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lsjohnson

How Can Technology Be Beneficial in a Kindergarten Class? | Everyday Life - Global Post - 0 views

  • Some teachers have replaced math workbooks with electronic tablet programs that give children immediate feedback and free the teacher to reach those children who need one-on-one help.
  • Students are at various levels of understanding in core subject areas and it’s not always an easy task for kindergarten teachers to consistently assess each child’s strengths and weaknesses.
  • Early childhood education consists of lots of hands-on projects. Teachers can document their students’ progress by taking pictures with a digital camera. These photos serve as illustrations of the children’s accomplishments and assessments of their growth. Explanations students give at a smart board can also be kept in a digital portfolio. The portfolios can be shared with families at conferences and given to the next year’s teacher as a point of reference.
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  • When a group of kindergarten students listens to a recorded book or works together at the smart board to match letters and sounds, they are learning the valuable skill of working together. When four or five students gather around a smart table, they can join forces in activities such as dragging word names to their matching numbers. Two students sitting together at a computer to determine living and nonliving things on a science program learn to cooperate.
  • While technology doesn’t take the place of vital, developmental play and hands-on learning, it adds to them, reinforcing traditional methods of teaching.
  •  
    the benefits of technology in kindergarten
anonymous

Kindergarten: The Changes from Play to Work | Educ 300: Education Reform, Past and Present - 0 views

  • argue that kindergarten has changed from encouraging play in the classrooms, to instead, encouraging work. When the kindergarten model was adopted in the United States, kindergarten’s purpose was to prepare children for their academic future and to promote their natural development. Today, the kindergarten model has shifted and promotes academic learning, as a result of our economy and the emphasis of education.
  • Before kindergarten transformed to being academic-focused, kindergarten’s curriculum was based on the teacher’s discretion. The classrooms were play-focused because children learn the most through playing with their peers; in Froebel’s opinion, what children learn when they are playing is vital for their natural development and success later in school (Jeynes 2006).
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    Benefits of play
anonymous

Digital Is - 0 views

  • ell, the struggles paid off, and my kids are creating their very own digital writing to prove it. Kindergarten kids, with relatively little teacher support are making digital stories about why they love their families, who they are, and what the best parts of kindergarten are. These young writers are creating multimedia projects with such voice and such emotion about their families and themselves. They are passionately explaining the highlights of kindergarten so that next year’s class will know what to expect. The kids are creating iMovies and using a digital camera, scanner, or the Internet to add photos and, some times add video from a Flip video camera. These projects are created collaboratively with each student having his or her own part in the whole.
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    Technology in kindergarten
kathleenweyers

Implementation in an Elementary Classroom (Articles) - 0 views

  • the children “do science.”
    • ecsexton1
       
      Will the students be taught how theorize, test, analyze, or experiment? Or without telling the students this is what they are already doing? Is there any pre-teaching to the unit about rocks or exploring on their own?
    • rmeyer1130
       
      It seems like in large group sharing, the teacher would want to introduce those important terms. I wonder, too, if the rocks unit was in the curriculum or if it came up in classroom discussion as a new area to explore. When a band listening example led to a lot of student questions about African drums, I made sure to change some of my concert plans and found a new piece of music and utilized the expertise of one of our other band staff members to build on the kids' enthusiasm and inquiry.
  • nvite women
    • ecsexton1
       
      I think this is a great idea to invite scientists who are women! It makes the nation's stereotypes decrease and women in the science field increase.
    • katieconnolly20
       
      I also think this is a great idea. It is interesting in my classroom this past year as we were talking about community helpers.. we had a discussion of can a garbage man be a garbage woman and talked about different roles. It was so interesting that even at a young age some students have already stereotyped different jobs to different genders. I think that the more that students see the more they will be able to be interested in a subject and career. Science is something that is slowly fading and becoming less important in classrooms. It is important as educators to give our students these opportunities.
  • thinking about thinking
    • ecsexton1
       
      The way Mrs. Moore teaches makes sense to me. I can finally see how personalized learning can work without using computers and technology. I think some teachers in my building already do this without realizing that it is PL.
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  • helping children gain active control over the process of thinking so they learn how to learn, which will serve them well throughout their lives.
    • ecsexton1
       
      I think Personalized learning is easier to do in a classroom with science and social studies because they are more exploratory subjects compared to reading and math. Anybody have good ideas on how to make reading and math personalized without using technology?
    • efabscha
       
      I like this idea also. I feel like this is a skill that students will use all throughout their lives- at college, in real life, and in their careers.
    • kspedersen
       
      I love this. I believe that if students learn how to love the process of learning that they will continue on to be life long learners!!
    • rmeyer1130
       
      I love it, too! If kids are enjoying the process of learning, I think they're more willing to try new things and learn more even in areas that may not be their strengths.
  • Ms. Moore understands the reluctance of many other teachers of early grade students to employ this method because it requires “unlearning” many of the lessons of traditional teacher-preparation programs. She must, she says, continually resist the temptation to lead her students through lessons.
    • efabscha
       
      She is exactly right. Teachers have been taught to lead their students through lessons. This process is very uncomfortable for many of us as we have not been taught how to "teach" or "facilitate" this way.
    • rmeyer1130
       
      I think about this when we're always asked to post our learning targets for students. It seems counter productive to tell kids we're going to learn a certain skill when we want our students to discover the skill through the lesson we created... I have found that instead of telling kids fingerings on their instruments for new notes, if I lead them to the fingering chart, they get so excited about using their fingering chart to learn more than that one new note.
  • During this first instructional phase, noise and activity levels sometimes reach eardrum-piercing levels and
    • efabscha
       
      Many of us are not used to a lot of noise in the classroom either. Some students may struggle with a classroom that is overly loud. How do we ensure the noise level is comfortable for all to learn?
    • plsummer201
       
      The noise level during this phase should be stated in the rubric during discussion. I agree not everyone is immune to loud voices.
    • kspedersen
       
      This is something that I know I would/will struggle with when implementing personalized learning. I completely agree and believe that students should be conversing with one another...however, I struggle with all of them doing this at the same time. 25 voices going all at once is sometimes a lot to handle!..and something that I would learn to get used to :)
  • Most teachers know the classroom is the perfect place for children to play, but opportunities to provide those benefits are on the decline. Reduced recess, cuts to physical education
    • efabscha
       
      This really hits home for me as I have a daughter who was in PRE K (transitional kindergarten) last year and the preschool teachers are now required to implement so many minutes of reading/guided reading into their curriculum. Are these preschool aged children getting enough play/social time?
    • katieconnolly20
       
      It is scary that we are asking you're asking if preschool is getting enough time.. I hope so!!! They aren't even to elementary school yet. I am told time and time again that kindergarten is the new 1st grade. It seems that the more demands that are put on us as educators, the more play time we have to cut. I am lucky in a way that I have a team of teachers who refuses to give up that free time play at the end of the day. We believe it is so important. I am not sure how many more years we will get away with it but for now, we will let our students be little so that they can play and explore like they should!
    • kellijhall
       
      I always laugh when I share with parents that I learn so much from observing their kiddos playing games (either at recess or indoors). It is truly where they have more authentic experiences learning how to communicate and solve differences.
    • plsummer201
       
      What about developing the small muscles thru play-dough? In the last few years I have noticed that 3rd graders can barely hold a scissor properly and much less cut a simple figure.
    • plsummer201
       
      What about developing small motor skills thru play-dough? I have 3rd graders who can barely hold a scissor properly much less cut a simple figure.
    • kspedersen
       
      I firmly believe that students learn by playing!! There are ways to set-up classroom situations where students are playing but also digging into concepts as well!!
  • tudents who miss time to play miss opportunities to let their minds soar and connect the dots between what they do at their desks and what surrounds them in the world
    • katieconnolly20
       
      As a kindergarten teacher, I believe that that play is key to learning! This past year I was amazed at what my students were able to connect through play to what we were learning in the classroom. In my classroom, it is key to provide students with those opportunities to play and explore.
    • rmeyer1130
       
      Play IS key to learning! Especially when we can't assume our students are given opportunity to play and create and imagine with other kids outside of the school day.
  • But when you're staring out at 20 or 30 students as individual as snowflakes, you may find yourself asking that ever-daunting question: "How?"
    • katieconnolly20
       
