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Matti Narkia

Vitamin D replacement in Asians with diabetes may increase insulin resistance. - 0 views

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    Vitamin D replacement in Asians with diabetes may increase insulin resistance.
    Taylor AV, Wise PH.
    Postgrad Med J. 1998 Jun;74(872):365-6.
    PMID: 9799895

    We report three cases of vitamin D replacement in British Asians with vitamin D deficiency and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In all cases, replacement resulted in an increase in insulin resistance and a deterioration of glycaemic control
Matti Narkia

Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes - 0 views

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    "Aug. 31, 2009 -- Eating a Mediterranean-style diet may help people with type 2 diabetes keep their disease under control without drugs better than following a typical low-fat diet.

    A new study from Italy shows that people with type 2 diabetes who ate a Mediterranean diet rich in vegetables and whole grains with at least 30% of daily calories from fat (mostly olive oil) were better able to manage their disease without diabetes medications than those who ate a low-fat diet with no more than 30% of calories from fat (with less than 10% coming from saturated fat choices).

    After four years, researchers found that 44% of people on the Mediterranean diet ended up requiring diabetes medications to control their blood sugars compared with 70% of those who followed the low-fat diet.

    It's one of the longest-term studies of its kind, and researchers, including Katherine Esposito, MD, of the Second University of Naples, say the results "reinforce the message that benefits of lifestyle interventions should not be overlooked.""
Matti Narkia

Effects of a Mediterranean-Style Diet on the Need for Antihyperglycemic Drug Therapy in... - 0 views

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    Effects of a Mediterranean-style diet on the need for antihyperglycemic drug therapy in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: a randomized trial.
    Esposito K, Maiorino MI, Ciotola M, Di Palo C, Scognamiglio P, Gicchino M, Petrizzo M, Saccomanno F, Beneduce F, Ceriello A, Giugliano D.
    Ann Intern Med. 2009 Sep 1;151(5):306-14. Erratum in: Ann Intern Med. 2009 Oct 20;151(8):591.
    PMID: 19721018

    Conclusion: Compared with a low-fat diet, a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean-style diet led to more favorable changes in glycemic control and coronary risk factors and delayed the need for antihyperglycemic drug therapy in overweight patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.
Matti Narkia

Low-Carb and Mediterranean Diets Beat Low-Fat for Weight Loss, Lipid Changes at 2 Years... - 0 views

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    July 16, 2008 - Both a low-carbohydrate diet or a Mediterranean-style diet may be "effective alternatives" to a low-fat diet, with more favorable effects on lipids and/or glycemic control, new research suggests [1]. The two-year study, which managed to keep almost 85% of the 322 study participants on one of the three diets for the entire period, offers the hope that weight-loss diets can be tailored to personal preferences, without sacrificing efficacy, researchers say.

    "Several recent one-year dietary studies have led the American Diabetes Association to state in January 2008 that low-carb diets should be considered for a maximum of one year," lead author on the study, Dr Iris Shai (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel), told heartwire . "The current two-year study suggests that one low-fat diet doesn't fit all, meaning that the old paradigm should be reconsidered."

    Shai and colleagues publish the results of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) in the July 17, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine
Matti Narkia

Low-carb and Mediterranean diets beat low-fat for weight-loss, lipid changes at two yea... - 0 views

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    July 16, 2008 | Shelley Wood
    Beer-Sheva, Israel - Both a low-carbohydrate diet or a Mediterranean-style diet may be "effective alternatives" to a low-fat diet, with more favorable effects on lipids and/or glycemic control, new research suggests [1]. The two-year study, which managed to keep almost 85% of the 322 study participants on one of the three diets for the entire period, offers the hope that weight-loss diets can be tailored to personal preferences, without sacrificing efficacy, researchers say.

    "Several recent one-year dietary studies have led the American Diabetes Association to state in January 2008 that low-carb diets should be considered for a maximum of one year," lead author on the study, Dr Iris Shai (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel), told heartwire. "The current two-year study suggests that one low-fat diet doesn't fit all, meaning that the old paradigm should be reconsidered."

