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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Sharin Tebo

Sharin Tebo

JOLT - Journal of Online Learning and Teaching - 62 views

  • All of them responded that Twitter allows them to build connections with educators beyond those in their immediate vicinity. These connections are purposefully made as a way to find and share resources and to provide and receive support. For example, Participant 8 stated, “My primary purpose is to connect with other teachers, so that I can learn from them and share resources that I find.” Similarly, Participant 9 wrote, “I am the only biology teacher at my school. I use it [Twitter] as a means of obtaining advice, resources and collaboration…I also use it to find out about new tech tools.”
  • Twitter has helped me to build a strong professional reputation
  • they follow educators. They also follow content experts and others who share professional interests.
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  • Participants explained that they choose to follow people who are open, positive, and constructive.
  • “If their tweets seem to be of interest - providing ideas or resources, as opposed to just opinion - I will network with them.” Similarly, Participant 6 stated, “I look for people who interact and don't just post links.”
  • those they trust
  • Survey results show that nine out of ten of the respondents were able to give concrete examples of collaboration that occurred with fellow Twitter users.
  • Since Twitter is considered to be a social networking website, one aspect of this study looked at dialogue that transpired between followers to show evidence of collaborative conversations rather than unidirectional sharing of information.
  • These examples included ideas such as creating units, sharing of resources, students collaborating on projects between classrooms, exchanging professional materials and readings, writing book chapters, and even co-presenting at conferences.
  • beyond 140-character messages. That teachers moved discussions to forums that allow for deeper discussion and expansion of ideas is encouraging; Twitter does not seem to be a place to collaborate in depth, but rather to make those initial connections - a "jumping off" point.
  • how using Twitter has benefited them professionally. Four unique themes emerged from their responses: Access to resources Supportive relationships Increased leadership capacity Development of a professional vision
  • practical resources and ideas as a benefit.
  • opportunities for them to take leadership roles in developing professional development, organizing conferences, publishing, and grant writing.
  • This research study provides new insight into how teachers use social networking sites such as Twitter for professional purposes.
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    Impacts of Twitter on professional lives
Sharin Tebo

New Blog Series: Promising Policies for Personalized Learning - iNACOL - 15 views

  • How might policymakers remove barriers and support enabling conditions for optimizing learning for each student’s unique needs — both inside and outside of classroom walls?
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      That is the KEY question, as teachers don't have control over systems' barriers and policies. 
  • Personalized learning is tailoring learning for each student’s strengths, needs and interests — including enabling student voice and choice in what, how, when and where they learn — to provide flexibility and supports to ensure mastery of the highest standards possible.
  • According to this RAND study, students attending schools using breakthrough, personalized learning models “made gains in mathematics and reading over the past two years that were significantly greater than a comparison group made up of similar students selected from comparable schools.”
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  • Redefine courses and Carnegie units into competencies.
  • Build educator capacity and professional judgement in calibration on assessing evidence on common performance tasks
Sharin Tebo

Creating a Culture of Inquiry | Edutopia - 78 views

  • Inquiry
  • creating a culture of inquiry takes constant work. Teachers need to establish it from the first day in the classroom, and work to keep it vital throughout the year. Here are some important things to know about creating that culture, and some ideas that you might consider.
  • Culture
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  • Questioning
  • When we make a change or set an expectation for how a classroom will operate, we begin to affect the climate. It takes time for something to become a part of the culture
  • culture of inquiry
  • Scaffold
  • A culture of inquiry will not happen overnight, but the right climate for it is much easier to establish.
  • Teachers should use a variety of strategies, such as structured protocols and question starters and stems, to support students in asking effective questions.
  • One great tool for building a culture of inquiry is essential questions that drive learning.
  • Rather than focusing on the answer, they should focus on the process of inquiry that begins when the question is asked.
  • we have to make sure that our assignments also mirror and honor inquiry
  • Do our assignments focus on complexity and justification? Do we honor student voice and choice in these assignments? Are students allowed choice in what they produce and voice in what the assignment will look like? Do we create assignments and assessments that allow students to investigate their own questions aligned to the content that we want them to learn?
  • A culture of inquiry can only become the classroom norm if there is commitment from all stakeholders -- parents, students, teachers, administration, and more. Simply saying that we are an inquiry-based classroom and doing an occasional inquiry-based activity is not indicative of a culture of inquiry.
Sharin Tebo

20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback to Your Students ~ Educational Technology and Mob... - 215 views

  • Utilize this strategy when grading papers or tests. This strategy allows you the necessary time to provide quality, written feedback.
  • Alternate due dates for your students/classes.
  • Educate students on how to give feedback to each other.
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  • Model for students what appropriate feedback looks like and sounds like.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Gradual Release of Responsibility: Student learns to do heavy lifting
  • Ask another adult to give feedback.
  •  
    20 tips for effective feedback -- ESPECIALLY #4 & 9
Sharin Tebo