      As good educators, we want to make sure that each of our students needs are met. The daunting question that we all ask is HOW?! How do we make each of our student feel cared for, important, and set them up for success? I continue to find it interesting how students have so many things that are similar and different about them. I think this article does a nice job of laying it out and showing what we can do between five minutes and five years!
  • when she answers students’ questions straightforwardly instead of asking questions to help the students find the answers themselves, she’s actually interfering with the learning process.
    • heidimeyer
       
      Yes!! I must remember this always! It's so easy to answer questions for students. However, if I keep questioning them, it will allow them to learn on their own.
    • annabrousard
       
      This is something that I am continually trying to work on. It is so easy to help a struggling student but your really are doing them a disservice.
  • encouraging and allowing students to discover fundamental principles on their own.
    • heidimeyer
       
      I'm a visual person and I know I like to "see" things for myself. Allowing our students to discover conclusions will be something that they will remember longer than if a teacher "told" them what happens.
    • anonymous
       
      Yes! I agree! As I read this I remember learning about gravity as Billy Nye threw objects off the top of a building... watching this video was better than listening to the fact ... but participating in the activity would be even better than the video.
  • free play is how children learn about themselves and the world around them. And, if they’re not playing, they’re not learning in all the ways that count most.
    • heidimeyer
       
      For the early childhood ages, this is key and missing in elementary schools. I'm saddened by how academic our kindergarten programs have become over the years.
  • A simple take-home survey can give you quick insights about a child's hobbies, interests, strengths, or struggles. Arts and electives teachers in your school could offer insight on certain students, as well.
    • heidimeyer
       
      I loved receiving a parent survey from our child's teacher at the beginning of the year. It was a great way to introduce our child with details he may have never shared with his teacher. What a great way to set up some personalization at the start of the year.
    • kellijhall
       
      I have been doing this since my first year and I love it! It gives me so much valuable information before I start to learn about them but I also feel like if gives the parent a space to let me know things they may not feel comfortable sharing in front of other people or their child.
    • rmeyer1130
       
      I do a parent survey at the beginning of band, and it really helps me get a feel for a family's background experience with band, and also what they're hoping for their kids for the year.
  • If you add and master just one at a time, refining the best techniques as you go, eventually you'll have a big arsenal.
    • heidimeyer
       
      I need to remember, this is a process! This statement validates that.
    • kellijhall
       
      This reminds me to only pick one thing to focus on at a time...which is so hard!
  • Thinking Maps, which help children categorize information in visually coherent ways
    • anonymous
       
      I remember in junior high being required to answer the essay/critical thinking questions of our science tests through the use of thinking maps. I didn't realize at the time how much it helped me organize my thoughts. I wonder how I can be begin applying them in my reading and math courses at the elementary level. Graphic organizers are so important to consolidate and organize information.
    • annabrousard
       
      I have never heard about Thinking Maps before. I explored the website and definitely see how this can be beneficial for children of all ages.
    • rmeyer1130
       
      Thinking maps! Kids love them and they're great tools for brainstorming and digging in to new learning
  • Share planning duties with a fellow teacher
    • anonymous
       
      This is so important! I love planning with gen. ed. teachers because often there are more students than just my IEP students that need the lower level differentiation in the gen. ed. setting. We don't need to reinvent the wheel, but work together to create shared resources. Our problem is, how do we create time to plan together on a weekly basis?
    • kellijhall
       
      We run into these same issues! We are five gen. ed. teachers but one of us coteaches with sped. and one of us with ELP. We also cluster group our students...and this is where we hit the wall. Our classroom make-ups are so different and our kids move at different paces. How do we work divide up the work and still respect the pacing in each others' rooms?
  • assigns each student a role within the group
  • a unique item of jewelry
    • anonymous
       
      What a fun conclusion to the unit!! I wonder how the teacher completes her summative assessment for the unit? The students have their journals but what does she use to prove that students have retained the information and met the state standards?
    • eswartzendruber
       
      As a 4th grade teacher, we work with rocks and minerals as well. It would be fun to create videos of their learning as a summative assessment. Students could also share the videos with their parents when they are finished!
  • when I supply an answer or even suggest a method for finding an answer, I’m not truly helping.”
    • eswartzendruber
       
      It's so tempting to scaffold them to the right answer, but I realize that's not helping them be independent thinkers. I find that my students then rely on me to always be there to help them figure out the challenge.
    • plsummer201
       
      I agree but others need prompting to be able to focus on the right direction therefore differentiation is needed.
  • “Kids are not blank slates.”
    • eswartzendruber
       
      It's easy to assume this, but they've had years of being influenced by their peers already and are soaking in the information they hear. This might be from daycare/preschool or home.
    • kellijhall
       
      Agreed...not to mention home life, family make-up, and outside influences. They have preconceived notions when they walk through the door.
    • kspedersen
       
      Yes! What a simple, yet profound way to put it. I agree. No matter where a student comes from they do have a background. There is always something to build upon and connect with!
  • in their hearts they may not believe it.
    • eswartzendruber
       
      We must give them a chance to experiment with hands on learning opportunities.
  • “The first thing we do is begin an ‘I see — I wonder’ exercise,
    • rmeyer1130
       
      I teach in a school with a lot of focus on inquiry based learning, and it's amazing how the kids gain confidence with this kind of thinking and growing as the year goes on. When I play new music, I have kids record what they hear, what they think, and what they wonder. The class discussion leads us to a wonder that we can explore together, and modeling this as a teacher is important.
  • Plan assignments with choices.
    • rmeyer1130
       
      This is something we all do, and a great first step in individualized instruction!
  • her trust in the inquiry process is tested, when she must practice patience and restraint.
    • kathleenweyers
       
      The learning is probably remembered more if it is discovered by the learner.  It would take patience not to tell kids the answer!
  • Thinking Maps, she explains, help students gain control of the process by offering them eight distinct ways to organize their inquiries
    • kathleenweyers
       
      I think the Thinking Maps would add some method to the madness!  Love this idea and the variety of ways they can be used!
  • “I introduce one Thinking Map per week during the first eight weeks
    • kathleenweyers
       
      I appreciate the pragmatic approach to teaching these one at a time, one week at a time.  It seems that then it becomes second-nature, which is truly amazing!  Using thinking maps is a powerful tool for teaching children how to think and organize their thinking!
  • Play is, after all, the way children are wired to learn, especially in the preschool and kindergarten years.
    • kathleenweyers
       
      This reminds me of how kids learn technology or to play video games, by playing with them, by tinkering and trying things.  I think that is why kids are more advanced than many adults at using technology, because they have MORE time to "play" with it than adults do.
  • guided play is a good alternative.
    • kathleenweyers
       
      This would be like the math games in EveryDay Math.  Kids are playing games to learn and that learning is more memorable than a worksheet!
  • each procedure needs to be practiced 28 times to stick. When you introduce a new activity, such as independently listening to an audio book, give students enough practice to become adept at it
    • kathleenweyers
       
      28 times to learn a new procedure seems like a lot!  It makes me think I might want to slow it down a bit to let kids get adept at it!
lsjohnson

Kindergarten readiness: Is your child ready for school? | BabyCenter - 0 views

  • Experts say no single or simple factor determines whether a child is ready for kindergarten. Instead, a child's development needs to be evaluated on several fronts.
  • If he's in preschool, talk to the teacher. She probably has a good sense of his development and how he compares with other children who would be at his grade level.
  • Many public and most private schools use assessment tests to determine kindergarten readiness.
  •  
    Is your child ready for school?
lsjohnson

Your kindergartner and technology | GreatKids - 0 views

  • Technology isn’t a teaching substitute, but a valuable aid that introduces children to new ways of thinking and working.
  • Many states base their technology standards on the National Educational Technology Standards for Students. But because children aren’t tested on their use of technology, teachers are typically not held accountable for teaching them. That means technology use varies widely from classroom to classroom. Your kindergartner may have one or more computer workstations in the classroom, visit a computer lab once a week, or not use technology regularly at all.
  • To get the maximum benefit from technology, the best classrooms incorporate technology into regular lessons that develop students’ higher order thinking skills, promote creativity, and facilitate academic learning.
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  • Math concepts taught in class such as shapes and patterns can be extended with the use of technology. Your child may use draw and paint software programs to do a counting activity or create a pattern. He may use a computer template the teacher has created to group objects by attributes, such as size, color, and shape. Or he may be asked to extend a pattern, deciding which object comes next. Berthiaume notes: “The class may make a counting book using digital photos, numbers, and words.”
  • What you might see in a well-equipped classroom Educational software that reinforces reading and math skills Interactive story books on a computer One computer or more in the classroom with access to the Internet and a printer Large-screen display connected to a computer used by the teacher to demonstrate a technology lesson to the whole class (If none is available, the teacher may have smaller groups gather around the computer to introduce a lesson or technology skill.) An interactive whiteboard, which is an electronic writing surface that can capture writing electronically
  •  
    Technology benefits kindergarten learning
Amy Kolln

