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Nigel Coutts

Shaping the Curriculum - Exploring Integration - The Learner's Way - 17 views

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    After two days of talking about curriculum, integration, STEM, STEAM and HASS I am left with more questions than I started with. In some respects, the concept of curriculum integration is simple. It is after all something that Primary teachers almost take for granted. But for Senior and Tertiary educators the question of curriculum integration is inherently complex. At all levels questions emerge of what curriculum integration might achieve, what purposes it serves, what it could and should look like and how it should be supported by curriculum planners. In the current climate, with its debate around the role of education within an innovation economy, shaped by technology and confronting demands for a STEAM enabled workforce the shape of our curriculum is under pressure. 
Michele Rosen

Home - www.TeachEngineering.org - 54 views

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    "CURRICULUM FOR K-12 TEACHERS
    Standards-aligned engineering lessons and hands-on activities
    for use in science, engineering, and math classrooms"
Deborah Baillesderr

SAS® Curriculum Pathways® - 23 views

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    "Interactive, standards-based resources in the core disciplines."
Steve Kelly

What would an exceptional middle and high school computer science curriculum include? -... - 48 views

  • What would an exceptional middle and high school computer science curriculum include?
  • This isn't a complete answer, but one thing the very first introductory classes should require is that the students turn off all their electronic computers and actually learn to walk through  algorithms with a computer that exists only on paper. (Or, I suppose, a whiteboard or a simulator.) This exercise would give the students a grounding in what is going on inside the computer as a very low level.

    My first computer programming class in my Freshman year of high school was completely on paper. Although it was done because the school didn't have much money, it turned out to be very beneficial.

    Another class I had in high school, that wouldn't normally be lumped into a Computer Science curriculum but has been a boon to my career, was good old Typing 101.
  • If you followed the CS Unplugged curriculum your students would know more about CS than most CS grads:

    http://csunplugged.org

    It's a really great intro to basic computer science concepts and very easy for students to understand.  Best of all you don't even need a computer per student if your school doesn't have the budget,
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  • For younger students, I think that the ability to make something professional-looking, like a real grown-up would, is paramount.  Sadly, I think this means that LOGO and BASIC aren't much use any more*.
  • So, we have a few choices.  You can try to write phone apps that look just like real phone apps, design interactive websites that look just like real interactive websites, or do something with embedded systems / robotics.  Avoid the temptation to make these things into group projects; the main thing every student needs to experience is the process of writing code, running it, debugging it, and watching the machine react to every command.
  • It is important to consider what an 11 to 18-year old is familiar with in terms of mathematics and logical thinking. An average 11-year old is probably learning about fractions, simple cartesian geometry, the concept of units, and mathematical expressions. By 15, the average student will be taking algebra, and hopefully will have the all-important concept of variables under his/her belt. So much in CS is dependent on solid understanding that symbols and tokens can represent abstract concepts, values, or algorithms. Without it, it's still possible to teach CS, but it must be done in a very different way (see Scratch).
  • At this point, concepts such as variables, parenthesis matching, and functions (of the mathematical variety) are within easy reach. Concepts like parameter passing, strings and collections, and program flow should be teachable. More advanced concepts such as recursion, references and pointers, certain data structures, and big-O may be very difficult to teach without first going through some more foundational math.
  • I tend to agree strongly with those that believe a foundational education should inspire interest and enforce concepts and critical thinking over teaching any specific language, framework, system, or dogma.
  • The key is that the concepts in CS aren't just there for the hell of it. Everything was motivated by a real problem, and few things are more satisfying than fixing something you really want to work with a cool technique or concept you just learned.
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    Great resource for teachers (especially those of us not initially trained in Computer Science) about what should 'count' as Computer Science.  Worth the read!
Glenn Hervieux

After 12 Years of Teaching Writing…an Epiphany! | Catlin Tucker, Honors Engli... - 66 views

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    "I've been teaching students how to write for 12 years, but this week I had a realization that made me question the purpose of writing in school." Catlin Tucker brings up some important points to consider in the writing process and her own process as a teacher.
Glenn Hervieux

California's new normal: In the fourth year of drought, dusty cars and no iced water ar... - 23 views

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    Great informational text for students - discussion and literacy across the curriculum.
caroline Kuhn

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/388838/GCE_AS... - 3 views

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    The 2016 math changes for GCSE and A levels
BalancEd Tech

12 Mistakes Schools Make When Introducing The Next Big Thing - 5 views

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    Wiggins
Glenn Hervieux

50 Ways to Teach With Current Events - NYTimes.com - 49 views

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    Current events are a powerful medium to engage students and their thinking in so many different ways. Here are 50 to get you started!
danthomander

http://www.mathlearningcenter.org/sites/default/files/documents/McTighe_Wiggins_CCSS.pdf - 24 views

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    Nice article defining standards and curriculum and mapping the connections between them. Gives five "big ideas" for converting from the CCSS to a curriculum effectively.
Roland Gesthuizen

GANAG - Lesson Planning - janeepollock.squarespace.com - 81 views

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    "GANAG is the acronym for a 21st century daily lesson planning schema created by Jane E. Pollock who updated the ubiquitous Master Teacher schema by Madeline C. Hunter. " 
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