5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback | Edutopia - 85 views

  • providing students with meaningful feedback can greatly enhance learning and improve student achievement.
  • feedback
  • here are five research-based tips for providing students with the kind of feedback that will increase motivation, build on existing knowledge, and help them reflect on what they've learned.
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  • feedback is most effective when it is given immediately
  • researchers suggest taking the time to provide learners with information on what exactly they did well, and what may still need improvement. They also note that it can be helpful to tell the learner what he is doing differently than before.
  • Sooner the Better
  • Specific
  • the researchers found that participants who were given immediate feedback showed a significantly larger increase in performance than those who had received delayed feedback.
  • Advancement Toward a Goal
  • it should be clear to students how the information they are receiving will help them progress toward their final goal.
  • Involve Learners in the Process
  • When students have access to this information, they develop an awareness of their learning, and are more easily able to recognize mistakes and eventually develop strategies for tackling weak points themselves.
Sharin Tebo

The Importance of Low-Stakes Student Feedback | ASSESSMENT | MindShift | KQED News - 62 views

  • culture of learning” instead of a “culture of earning.”
  • Creating that kind of culture isn’t easy, but Bull continually goes back to formative assessment as the key.
  • “I find that formative assessment tends to be the most important aspect of a learning assessment plan,” he said. “It has the most impact on a student’s learning.”
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  • grade-less report card, where words like “outstanding” or “needs improvement” are used in place of letter or number grades.
  • digital or paper portfolios that display a collection of student work. “It’s a very reflective process,” said Bull. It works best if students analyze their own body of work
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    Low-Stakes Student Feedback & Assessment
Sharin Tebo

Guide: Using the SAMR Model to Guide Learning | That #EdTech Guy's Blog - 74 views

  • The SAMR Model (above) was developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura. It enables educators to analyse how effective their use of technology is on teaching and learning.
  • – Enhancement (Substitution and Augmentation) – technology is used just to enhance a task
  • – Transformation (Modification and Redefinition) – tasks are designed in a way which would not be possible without the use of technology
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  • Substitution – at this stage, technology is simply used as an alternative tool for completing the original task with no real change in the tasks function.
  • Example: instead of writing by hand, learners use an app like Pages to type up a report.
  • Example: once again, if students are creating a document on Pages, using the collaborative tools available on iWork for iCloud, learners can work on a document together. Peers could add feedback comments to the document in real time which could be responded to, which would improve the end product further.
  • Augmentation – here, technology is still used as a direct substitute like above, however it offers improvements in terms of the function of the task.
  • Example: again using Pages, however making use of features like spellchecking function or importing images to enhance the end product.
  • Modification – it is at this point where technology starts to enhance teaching and learning. It requires tasks to be redesigned, in order to make the most of the technology available.
  • it still does not improve the students learning experience.
  • Redefinition– this is the point at which technology really enhances the learning experience for students and has the greatest impact. Through the use of technology, educators are able to design tasks that were previously impossible.
  • Example: like before, learners may be collaborating on a document in Pages. However, this time the end product will be uploaded to a website or perhaps a class blog. Students are usually excited by the prospect of their work being on display in a classroom, so the use of a real audience is huge for them. Furthermore, this builds their literacy skills as they need to consider the audience that they’ll be writing to and adapt their work accordingly. Finally, this opens up the possibility of feedback from this global audience which they can respond to.
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    SAMR Explained with Definitions and Application Examples
Sharin Tebo

Education in the United States and Finland: What is and what can be | CTQ - 35 views

  • The simple answer is this: Finland’s cultural values and priorities are manifested in its system of education: “to guarantee all people…equal opportunities and rights to culture, free quality education, and prerequisites for full citizenship.”
  • Finland aims to uplift everyone in society; in Finland’s case, this vision can be achieved by providing equitable access to education and other social benefits. 
  • Finnish students do not begin their formalized education until the age of 7, standardized testing is unheard of in the formative years, and autonomy and play are encouraged throughout the curriculum.
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  • At the foundation of Finnish educational success are two core values: trust and equity. 
  • Finland’s educational system had become more decentralized and decision-making occurred at the local level.
  • local autonomy
  • Constraints on control and standardization facilitated greater flexibility, freedom, and the teaching profession became more supported, trusted, and respected.
  • Love of Learning
  • growth
  • relationships
  • personalized learning
  • n such a climate, adult stakeholders ostensibly trust one another, causing classroom environments to be less controlling and more collaborative in nature. 
  • With trust and equity as twin pillars of the educational system, it is unsurprising that Finland is able to focus on learning processes for civic engagement and development rather than on expending unnecessary energy for checklists, data, and oversight. 
  • Too many of our communities, schools, and students remain constrained and marginalized by poverty, lack of access, and limited opportunities.  Too many of us are focused on extrinsic motivators that inevitably lead to competition, compliance, expediency, sanctions, disengagement, and a diminished love of learning. 
  • “we’re measuring a lot of things in education today,” and wondered, “how are we measuring care?” 
  • perhaps we should be focusing less on Finnish education and more on the cultural values and conditions that make it possible.
Sharin Tebo