Kindergarten parent orientation - 0 views

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    Use at Parent Open House- Amy Kolln
anonymous

Technology can impact brain development in good, bad ways | 9news.com - 0 views

  • When young kids use technology, Small says it does strengthen information processing in the brain.
  • "The downside is, our face-to-face human contact skills; looking someone on the eye, noticing the emotional expression on a face; those neural wires are weakening," Small said.
  • That's why in Laurie Clark's classroom, you won't find any laptops or iPads. Instead, you'll find ribbons to braid, bread to make, and chalk art instead of white boards.
  •  
    Technology in kindergarten
LaRae Arment

"Personalized" vs. "Personal" Learning - 0 views

  • A personalized environment gives students the freedom to follow a meaningful line of inquiry, while building the skills to connect, synthesize and analyze information into original productions
    • arieux1
       
      While I wanted to highlight this entire paragraph, I thought this was the one that stuck out the most. This was a really concise way to describe personalization and I just wanted to note how directly this section of the article addressed the entire issue of what this really is.
    • julie_carroll
       
      Yes! This mantra can guide my new PBL course in the fall; writing it down now....
    • kathleenweyers
       
      Yes, this does fit with PBL!
  • Technology was strikingly absent from these conversations
    • arieux1
       
      This was surprising to me. When I think of personalization, I tend to include technology in it. This idea makes total sense, though, because if a student doesn't view tech as necessary or it isn't part of it, it shouldn't be forced.
    • ecsexton1
       
      I always picture personalized learning with technology too, but then I think about what is the point of teachers? Parents could just home school their kids. I'm still kind of confused about the teacher's role in personalized learning.
    • kellijhall
       
      Honestly, this makes me happy to hear because a lot of educators are quick to jump to technology without evaluating what is truly needed.
    • eswartzendruber
       
      I am also surprised by this. Society now demands that students understand how to use technology, and I think as teachers we feel pressured to use the latest and greatest website/tool in our classrooms. I agree with Jared that if it isn't necessary or the student wants to use different tools for his/her work, they should be able to.
    • heidimeyer
       
      This was shocking to me. Technology seems to be a huge part in every day learning for students. It's refreshing to know that it's not necessarily the best route to go.
    • jhenning40
       
      This surprises me as well; technology is such and integral and inescapable part of our lives, especially those of our students, that I would think this would be high on the list.
    • annabrousard
       
      I, too, was very surprised about how technology was absent. I guess it does make sense because if a student does not want to use technology then they do not have to. It would be totally up to them.
  • We don’t need personalization as much as we need to promote and give opportunities for our kids to do personal learning
    • arieux1
       
      I couldn't agree with this more. I think that a lot of personalization is actually allowing students to learn at their own pace, but in order through a prescribed curriculum. It may be more valuable to allow students to do some learning of what they want how they want.
    • ecsexton1
       
      How do you envision this working for you in your classroom? How do we get kids to do personal learning?
    • nthurm
       
      I think the key words are "promote and give opportunities for our kids to DO." At all levels, kids are going to have more success from doing instead of just recreating or reenacting someone else's work/ideas. This is something I have worked on improving every year since some of my very first lessons taught.
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  • having my students read the literature at home and come into class ready to discuss it
    • arieux1
       
      Haha! As a former ELA teacher, several of my colleagues and I argued this exact point a few years ago. That's funny.
    • efabscha
       
      This is still the expectation in many of our college classes!
    • rmeyer1130
       
      And in band, we have always lived with a model of teaching during small lesson groups and then assigning home practice to gain mastery of a skill. I spend valuable teaching minutes teaching home practice strategies and reflecting on those strategies at lessons. I want kids to set goals and practice the lessons on their own at home.
  • they’ll master a set of skills mandated by people who have never met them
  • skills are acquired sequentially
  • context
    • ecsexton1
       
      I'm concerned that teachers are not teaching enough deep learning in the general education classroom in grade K-4. There is so much focus on getting 120 minutes of reading but it mainly goes toward the daily 5 and not enough connected learning to the world. How do we incorporate deep learning into the daily 5?
    • kathleenweyers
       
      good question! One way might be reading multiple books/articles on the same topic. More cross-curricular including SS and SCI topics
    • kspedersen
       
      I agree! That this can be tricky. The Daily 5 is a model and teachers need to figure out how to fill the model with meaningful material that accesses the whole child. I like the idea above about integrating other subjects into the reading block and I actually think that the Daily 5 model is a good way to do that!
  • of what deep learning now requires in a connected world.
  • better test scores. And, if that’s what we value as the most important outcome of schooling,
    • ecsexton1
       
      I had terrible test scores as a child and I get test anxiety about if I have enough time to finish the test. How can educators think that test scores are the best outcome for students?
  • However, in order to navigate the system of accountability in the U.S. educational system, many school district leaders require public school educators to teach a specific curriculum that will be evaluated on standardized tests, while at the same time telling teachers to be innovative and creative within their classrooms.
    • efabscha
       
      How can we use personalization when so much pressure is put on teachers and students to meet the core standards and to do well on standardized assessments?
    • rmeyer1130
       
      Agreed. And while there are elements of PL that can be used within the current structure of our school system, I am not exactly sure I an visualize just how every student is learning and being assessed.
    • trgriffin1
       
      This is exactly what I was referring to in an earlier comment - as teachers we do what we can in the paradigm we are in. I think part of the goal of courses like this is to create within our current confines.
    • kspedersen
       
      I agree with all of the above comments. For the sake of conversation, however, I would like to question how constraining our current structure truly is? Although we do use the common core/curriculum to tell us what we need to teach students, the core does not dictate how we teach them. I wonder if we sometimes create more obstacles for ourselves because, at the end of the day, it is perhaps easier to follow along in a manual than to create 25 separate lessons that involve more personalization.
    • annabrousard
       
      I love the idea of personalization however I feel if my principal walked in and saw all of my students doing different activities she would NOT be happy. She would ask me what learning scales everyone is working on and I am not sure I would know how to respond.
  • Personalization promises better student achievement and, I believe, a more effective delivery method than any one teacher with 25 or 30 students in a classroom can compete with. It’s a no-brainer, right?
    • efabscha
       
      So what does this mean? We will have more teachers? Or we will look to the students to act as teachers at times?
    • kellijhall
       
      How do we accomplish this within current reality?
    • rmeyer1130
       
      I don't think it's as easy as a "no brainer," do you??
  • Certain forms of technology can be used to support progressive education, but meaningful (and truly personal) learning never requires technology
    • efabscha
       
      This surprises me as there is such a push for technology in the classroom today!
    • kellijhall
       
      Not to mention how you are pushed into using it over paper-pencil when your district is 1-1. I worry about what message it is sending to my students when I struggle so much with reading their handwriting!
    • julie_carroll
       
      It's a good reminder! Old-fashioned, face-to-face discussions and creative construction of meaning (i.e. brainstorming) still works!
    • kathleenweyers
       
      But technology can be a powerful tool for learning, creating, collaborating and such. Here is a simple example. Reading this article with other classmates and seeing their thinking pushes my thinking. How about connecting to an expert or author on Skype? That would create a learning opportunity far better than just reading about an author. Just saying, tech can be more powerful than the traditional methods of learning!
    • heidimeyer
       
      I agree there is power in learning with technology. However, the kids today have lost the simple art of communication in person. We need to focus on building more relationships out from behind the screens. The Skype idea is something my school implements and is an awesome learning experience we couldn't have otherwise. However, the students need to know how to have the eye contact, confidence and ability to be prepared talk to someone. This is taught and learned away from a screen.
    • katieconnolly20
       
      I babysit for many families and have seen the impact technology has on their home lives. Technology is so readily available. Children in today's society relay on technology in many ways and parents relay on it to entertain their children. With this said, I believe we will continue to see technology playing a key role in our schools. I feel that there is a time and place for technology to be used. Some people have commented that their schools are 1:1 with technology. As a kindergarten teacher and educator, I feel that technology has a time and place. However there are important skills that I strive to have my students learn without technology such as social skills and writing skills. It will be interesting to see how technology continues to be utilized in schools.
    • efabscha
       