    Shai and colleagues publish the results of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) in the July 17, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Weight Loss with a Low-Carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or Low-Fat Diet - 0 views

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    Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet.
    Shai I, Schwarzfuchs D, Henkin Y, Shahar DR, Witkow S, Greenberg I, Golan R, Fraser D, Bolotin A, Vardi H, Tangi-Rozental O, Zuk-Ramot R, Sarusi B, Brickner D, Schwartz Z, Sheiner E, Marko R, Katorza E, Thiery J, Fiedler GM, Blüher M, Stumvoll M, Stampfer MJ; Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) Group.
    N Engl J Med. 2008 Jul 17;359(3):229-41.
    PMID: 18635428

    Conclusions Mediterranean and low-carbohydrate diets may be effective alternatives to low-fat diets. The more favorable effects on lipids (with the low-carbohydrate diet) and on glycemic control (with the Mediterranean diet) suggest that personal preferences and metabolic considerations might inform individualized tailoring of dietary interventions. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00160108 [ClinicalTrials.gov] .)
Matti Narkia

Effects of a Mediterranean-Style Diet on the Need for Antihyperglycemic Drug Therapy in... - 0 views

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    Effects of a Mediterranean-style diet on the need for antihyperglycemic drug therapy in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: a randomized trial.
    Esposito K, Maiorino MI, Ciotola M, Di Palo C, Scognamiglio P, Gicchino M, Petrizzo M, Saccomanno F, Beneduce F, Ceriello A, Giugliano D.
    Ann Intern Med. 2009 Sep 1;151(5):306-14.
    PMID: 19721018

    Conclusion: Compared with a low-fat diet, a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean-style diet led to more favorable changes in glycemic control and coronary risk factors and delayed the need for antihyperglycemic drug therapy in overweight patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D and diabetes: Improvement of glycemic control with vitamin D3 repletion -- Sc... - 0 views

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    Vitamin D and diabetes: improvement of glycemic control with vitamin D3 repletion.
    Schwalfenberg G.
    Can Fam Physician. 2008 Jun;54(6):864-6.
    PMID: 18556494

    Conclusion

    These cases support information that is already known about VTD and its effect on the islet cell. As discussed above, this might be true only for vitamin D3 and not vitamin D2, although vitamin D2 has been shown to improve bone health. Vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency is common, and repletion might improve glycemic control early in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is one of the fastest growing chronic diseases worldwide. Vitamin D3 is inexpensive and readily available. Well-designed clinical studies are required to ascertain if improving 25(OH)D levels from an insufficiency or deficiency to sufficiency improves glycemic control in diabetes. These studies need to be properly designed: a randomized controlled trial with VTD deficiency or insufficiency identified in diabetic patients of various ethnic
Matti Narkia

Response -- Schwalfenberg 53 (9): 1435 -- Canadian Family Physician - 0 views

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    Vitamin D supplementation.
    Eveleigh B.
    Can Fam Physician. 2007 Sep;53(9):1435; author reply 1435.
    PMID: 17872869

    My concern regarding vitamin D2 is that it is a synthetic analogue and might interact with the vitamin D receptor differently in various cell systems. It has been reported that vitamin D3 might improve glycemic control.7 Vitamin D2 has been reported to cause worsening of glycemic control in people of East Indian descent.8 Is this because of vitamin D receptor polymorphism, or because of enhanced 24-hydroxylase enzyme activation, or is it due to how vitamin D2 interacts with the receptor? Until this has been sorted out, I feel safest using vitamin D3. There are about 2000 synthetic analogues of vitamin D. The search is on for one that can cross the blood-brain barrier to treat certain types of brain cancers without causing hypercalcemia.9 But then again, what other effects would this compound have? There are still so many unknowns
Matti Narkia

Dietary cis-monounsaturated fatty acids and metabolic control in type 2 diabetes -- Ros... - 0 views

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    Dietary cis-monounsaturated fatty acids and metabolic control in type 2 diabetes.
    Ros E.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):617S-625S. Review.
    PMID: 12936956
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