5 Reasons Why Reading Conferences Matter - Especially in High School English | Three Te... - 57 views

  • Reading Conferences
  • Every child needs one-on-one conversations with an adult as often as possible.
  • One way to show our adolescent students that we care is to talk with them. And face-to-face conversations about books and reading is a pretty safe way to do so, not to mention that we model authentic conversations about reading when we do.
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  • The more we grow in empathy, the better relationship we’ll have with our friends, our families and all other people we associate with — at least the idealist in me will cling to that hope as I continue to talk to students about books and reading.
  • circles about engagement.
  • Try questions like: How’s it going? (Thanks, Carl Anderson) Why did you choose this book? Do you know anyone else who has read this book? What’d she think? How’d you find the time to read this week? What’s standing in the way of your reading time?
  • Try questions like: What character reminds you of yourself or someone you know? What part of the story is the most similar/different to your life? Why do you think the author makes that happen in the book? What does he want us to learn about life? How does this story/character/conflict/event make you think about life differently?
  • when I take the time to talk to each student individually, and reinforce the skill in a quick chat, the application of that skill some how seeps into their brains much deeper.
  • Try questions like: Tell me about _____ that we learned in class today. How does that relate to your book/character? Remember when we learned _____, tell me how/where you see that in your book. Think about when we practiced ___, where does the author do that in your book? You’ve improved with ___, how could you use that skill for _______?
  • We must provide opportunities for our students to grow into confident and competent readers and writers in order to handle the rigor and complexity of post high school education and beyond. We must remember to focus on literacy not on the literature
  • We must validate our readers, ask questions that spark confidence, avoid questions that demean or make the student defensive, and at the same time challenge our readers into more complex texts.
  • Try questions like: On a scale of 1 to 10 how complex is this book for you? Why? What do you do when the reading gets difficult? Of all the books you’ve read this year, which was the most challenging? Why? How’s it going finding vocabulary for your personal dictionary? Tell me how you are keeping track of the parallel storyline?
  • I ask students about their confidence levels in our little chats, and they tell me they know they have grown as a readers. This is the best kind of reward.
  • Try questions like: How has your confidence grown as you’ve read this year? What do you think is the one thing we’ve done in class that’s helped you improve so much as a reader? How will the habits you’ve created in class help you in the reading you’ll have to do in college? Why do you think you’ve grown so much as a reader the past few weeks? What’s different for you now in the way you learn than how you learned before? Describe for me the characteristics you have that make you a reader.
  • What kinds of questions work for you in your reading conferences?
Sharin Tebo

What Makes a Question Essential? - 88 views

  • So, what makes a question "essential"?
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      This is really interesting to me as I learn about EQs.
  • When and why should we estimate?
  • Essential
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  • Makes a Question Essential?
Sharin Tebo

Could Rubric-Based Grading Be the Assessment of the Future? | MindShift | KQED News - 6 views

  • rubric-based alternative
  • First, they set out to define the essential learning outcomes that faculty, employers and accreditors saw as important.
  • The faculty worked together to write rubrics (called
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  • They went through norming sessions where each person would score a piece of student work using the rubric, and they’d come together to make sure people were assigning a similar grade.
  • formative feedback
  • body of evidence
  • cross-disciplinary
  • authentic work
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    Moving to a rubric-based system in University
Sharin Tebo

5 Reasons Why Origami Improves Students' Skills | Edutopia - 59 views

  • origami
  • This art form engages students and sneakily enhances their skills -- including improved spatial perception and logical and sequential thinking.
  • Here are some ways that origami can be used in your classroom to improve a range of skills:
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  • Geometry
  • According to the National Center for Education Statistics in 2003, geometry was one area of weakness among American students.
  • Origami has been found to strengthen an understanding of geometric concepts, formulas, and labels, making them come alive.
  • Thinking Skills
  • Origami excites other modalities of learning. It has been shown to improve spatial visualization skills using hands-on learning.
  • Fractions
  • Folding paper can demonstrate the fractions in a tactile way.
  • Problem Solving
  • Often in assignments, there is one set answer and one way to get there. Origami provides children an opportunity to solve something that isn't prescribed and gives them a chance to make friends with failure (i.e. trial and error).
  • Origami is a fun way to explain physics concepts. A thin piece of paper is not very strong, but if you fold it like an accordion it will be.
  • Researchers have found that students who use origami in math perform better.
  • STEAM
  • While schools are still catching up to the idea of origami as a STEAM engine (the merging of these disciplines), origami is already being used to solve tough problems in technology.
  • Additionally, the National Science Foundation, one of the government's largest funding agencies, has supported a few programs that link engineers with artists to use origami in designs. The ideas range from medical forceps to foldable plastic solar panels.
Sharin Tebo