      But most kids love technology!? I guess it doesn't have to be a requirement, but it should always be a option!
  • ed-tech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace.
    • efabscha
       
      I like this idea, but the classroom management piece makes me a bit nervous.
    • kellijhall
       
      This is what is often explained to teachers when personalized learning is brought up.
    • anonymous
       
      If a course is truly personalized, shouldn't the student be creating the pathway and goals while the teacher guides rather than prescribing the activities?
    • kathleenweyers
       
      So this reminds me of ST Math or Reflex Math. Even though the students is self-paced, it would not be considered "PL" in the truest form because the teacher is still assigning the content.
    • anonymous
       
      I agree Kathleen! We individualize the content the student is deficient in by assigning skills but there is no student choice. Just some 'fun' in learning through the online program.
  • “We often say we want creativity and innovation – personalization – but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance,”
  • “personal” learning is something they do for themselves.
    • julie_carroll
       
      Personalized vs. Personal Learning
    • heidimeyer
       
      This was profound for me!
  • personalization only comes when students have authentic choice over how to tackle a problem.
    • anonymous
       
      Yes!! When there are authentic choices, student buy-in and motivation increases. I like how the author included the phrase 'tackle a problem.' In the workplace, our students will be expected to sovle authentic problems adn this is a great way to build those critical thinking and resilency skills.
    • heidimeyer
       
      Yes!! I agree with you 100%. Nothing can prepare our students more than allowing them the opportunity to authentically tackle problems.
    • katieconnolly20
       
      As you both said, I agree with this statement 100%. I think it is awesome to allow students to authentically chose how to handle a problem. In kindergarten, I teach the importance of problem solving. I give my students prompts that allow them to become respectful leaders. I think problem solving is a great life skill that students can benefit from no matter their grade level!
  • the prevailing narrative seems to be that we can’t engage kids without technology,
    • anonymous
       
      I've noticed with my own students, that their excitement and engagement with technology has decreased as they increase the amount of time the are using technology in their gen. ed. classrooms. Since they are using technology to use programs that place them in a prescribed path after taking a placement test, they are loosing interest because they have lost the authentic connection to the content. The technology instruction is redundent and unpersonalized. They are missing the personal interactions with the teacher, discussing ideas with group members, and the choices provided in authentic learning. Students in my classroom are now more engaged through group work or hands on learning than technology.
    • anonymous
       
      Has anyone noticed this in their own classrooms as well? I believe technology should enhance instruction, not replace it in the elementary setting.
    • eswartzendruber
       
      Yes, I could see how this would be the case. We use a program similar to what you're discussing. As a district, we're supposed to be utilizing this online tool, but how effective is the tool if the students are no longer engaged with it?
    • annabrousard
       
      I definitely see this. I have trouble keeping my student's attention if I do not have the work projected onto the Smart Board.
  • monitor students’ progress
    • anonymous
       
      This frame of thinking challenges me. As a special education teacher, we monitor progress on reading fluency weekly. We need to follow a research-based curriculum and every week my students are tested and we I evalute their graphs. This information is legally required. How can I impliment a true personalized learning experience for my students when I am required to teach a research based intervention? Has personalized learning been applied successfully in a special education setting?
    • kspedersen
       
      This is a really good question and one that I am wondering about as well. Although I teach in a general education classroom, we too have to follow certain guidelines and use research-based curriculum. I wonder if personalized learning is only feasible for students who are at or above grade level?
  • our thinking about what we want our kids to learn and our changed roles in that process matters
    • rmeyer1130
       
      I love this article and what the author seems to be struggling with is what I struggle with. For the students enrolled in beginning band, I cannot make it a totally free learning environment. I can offer choice and give kids some freedom in choosing which exercises demonstrate learning targets, but what I want kids to learn is not really the student choice. Is it enough to say that band itself is an elective and if kids chose to explore band, then that is part of a personalized learning model?
    • rmeyer1130
       
      I am all for student involvement in making some of their own choices as they learn, but maybe I can't look past the needs of my content area to imagine a change in paradigm for all learners
  • but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance.’
    • julie_carroll
       
      We do function within a system...the question is how to negotiate that system to personalize for our students.
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think this is the hardest thing for both the teachers and students - it is easy to talk about PL, but once rubber hits the road it is very complex to make it work within the traditional confines of the school day and grading structures.
    • jhenning40
       
      There seems to be a big contradiction, at least in my mind, with matching personalized learning to the need/desire to tie everything to particular standard and grade. Our current system and expectation of a grade seems to limit the true sense of personalized learning.
  • choice
    • julie_carroll
       
      Ah- now I understand that if the choice is created and given by the teacher, it might not be personalization. Our district uses E 20/20 in some extreme cases and it generally does NOT meet any student's learning needs.
    • LaRae Arment
       
      I think this is where the disconnect is, many my district will do online learning but it isn't personailzed because it is driven by the program that the district uses and students just fly though he program to get done. In the end I don't think they learned anything from their courses. If it were personalized they would take more ownership in their learning.
  • resource rich
    • julie_carroll
       
      Partnering with community businesses and community organizations.
    • jhenning40
       
      That's a good point. There are often so many other experts within our own schools and communities who could be valuable resources for our learners.
  • agency
  • changing just about everything
    • julie_carroll
       
      Makes me think of the directive "we can no longer teach what kids can simply Google." So, learning becomes more inquiry-based and connected to real-life purposes.
    • LaRae Arment
       
      I recently heard that if a student can google the answer then we are not teaching them the higher order thinking that the industries are seeking now in their future employees. Google tends to give the surface answers and not the think out of the box answers unless they take the time to really dive into resources (which most won't take that time).
  • drive their own education
    • julie_carroll
       
      For me it keeps coming back to this: who drives the learning - the teacher or the student?
    • nthurm
       
      Do they know how to identify what specifically does drive their own education? We do a lot of modeling before asking the students to do different work. I think this is going to take some brainstorming as to HOW to help kids see what helps them learn.
  • You’re “free to expand as a standardized individual.”[
    • julie_carroll
       
      Ha! We have the "individual vs. society" discussion in my class each year and many students notice the irony of trying to be an individual by doing something that conforms to someone else's norms (i.e. dying your hair blue...like millions of other teens trying to be individuals is a classic 9th grader example).
    • trgriffin1
       
      This is a great point! It is hard to fit in and stand out:) It is hard to excel in school if you risk doing something different.
    • eswartzendruber
       
      I love reading your comments, Julie! That might be a challenge with personalized learning as well. Students struggle to be their own learner and achieve their personal goals - yet at this age, so many kids are drawn to the social dynamics of groups and trying to stay close in their developing friendships. As a fourth grade teacher I see students experimenting with the individual vs. group struggle on a regular basis. This will certainly be a challenge to stay on top of!
  • caring teacher who knows each child we
    • julie_carroll
       
      Yes! The most important "method" of teaching.
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think the core of PL is this - knowing the who/what/why/how for each student, this is true even within current school structures.
    • kspedersen
       
      I agree! We need to care about our students as people, not just as learners and I think that this will create great success for not only the teacher but for our students as well.
    • nthurm
       
      While I agree, it takes MORE than caring! If caring is all it took, I'd be golden, but figuring out how to implement it for 50-100 kids is where I struggle. I hope to learn this by the end of the course.
  • not created by them
  • construction of meaning
  • learning with and from one another.
  • collaboration and takes place in a community.
    • julie_carroll
       
      I am grateful to read this...my students report each year that some of their biggest "ah-ha" moments come from their peers. I know I learn so much each year from my students; there's no way I can be the "sage on the stage" when we're all in this learning thing together!
  • a textbook is still a textbook. You want to really engage kids? Give them opportunities to learn personally, to create their own texts and courses of study, and to pursue that learning with others in and out of the classroom who share a passion.
  • moving ownership of learning away from the teacher and more toward the student.
  • the best thing we can do for kids is empower them to make regular, important, thoughtful decisions about their own learning, what they learn and how they learn it,
  • we cherish our commitment to individualism yet experience a “relentless pressure to conform.” Each of us can do what he likes as long as he ends up fundamentally similar to everyone else:
  • Personal learning entails working with each child to create projects of intellectual discovery that reflect his or her unique needs and interests.
    • nthurm
       
      I'm sure this is an aim for most teachers. How to do it for EVERY student is what I hope to learn!
  • preoccupation with data data data data data.   Elsewhere, I’ve written about the folly of believing that everything can and should be reduced to numbers.[
  • For many educators that’s not the true meaning of “personalized learning.”
    • trgriffin1
       
