educational problems. I suggested that Digital Natives' brains are likely physically different as a
    result of the digital input they received growing up. And I submitted that learning via digital
    games is one good way to reach Digital Natives in their ―native language.‖
    Here I present evidence for why I think this is so. It comes from neurobiology, social psychology, and from studies done on children using games for learning.
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    Hi.

    I wrote a paper about digital natives as part of an anthropology assignment for a doctoral course. Researchers from around the world have empirically proven that Prensky's theories are false. Additionally, while neuroscience has shown that brains do change as a result of neuroplasticity, to argue that it is generational is also a false claim.

    Though cognitive theory shows that learners bring their prior experiences to the interpretation of new educational opportunities - impacting attention and interpretation - all generations have had this occur. There is merit to the point that we should take learner's prior experience into consideration when designing instruction; however, Prensky's digital native claims may have done more to create tension between students and teachers than to provide instructional support.

    If you would like any of the scholarly studies, I have a published reference list at http://brholland.com/reference-list.

    Beth
Nigel Coutts

Avoiding Assessment Mistakes - The Learner's Way - 54 views

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    Assessment is arguably the piece of the learning cycle we get most wrong. Whether looked at from the perspective of the learner, the teacher, the school administrator, the politician or the parent, assessment is misunderstood and poorly utilised as a tool for learning. The importance of changing this situation is only made more salient in light of the countless research studies from the likes of Jon Hattie & Dylan Wiliam that points to the power of effective assessment. So, what are the common mistakes and how might we avoid them?
Maureen Greenbaum

How diplomas based on skill acquisition, not credits earned, could change education - T... - 15 views

  • a new teaching approach here called “proficiency-based education” that was inspired by a 2012 state law.
  • law requires that by 2021, students graduating from Maine high schools must show they have mastered specific skills to earn a high school diploma.
  • CompetencyWorks, a national organization t
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • By 2021, schools must offer diplomas based students reaching proficiency in the four core academic subject areas: English, math, science and social studies. By 2025, four additional subject areas will be included: a second language, the arts, health and physical education.
  • proficiency-based idea has also created headaches at some schools for teachers trying to monitor students’ individual progress.
  • Students have more flexibility to learn at their own pace and teachers get time to provide extra help for students who need it
  • It wasn’t for lack of trying,” Bowen said. “It was a systems design problem.”

  • offer students clarity about what they have to learn and how they are expected to demonstrate they’ve learned it.
  • at schools that have embraced the new system, teachers say they are finding that struggling students are seeing the biggest gains because teachers are given more time to re-teach skills and students better understand the parameters for earning a diploma.

  • Deciding to believe that all students are capable of learning all of the standards, she said, “was scary.”
  • Multiple-choice questions have virtually disappeared. Homework is checked, but not graded.
  • students get less than a proficient score, they must go back and study the skill they missed. They are then given a chance to retake the relevant portions of the test until they earn a satisfactory score.
  • We inherited a structure for schooling that was based on time and on philosophical beliefs that learning would be distributed across a bell curve,
  • get crystal clear about what we want students to know and be able to do and then how to measure it.”
Deborah Baillesderr

SMMRY - Summarize Everything - 47 views

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    A site that summarizes long articles focusing on main ideas and important details.
Deborah Baillesderr

Resources on Learning and the Brain | Edutopia - 27 views

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    Browse a list of articles, videos, and other links for brain research in education.
Deborah Baillesderr

Oregon Trail, The : MECC : Free Streaming : Internet Archive - 45 views

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    Who remembers Oregon Trail? My students and I loved this game and it taught them so much. Now you can play online, just in case you didn't know.
Nigel Coutts

Learning by playing, tinkering and making - The Learner's Way - 41 views

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    Play is a vital tool for learning. It should be vital part of every child's learning; the norm rather than the exception and we leave it behind as we become adults to our own peril. 
Nigel Coutts

The art of modern writing - The Learner's Way - 52 views

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    Learning to write is one of the fundamental skills we gain from our time at school. Writing is one of the cornerstones of learning and we devote significant time and energy towards its mastery. Skilled writing is a mark of an educated individual and a skill required for academic success. But in the modern world what makes a skilled writer? What has changed about writing and what literary skills should we focus our attention on. 
Nigel Coutts

Creativity is a beautiful, messy chaotic thing - The Learner's Way - 33 views

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    Creativity is often said to be the key to the future. The essentially human attribute that will ensure our utility in a world dominated by automation. It is said to be an essential ingredient in education but it will not be truly learned unless we provide students with opportunities to dive fully into its waters. 
Martin Burrett

May 2017 UKEdChat Magazine - 16 views

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    Free online education magazine
Nigel Coutts

Transforming Homework to Home Learning - The Learner's Way - 40 views

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    A recent strategy to alter the negative image that homework has built is to re-brand it as "home learning". But is this enough and if we are going to "get it right" what do we need to change besides the name?
Martin Burrett

UKEd Podcast - Episode 04 - Psychological Pressure - 7 views

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    "In this episode we explore some research published by Dr Stephen Earl from the University of Kent in England that is expected to help teachers identify specific reasons for different types of pupil withdrawal in the classroom.
    Read more about the research at ukedchat.com/2017/04/26/teenage…ive-psychological/

    Also, Richard Rogers shares some great classroom activities and ideas about differentiation -

    The accompanying blog post is at ukedchat.com/2017/04/25/differe…iation-magic-tool/

    Get in touch with us via podcast@ukedchat.com and follow us on Twitter @UKEdPodcast, or Direct Message us via the @UKEdChat  accounts on Twitter or Facebook."
Nigel Coutts

Five Great Reads - The Learner's Way - 38 views

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    One of the great joys and best strategies for expanding your understanding is to engage with a great book. Fortunately the options available today are immense and electronic options and audio books make access easy and possible wherever you may be. Here is a short list of what I have been reading lately with some brief reflections. 
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