Building Attention Span - The New York Times - 75 views

  • ou toggle over to check your phone during even the smallest pause in real life. You feel those phantom vibrations even when no one is texting you. You have trouble concentrating for long periods.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      This is a connection for me to the technology and devices article we read today and did a quotation mingle around during our Disciplinary Literacy Institute. No kidding that we get a shot of dopamine or 'high' when our phone goes ding, or it vibrates. 
  • Online life is so delicious
  • You live in a state of perpetual anticipation because the next social encounter is just a second way.
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  • xpert online gamers have a great capacity for short-term memory, to process multiple objects simultaneously, to switch flexibly between tasks and to quickly process rapidly presented information.
  • Fluid intelligence
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      I've never heard this before!
  • Research at the University of Oslo and elsewhere suggests that people read a printed page differently than they read off a screen. They are more linear, more intentional, less likely to multitask or browse for keywords.
  • Crystallized intelligence
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Something else i have never heard of.
  • Crystallized intelligence accumulates over the years and leads ultimately to understanding and wisdom.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      So maybe this kind of intelligence, then, is the "learning is a consequence of thinking"?
Sharin Tebo

Making the Most Out of Teacher Collaboration | Edutopia - 42 views

  • Collaboration
  • collaborate
  • effective teacher collaboration
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  • the attitude of professional privacy is not conducive to professional development
  • Build relationships Observe the best Ask questions Share Come prepared
  • preparation sparks much deeper conversation, more complete answers and better solutions. For informal collaborations, before I attempted to try out any new idea, I would ask one of my esteemed colleagues what they thought of it. In terms of assessments, the easiest way to improve the validity of the assessment is to have a colleague or group of colleagues review it.
  • develop a list of "how to" and "why for" questions regarding student data, instruction, discipline, etc.
  • bring my list of questions pertinent to the agenda in order to pick the groups' collective brain for answers.
  • one of the reasons that schools do not improve as fast as we would like them to is that when teachers get together for a purpose, rarely has research been done by the teachers, neither have ideas been mapped out prior to the meeting.
  • teachers, when it comes to their performance in the classroom, tend to stick to themselves.
  • Personal Steps to Effective Collaboration
  •  
    Collaboration: Build relationships, observe the best, ask questions, share, come prepared
Sharin Tebo

ISTE | Build student-centered learning the right way - 43 views

  • when you ask Tiarra Bell, a rising senior at Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia, what student-centered learning means to her, she doesn’t mention a word about tools and software. Instead, she embraces school because “the teachers are human and care about your life.”
  • Bell prefers projects over standardized tests “because those don’t show what I can do or who I am
  • Let the students own the classroom.
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  • she encourages her students to move desks, sit on the floor, change the physical environment every day if they like.
  • Lean on the kids to tell the community about their schools.
  • He’s not above using the substitute teacher budget to fill classrooms with instructors for a half day to give his full-time educational staff time for these discussions.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      I think this approach has been used in our school district in some cases. Creative!
  • Understand you are asking for a paradigm shift.
  • In a student-centered learning classroom, the teacher doesn’t have to know everything. It’s OK for students to teach each other
  • The students themselves can be your most enthusiastic ambassadors showing how powerful learning is shaping their lives.
  • Ask technology to do the heavy lifting.
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    Student-centered learning
Sharin Tebo

Share "Feedforward," Not Feedback | Edutopia - 51 views

  • Feedback, by its very definition, is focused on the past, which can't be changed. Feedforward looks ahead at future possibilities that still fall under our control. Feedback tends to reinforce personal stereotypes or negative self-fulfilling prophecies. Feedforward looks beyond what is in favor of what can be.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      What do we think of this concept? Feedforward is a new word and a new idea for me. Others' thoughts?
  • With feedforward, those ideas come from the very person being asked to change, increasing the odds that change will occur.
  • job-embedded PD
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Job-embedded PD--that is new to me, but it makes sense!
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  • Change belongs in the hands of the teacher.
  • Deployed by districts or contracted by individual schools, instructional coaches live alongside the faculty and provide on-the-job support to teams of teachers.
  • Peer Observations and Teacher Rounds
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      This is happening in some sites I support in my District. I am hoping to bring that to life even more to improve vertical alignment and strengthen the horizontal alignment in course-alikes. 
  • PLCs bring together teachers with shared interests and goals for frequent discussion about and analysis of teaching practices.
Sharin Tebo

Newsela | French educational inequality results in government shake-up - 19 views

shared by Sharin Tebo on 02 Jun 15 - No Cached
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      how many of you use Diigo with your students?
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