      While I agree it isn't the true meaning, nor the widely accepted meeting, however I think it is the reality for what teachers can do in the current structure. When transcripts, grade scales, grade books and class sizes are currently where they are, this is the compromise or baby step towards the largest goal.
  • “personalized learning”
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think there is a difference between the technical definition and the operational definition. When you read about innovative schools who do all kinds of things, the easy criticism is that they can do what we can't. There is truth there, but the reality is that we need to try to do what is best for all of our students regardless of the status quo, especially when the status quo isn't working at the highest level.
  • It’s had an enormous effect on media, business, politics and journalism, and its effect on education
    • trgriffin1
       
      To his point, I think this statement is taken out of context to conflate tech and learning. Districts spend a lot of money on tech but not enough is done to change how teaching happens or tech pedagogy.
  • new dispositions to take advantage of it for learning.
    • trgriffin1
       
      I believe this is the major gap. Many taking this course are already jumping in (or did a while ago) but I think we too often ignore where others are in relation to that change. There are still teachers who refuse to integrate anything but a few substitutions for what they have always done, instead of real change.
    • eswartzendruber
       
      That's when teachers who believe in this change of learning need to use student work and proof of student motivation in order to get other teachers on board!
    • nthurm
       
      I would say, as educators, we fall into this trap when using technology. We need to look at what purpose the technology we are using is providing. Would it be more effective or simpler to understand without the newest technology? I'm not against technology, but sometimes we get so excited about what we found out on the internet that we don't keep an objective eye when choosing to implement it into our classrooms.
  • not be trained to wait for opportunities that someone else has selected for delivery
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think this connects well with the notion of dispositions - we need to create a system that supports learners who know how to learn - the whole candles to light instead of buckets to fill - but schools typically operate as bucket filling stations. A lot of students, families, and teachers need to support for this transition.
  • surely lost our way
    • trgriffin1
       
      I completely agree - I HATE hearing the word 'cool' when a learning about a new resource or tool. Things being cool doesn't lead to learning or engagement.
  • By assigning the lecture at home, we’re still in charge of delivering the curriculum, just at a different time
    • trgriffin1
       
      I think this is the current status of innovative teaching and learning for a lot of teachers. Flipped = Engagement = Innovative = Personalized etc. Really though, I think the good intentions are there, but the time, energy and resources aren't to move beyond intentions for a critical mass.
  • goals and practices
  • resemble standardized tests. When we hear a phrase such as “
    • trgriffin1
       
      This makes PL a tough sell - it isn't worth the time if it doesn't help the existing goals, but it isn't really PL if the goals are already defined.
  • reductive rubrics
    • trgriffin1
       
      I see a lot of SBG and SRG teachers explain how they can measure every discrete skill in an ELA standard with the right rubric, I feel that fits the cliche - seeing the forest through the trees. Every aspect of school can't be all or nothing - it is like the polar opposite of high stakes testing; a similar but different problem.
  • Personal learning tends to nourish kids’ curiosity and deepen their enthusiasm
    • heidimeyer
       
      That's what I strive to do but the linear curriculum can really hold the teacher and student back.
  • t is clear that all children don’t learn the same way
    • katieconnolly20
       
      How do we as teachers make sure that all students needs are met and that they are all able to gain the same amount of knowledge? I feel that there are so many different types of learners and sometimes as a teacher am overwhelmed by the different kinds of learns in my classroom. I struggle with how to meet each students needs to make sure I am doing my best as an educator.
    • jhenning40
       
      I think an important piece is to help students (and parents) understand the type of learner they are. Students who know what works best for them (auditory, visual, reading silently and hearing it read out loud, etc.) can begin to take steps towards helping their learning and success.
    • annabrousard
       
      I wonder if schools will ever start grouping students by learning type. For example, if there are 3 sections of second grade, one teacher might teach to the auditory learners, one the visual learners, and one the hands-on type.
    • LaRae Arment
       
      I like the idea of grouping students by their learning styles. It would really hit that personalized learning. However, what would happen if there was an unbalanced separation in learning styles. Do you think that schools would accommodate or would it be too expensive? I see this working really well in both special educ classrooms and regular educ rooms.
  • a textbook is still a textbook. You want to really engage kids? Give them opportunities to learn personally, to create their own texts and courses of study, and to pursue that learning with others in and out of the classroom who share a passion.
    • katieconnolly20
       
      I love this part of this text. As a kindergarten teacher, I believe it is important for students to have that exploration and discovery time in the classroom. They need to learn at a young age to be their own teachers. It has amazed me during our center time this past year what five and six year olds are able to discover and share with me!
    • LaRae Arment
       
      Yes! I think this can work at any level for learners. Why would we want to limit a learner to stop at a certain point and not stretch themselves in a direction that will better them as a students. I believe this is where students discover their interests and strong points with a little bit of freedom.
  • engagement”
  • industrialized form of education that pumps out cookie-cutter students
    • nthurm
       
      These words used here could easily offend someone who has been in education, those who have created good lessons with ways to reach various children: "industrialized," "pumps out," and "cookie-cutter students." Not a great idea at the beginning of an article if you wish for veteran teachers to read and learn from ideas presented about personalized learning - might seem like another buzz term because there have been a lot of them throughout the years!
  • tware
    • nthurm
       
      This is a problem in itself when there is no funding to do this!
  • “’Personalized’ learning is something that we do to kids; ‘personal’ learning is something they do for themselves.”[4]
  • “It’s so much cheaper to buy a new computer than to pay a teacher’s salary year after year.”[11]
    • nthurm
       
      This is what I fear for the future of education! Going one-to-one and seeing the push for technology in lesson planning worries me that education is not going to need the person in the future!
Mary Overholtzer

ollie1: Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 0 views

    • Monte DeArmoun
       
      This is where online testing will be a benefit. Students could have immediate feedback on their learning process. Teachers will NEED to create a variety of assessments to keep students interested so they are not bored from taking the same type of test.
    • Deon Wingert
       
      I agree 100% Monte! Students DO want feedback immediately, and I truly believe this would provide for IMMEDIATE feedback, if used effectively.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      Plus.... no papers to carry home!
  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student
    • Monte DeArmoun
       
      If teachers haven't tried the software how can they instruct the students or answer the students' questions? I am enjoying this class!
    • Bob Pauk
       
      This is the fourth online class I have taken and have definately experience online learning. Most has been very good and very easy to follow, but some has been very confusing. I do use aspects with my current classes such as blogging.
    • crjessen44
       
      I feel this is critical. As a teacher, I believe all teachers need to live this experience first hand, in the role of a student. Being a student in an on-line evironment will help me to be a better on-line faciliator. I will be more sympathetic to the stuggles of being on-line learner and hopefully I will be more effective, learning from my experience as a student.
    • david moeller
       
      Yes, going through the process helps us better understand how to use it. And provides us with both resources and examples.
    • anonymous
       
      I am enjoying this class very much. I also believe that we as educators must experience things ourselves so that we can better help our students and understand the struggles that they might encounter.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I definitely concur. It is vital to know the problems frequently encountered and how to trouble shoot them from experience.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      We gain student trust not only when we can help them solve technological challenges but when we can empathize with them as well.
    • mhauser
       
      This class is a great experience, but sometimes I've wondered if Evan has purposely built some obstacles into the course so that we could experience the kinds of problems that our kids might experience and have that empathy going in. For example, last Sunday night I tried to finish up the first week's work, but couldn't get in to the program. While I found out later that the server was quirky, I didn't know that at the time. I just knew that my work was going to be late, and the kid in me said, "I'm in trouble!" That was a very good experience.
    • Jessica White
       
      Think of all the years that we have spent as students in the "traditional" classroom setting. We have watched teachers and seen so much modeling. Those experiences are still with us as we teach today. Online learning is a new avenue, but we still need to see the modeling from our teachers. It will help us be more successful as teachers.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have been in trouble with lates since day one....This online experience is NOT anything like I have experienced in the past. The tools out there are phenomenal...and overwhelming.
  • 5. Creates and implements a variety of assessments that meet course learning goals and provide data to improve student progress and course instruction (ITS 5)
    • Monte DeArmoun
       
      This is where online testing will be a benefit. Students could have immediate feedback on their learning process. Teachers will NEED to create a variety of assessments to keep students interested so they are not bored from taking the same type of test.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I have clickers in my room which does allow for immediate feedback. It can be very useful, but have had pretty significant software problems with the clickers so far.
    • Monte DeArmoun
       
      Is there a particular brand/kind that you use?
    • Tresa Zaragoza
       
      I have clickers, but I am a little weak on using them.
  • ...50 more annotations...
  • 1. Demonstrates ability to enhance academic performance and support for the agency's student achievement goals (ITS 1)
    • Mary Trent
       
      It is difficult to develop assessment tools that show this kind of learning growth with technology without it being more of a lab setting with a control group. I haven't found anything real practical yet that is reliable.
  • Tailors instruction to meet the different needs of students, including different learning styles, different interests and backgrounds, and students with special needs or whom are language learners (SREB C.7, Varvel V.H, ITS 4.c)
    • Mary Trent
       
      I think that classroom teachers are still struggling with this. We are improving our teaching styles to meet the needs and different learning styles of students, but we aren't quite there yet. My son, for example, is an auditory learner. I'd like for him to be able to have tests read to him without filling out a 504 or IEP. It should just be something that every classroom is quipped to do and the teacher is willing to do it.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      This is always a challenge. We have done training on this for years.
    • crjessen44
       
      This one grabbed my attention. I'm currently helping two students with special learning needs take an on-line math class for credit recovery. It has been a very frustrating experience for them in multiple capacities. They not only struggle with content, but with technology issues - the two combined are sometimes more than the students can handle. On a positive note, I've seen some really cool things you can do within an on-line class to tailor the instruction to better meet their needs. I think in some respects you could perhaps more easily tailor on-line learning to meet the needs of a more diverse set of learners?
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      I think these online learning tools, if used properly, can help all students, but especially thoses with special needs (including TAG, ELL, etc.). I think the ability to move at their own pace would help some greatly!
    • rcordes1961
       
      Ashely took my comments! She is dead on though. Online learning tools can be an amazing assest to students with special needs, if used appropriately. In Mary's example, podcasting or some other type of online audio program could be used to assist auditory learners.
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      I am a huge fan of Howard Gardner's multiple intelligence model. As I have been searching through the "Cool Tools for School" website, I am constantly thinking of ways I could apply these newly discovered tools to my curriculum to reach all of the eight intelligences to some degree. I really think it will be vital to offer more options in an on-line course, since the face-to-face interaction will be less, perhaps making it more difficult to get to know students and their unique personalities.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I think one way to address this is to do a hybrid course with some online aspects and other face to face. I think anytime we can have variety in our assignments, presentations and assessments, we are more likely to reach a greater number of students with at least some part of our class.
    • Shirley Horstman
       
      I like the hybrid concept. Our students are diverse in the way they learn and this allows each student to maximize and individual their learning.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Again, moderation in all things is key for learning and building relationships.
  • • Provides and communicates evidence of learning and course data to students and colleagues (SREB J.6, ITS 1.a
    • rcordes1961
       
      Providing feedback to students in any type of course is extremely important in order for students to continue to progress. When not meeting face to face with the instructor communication and course feedback is imperative.
    • Deon Wingert
       
      Rob, I think that feedback, when given constructively to students prior to any type of evaluation, can be one of the most effective teaching tools a teacher can use!
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      I think the use of technology will enhance feedback opportunities. I also think that the peer feedback opportunities could be a very enriching experience for students, in addition to teach feedback.
    • anonymous
       
      I struggle with feedback within my language arts classroom when it comes to writing assignments. By the time I get them all graded and handed back, the kids look at their grade and many recycle them on their way out. Did they really benefit from all the time I spent making comments and giving them feedback?
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I think that supplementing our face-to-face classrooms with online environments (ex. Moodle) will enrich the student experience and provide the teacher with a quicker response method.
    • rcordes1961
       
      Sherri, I wonder if students would take more time reading feedback if the feedback was on some form of online feedback. I agree many times students are just interested only in the grade as oposed to how to improve or what they can learn from the feedback. I said many times, nothing gets in the way of learning more, than the almighty grade!
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I model feedback after the Boy's town Model. Constructive feedback starts with a powerful statement of praise AND supporting details. We also have a consideration statement...NO buts...for example: I truly appreciate the aesthetic details that your writing creates within my mind due to your word choice and the emotions created. You might consider looking at us more by becomeing more familiar with your writing so that eye contact is given to your audience. I have found that many students appreciate oral feedback and most look forward to it. Naturally, I always end the feedback session after the students go. What's really neat is when students have done such a good job with feedback that it's difficult for me to add more...
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Once again, it's the relationship piece that is needed within the feedback piece. I believe we need to show students improvement through building the relationship.
  • • Demonstrates growth in technology knowledge and skills in order to stay current with emerging technologies (SREB B.5)
    • Deon Wingert
       
      I am TRYING to stay current with technologies provided by our staff development, and believe it is critical to stay one step ahead of students.
    • anonymous
       
      I also am trying to stay current with new forms of technology. My biggest roadblock though is not knowing what is out there. That's why I was so excited to see the Cool Tools for Schools site. It was a valuable resource that I can browse through to find out what is currently being used technology-wise.
    • Amy Burns
       
      I am constantly hunting for new tools to use. I am sometimes frustrated by sites that lure me in and then, just as I am feeling comfortable using their tools, suddenly want to charge me. Back to searching......
    • rcordes1961
       
      Staying current with new technolgy is vitally important, however, I respectfully disagree with Deon that teaches need to stay ahead of the students, as students can sometimes be the best teachers for adults.
    • mhauser
       
      I agree with rcordes, sorry Deon! We can't keep ahead we have to guide. I took the human relations course 30 years ago, and remember hearing for the first time that teachers would become 'facilitators'. I thought that was a crazy idea back then, but boy, that has to be who we are. It's great when the kids solve a problem before me, for them and for me.
    • Chip Bishop
       
      Staying current on technology is an never ending struggle. You can't keep up with all of it, but by focusing on a few things that work for you can make it less stressful.
    • Victoria Guilliatt
       
      I agree with not knowing what is out there, especially since I am not in the classroom anymore, it is hard to find sites that are easy to navigate.
  • • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face (SREB C.1, Varvel V)
    • Tim Hughes
       
      This could be difficult for an animated personality, where actions speak as loud as words.
    • anonymous
       
      I can definitely see the benefits to teaching online, but it would be a sad foreign language class if all of the material was taught this way. There has to be social, face-to-face interactions. That's where fluency can be built.
    • anonymous
       
      I totally agree. I keep trying to add more technology to my classes all the time, but I really try to caution myself to add it because it is an improvement and not just simply adding technology.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      This standard seems very vague to me. How do you determine if the instructor knows the difference between face to face and online learning? I guess I am still sorting out and determining that myself what the difference is, so may be why it is difficult for me to discern.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      It's the relationship variable.....do we care enough to reach out?
  • • Provides and communicates evidence of learning and course data to students and colleagues (SREB J.6, ITS 1.a)
  • Is knowledgeable and has the ability to use computer programs required in online education to improve learning and teaching, including course management software (CMS) and synchronous/asynchronous communication tools (chat, email, web 2.0, videoconferencing, webinar, whiteboard, etc.) (SREB B.3, Varvel III.B)
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I currently use numreous programs: from powerpoint and gradebook to email, smartboard, blogging, etc. In four weeks I will either be much more technologically advanced or I will be ready to give up.
    • Tim Hughes
       
      I must agree. It is starting to get out of hand
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      Yes, I know, but I'm willing to give it a good shot. If I fail, I fail, but I think I'll learn something useful. I guess "Nothing ventured, nothing gained" applies here very well.
    • Steven Petersen
       
      This standard will have to be updated a lot. Technology seems to change very frequently. What is advanced today may very well be obsolete tomorrow. More importantly, the variety of technology out there makes this a nightmare. You might be in one district that utilizes one type of application then go to another district that uses a totally different platform for the same task.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I'm with you all on this. It's called information overload. Moderation in all things is GOOD. Too much drink, we know what it does. Too much food, we know what that does. Too much technology, oh nooooo what could that do. Moderation in all things will bring a balance
  • Selects and uses technologies appropriate to the content that enhance learning
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      I definitely need to work on this standard. Everything seems so new and unfamiliar. I hope I can learn through this course which tools are appropriate for my students and curriculum.
    • rcordes1961
       
      Ashley, it is very difficult to determine what strategy or technology is best to use when, especially, when there are so many different options out there for an instructor to use online. I guess we just need to keep an open mind and adjust accordingly because new technology is always being developed.
    • Laura Eklund
       
      This is also something I need to work on. There are so many online tools that are available to use, but I feel overwhelmed by the number available to us.
    • Joleen Louwsma
       
      I am currently using Moodle for several of my classes. I don't use the "tools" to make my classes more engaging. My goal is to use the Moodle as more than a homework repository. I think we all have good intentions on adding technology , but we get bogged down in the routines. This class is a great way to explore new "tools". :)
    • Jeffrey Haverland
       
      Technology is such a difficult thing because it is ever changing, and it seems that by the time we get it loaded on our machines, life has moved on without us. The other issue is the amount of tools that are available for use because time to explore is rather limited.
    • David Olson
       
      I have not yet figured out what technology is fun, and what technology is actually useful in teaching.
    • Melissa Hesner
       
      I believe a lot of teachers (myself included) are stuck in using technology as an add-on to learning. For example, my 6th grade students are currently creating Google presentations about extraterrestrial locations. The presentations are very nice and the practice of making and presenting them will help communication skills, but the creation of the presentation itself will not enhance their learning of the science content. I have simply integrated a different media for presentation. We need to use technology in pedagogy not a superficial add-on.
  • Sets and models clear expectations for appropriate behavior and proper interaction
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      Critical piece when working with young adults in this media age!
    • Chip Bishop
       
      I would agree, and add that teachers also, to be reminded of what is appropriate. You see all too often where a teacher is being accused of inappropriate behavior while use social media sites.
  • ensure academic integrity
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      It is so important to teach them media literacy. I know this is a fear that my fellow teachers have about moving to online learning, but academic integrity should be part of the curriculum!
    • Shirley Horstman
       
      Academic integrity is necessary when learning online! One also needs to teach students how to filter through all the information to find the accurate sources.
    • mhauser
       
      Academic integrity has been an issue long before the development of the internet. I started out as an English teacher and have several tales of the plagiarized or bogus research paper. I moved to the role of teacher librarian in '95 as the internet surged into our lives. what an interesting dynamic it is, but the issues go back to basic human ideas of right and wrong. I very much appreciate that the teaching standards, the core and the 21st Century Skills all address this fundamental issue of working with people.
  • Demonstrates techniques for dealing with issues arising from inappropriate student technological use
    • david moeller
       
      this can be difficult. but it seems that there are tools in place in our LMS's to choose to moderate what students are posting, and disallow any inappropriate comments. or at least delete them shortly after their initial posting. email alerts make this easier.
    • Matt Tracy
       
      Isn't it amazing just how little the students understand about what is appropriate and inappropriate online?
    • April Tidwell
       
      I am constantly amazed at what a student thinks is appropriate as well. Most of our teachers are concerned about going 1:1 becasue of this reason.
  • Demonstrates competence in content knowledge (including technological knowledge) appropriate to the instructional position
  • Assists students with technology used in the course
    • Laura Eklund
       
      With my experience so far in teaching it seems that the students will be assisting me with the technology. My students seem much more knowledgeable than me.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I think they have more time to just explore than we do. What I dislike most about exploring technology is the amount of time it takes.
    • hollysoby
       
      I've noticed how many basic things kids don't know about technology, though. Like the one I notice the most is they do not know how to use Google - if they are looking for answers to questions, they post the full question. While I think there are a lot of things they are better at than we are, we still need to stay on top of the technology that matters most to us so they can learn the best ways to use things.
  • Understands student motivation and uses techniques to engage students (Varvel V.D, ITS 4.d)
    • Julia Schreckengast
       
      Engaging students is a constant struggle for me in my mathematics classes. Any appropriate technology to assist in that would be helpful.
    • Joleen Louwsma
       
      I also struggle with engaging students in the Language Arts classroom. Getting students to try new things isn't always easy, but I think they get bored with some technology. Finding and perfecting different technoloical ideas may help students to stay engaged.
    • Kathryn Christensen
       
      I also think students get bored with technology tools. The key question is...are you use the correct technology tool? Our students (or at least most of the class) will get bored if there is fluke during the lesson and will notice if the tool doesn't fit the lesson well.
    • Jeffrey Haverland
       
      Student motivation is a concern for me when considering online learning. There is something about a living, breathing, and physically accessible educator that brings me peace of mind.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      My challenge is to translate what some of these tools do in relation to what I traditionally do with a group of students. If I think through the tool plus the strategies I use in class...what new products could be developed? Kind of boggles the mind.
    • Boyd Card
       
      Engaging students is a little work at times. Students have developed so many skills with portable technolgoy they carry with them,the first challenge is to get them present then get them to engage??
  • Demonstrates effective instructional strategies and techniques, appropriate for online education, that align with course objectives and assessment (SREB
    • Julia Schreckengast
       
      Using online instruction for a high school class requires an appropriate balance between the online and the in class instruction.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      Finding that balance may be challenge. I have not thought deeply about some of the strategies we use in the district butI believe online might be interesting to use with AIW...both teachers and as we move to students reflecting on their work.
  • informs student of their rights to privacy and the conditions under which their work may be shared with others
    • Matt Tracy
       
      I wish the students were aware that privacy was okay and they don't have to share everything. This is a huge issue with the technology now available.
  • Maintains an online social presence that is a
    • Joleen Louwsma
       
      I'm wondering about building the relationship and discussions with online students. I build on student questions and anwers. How does the time delay affect the social aspect? How will I know if the students feel I'm approachable or unapproachable?
    • Kathryn Christensen
       
      I have been wondering the same thing but...our instructor has managed to gain my trust and is approchable. He has done this through timely and honest emails. Thanks Evan!!
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      I agree that Evan does seem very approachable and has provided helpful and timely feedback, but I too wonder how this is possible. I guess it still seems a bit overwhelming when I am not overly familiar with Moodle. Perhaps the best thing to do is have an initial activity like we had for this course where students introduce themselves in a creative manner and respond to others' introductions as well; it serves as an icebreaker.
    • Steven Petersen
       
      Contractually this one bothers me. It would almost appear that teachers will be required to work outside the contract time on a regular basis. This may lead to some legal issues.
  •  Demonstrates effective instructional strategies and techniques, appropriate for online education, that align with course objectives and assessment (SREB C.1, SREB G.6, Varvel V.C, ITS 3.d, ITS 4.b)
  • Communicates with students effectively and consistently
    • Kathryn Christensen
       
      Time consuming???? Any ideas on how to handle this with out being on consant email surveillance?
    • mhauser
       
      I've used e-mail and a blog to communicate with sophomore world history students for several years. E-mail is actually pretty fast. It's a great way for kids to ask for help. I think it's easier for the student to get my attention that way, because they're not competing for my attention, and they're not embarrassed about the help they're asking for. I respond to their blog posts privately. They receive my comments in both an e-mail and in a reply on the blog. I think your question about constant surveillance is a good one. It's easy to respond quickly to e-mail questions, but I've found that I need to establish a time to respond to their blog entries. Depending on the class, you would have to determine how often and when you'd respond. Otherwise you'd be constantly distracted.
    • Deb Ritchie
       
      An organized approach to responding has been an issue for me this year. I'm likeing the model Evan is using in this course with specific days we can expect assignments to be graded and specific times he will be checking e-mail, etc. I think I will borrow from that idea. Of course, the burden is eased when we are also seeing students fact to face and not just online.
  • encourages collaboration
    • Kathryn Christensen
       
      Great to see so many tools for problem solving with a partner (no matter what you teach)!
    • Amy Kemp
       
      I agree.  I feel it is very important to have that learning community to allow the students to collaborate.  Let's face it, the less we say, the more they learn!
  • including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      With teaching middle school social studies, I am constantly changing up the dynamic of my classroom. Students work individually, in pairs, in small groups, as a whole class, individually conference with me, deliver individual and group presentation, etc. I think changing the arrangement helps middle school students to refocus and stay interested in the material. At first I though this would be difficult to accomplish online; however, I am now realizing that there are many different ways to interact through a wide array of tools.
  • including rubrics for student performances and participation
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      My students are always wanting to know what they are going to be graded on and how they can earn an A. Originally I thought creating a rubric would be a stressful task, but now I have found that rubrics make grading much easier. Also, the feedback provided on the rubric is more beneficial and detailed for students. I also have found that students are more productive and focused on work days, as they know my expectations ahead of time, and they know exactly what they need to do to earn the grade they desire. Certainly with online learning, a rubric would be a key communication tool in guiding students when the instructor might not be readily available to answer questions.
  • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the course
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      My first year of teaching I had both a self-evaluation for students and a course evaluation to gain an understanding of how students felt the year had gone. I have not done this since, probably because I use several formative assessment strategies throughout each unit to gauge student understanding. I definitely think a course and/or instructor evaluation would be essential in an online learning environment, especially for those of us just starting out, so we can use students' suggestions to better improve our instruction.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I am in agreement with you about the need for course and instructor evaluations, but I think a lot of times it gets overlooked or dropped.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      The most effective course evaluation is frequent and ongoing. Feedback from students is more specific right after an activity or unit than at the end of the school year. Perhaps a course evaluation could be divided into sections to be completed at appropriate times throughout the year.
    • Boyd Card
       
      Having just finished teaching a college class I am awaiting the the student feedback the college requires the students to fill out under the supervison of another person. It will be informative to read what they belive my teaching had done for them.
    • April Tidwell
       
      I use survey monkey for my evaluations. I do it by quarters. It's great because it is free, and it complies the data for you. I get a lot of good information from these surveys and would definitely continue to do this with an online course.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I appreciate data. I appreciate the time needed to look at the data. Until we are able to become more reflective practitioners during the school year, looking at data won't necessarily happen. I know how much time I take to look at data. I am not harried during the summer. When professional development allows for time to be reflective in our teaching, I do think greater results will happen.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      As much data as we have at our finger tips, I feel the variable that consistently comes through is the relationship piece. Teaching over the ICN is different than teaching in a face to face. As an instructor of a college level class, my evaluations have always suffered when comparing the face to face students with the students who are at another site. They really don't have any idea what I am like during the natural coffee breaks because of that relationship piece that is lacking. Having a face to face relationship is different than having an online relationship, yet I do believe it's easier to build in person. Many contacts via email doesn't necessarily build it, yet quick responses in email can help....but being that 24/7 teacher is really hard as we juggle our own lives.
  • Meets the professional teaching standards established by a state-licensing agency, or has the academic credentials in the field in which he or she is teaching (SREB A.1, Varvel II.A)
    • Jeffrey Haverland
       
      This is really a critical piece because even thought the course is online, it better be high quality educators who are delivering it through the lens of sound educational practices. One of my biggest fears is online learning opening up a venue for for anyone who thinks they would be better at teaching than trained educators.
    • Boyd Card
       
      As a vocational instructor it is imperative to know your content and be prepared to present it in a manor that not only tranfers the knowledge to the student but in a way that it is retained- (safety)
    • Melissa Hesner
       
      Well said, Jeffrey! I believe it takes cream of the crop teachers who have deep understanding of teaching and learning to teach online. It is hard for some to make learning activities meaningful and rigorous in a face-to-face setting, and to do so in an online setting would be even harder, especially when considering effective instruction for the content area.
  • • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students (SREB A.3, Varvel II.A, ITS 2.a)
    • Jeffrey Haverland
       
      This really goes along with what I wrote above. Not only do online instructors need to understand teaching and learning, they also need to have the background to teach that course. We can all be "experts" at things we know nothing about--Wikipedia is a great example of this, but the ability to "impart" this knowledge on others needs to be controlled.
    • Steven Petersen
       
      This one has troubled me lately. When I began teaching at the post-secondary level there was a certification required. Now you only have to have enough credits in the topic area to teach it. There is no certification required. This does not insure that the person teaching the course actually knows how to teach.
    • Jessica White
       
      I had a professor in college tell me that intelligence is one thing that separates great teachers from good teachers. I have never forgotten this, and I see it over and over. Teachers need to know the content, but also need to know how to teach. You can't have one without the other.
  • Knows and aligns instruction to the achievement goals
    • Shirley Horstman
       
      To maximize knowledge the subject area content must be aligned to the goals. Assessment must also be aligned!
  • Understands and uses data from assessments to guide instruction
  • Provides substantive, timely, and constructive feedback to students
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I have found that timely feedback is vital for student learning. It avoids future similar mistakes and when not provided, can lead to feelings of failure on the student's part. Timely feedback can nip most problems in the bud.
    • Boyd Card
       
      Timely feed back is very important. It allows students to grow with direction.
  • Creates a safe environment, managing conflict (Varvel VII.D, ITS 6.e)
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      While I do not have any experience of any kind in the online teaching world, Evan may know, what does conflict look like between students in the online world?
  • Designs the structure of the course and the presentation of the content to best enhance student learning, including using unit/lesson overviews and reviews, using patterns in lesson sequencing, and using appropriate visual web design techniques
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      I have taken "online courses" for graduate credit in which the structure of the course was nothing more than a list of assignments to complete outside the Moodle and snail mail to the instructor. Those poor examples certainly helped me understand the importance of the structure and presentation of online courses!
    • Boyd Card
       
      I would have to say I had the same experience a long time ago with a computer class I took on line. From what I am experiencing so far this will not be that type of course. We will be experiencing may stuyles and types of learning! : )
    • hollysoby
       
      I'm really excited about the blended learning idea - I'm already thinking of how I can really change how I teach publications - I have some students who have had a pre-req writing class, some who haven't, some who are brand new, other with experience, and I think I can use online learning to offer more ways to make sure all those groups are learning and being challenged.
  • Promotes learning through online collaboration group work that is goal-oriented and focused
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Well-designed online collaborative learning activities, which provide a greater opportunity for a student to work at his or her own pace, may be less threatening and result in greater participation than in-class group work.
    • Heather Gould
       
      I agree, however, it's an adjustment for students. I do feel the collaborative element is essential regardless of the modality of the learning. I work with middle school students through our AEA 267 National Day on Writing project. It's been interesting to watch some students flourish with collaboration at a distance, while others struggle working with people they can't 'see'.
  • appropriate for online learning
    • Bev Berns
       
      What would be examples of 'multiple assessment instruments here? Does this refer to typical rubrics?
    • Deb Ritchie
       
      Hmmm. Using moodle there could be an on-line multiple choice test, a blog entry, and insightful forum posts. Would those be multiple assessment instruments?
  • instruments
    • Tresa Zaragoza
       
      Not everyone learns the same so this is a very important part of any teaching.
  • Aligns assessment with course objectives
  • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies
    • April Tidwell
       
      This is a BIG push in our district. They have spent a lot of time and money in data collection, and now the push is to get teachers to actually use the data to drive in struction
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I find using the data is the hardest component. We have so much data within our district, yet the time variable is needed in order to make change concerning this data.
  • interaction
    • April Tidwell
       
      I'm amazed how kids seems to interact more on line then they will in class. I hosted a chat during a class period and kids that never raise their hand in class were contributing and even leading the discussion. I thing online learning helps this generation connect in a learning community.
  • age and ability level
    • Heather Gould
       
      In the research I've read about age and ability level, I was surprised to learn that an instructor cannot assume that the young are tech savvy and older participants will struggle with technology. There is no research to support this, as sometimes just the opposite is the case.
  • Provides opportunities that enable student self-assessment and pre-assessment within courses
  • Identifies and communicates learning outcomes and expectations through a course overview/orientation
    • hollysoby
       
      I'm hoping I can use online learning to make standards and expectations clear to students upfront - currently I give them packets every unit with the plan nad assignments for that unit, and I'm hoping Moodle makes that process easier, more clear and less dead tree intensive.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      You should have chosen green as your highlighter color. :) Saving trees is great for all. Beyond saving trees, I think having something that students can always access anywhere is great. Whether they are at a friend's house, on the bus or at grandma's in another state, items posted online can be found. I think it elimnates some of the excuse that "I didn't know what was due."
  • multiple assessment
  • Selects and understands how to evaluate learning materials and resources that align with the context and enhance learning (SREB C.15, SREB M.4, Varvel IV.C, ITS 3.e, ITS 4.f)
    • Amy Kemp
       
      In Math, choosing the appropriate resource is critical as it is in any course.
    • Jason Gomez
       
      This is going to be hard; knowing how to grade it? I hope there is a rubric that is easy to follow.
  • Understands and uses course content that complies with intellectual property rights and fair use, and assists students in complying as well
    • Tim Hadley
       
      If I struggle with any area, it is probably making sure that what I am using is not a violation of this standard. I suppose I grew up in a family that shared everything, so when it comes to the property rights of others, I share and share alike.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have taught that explaining it at the kindergarten level can enhance a student's ability to work the material in a manner that becomes his/her idea. It's really hard to plagarize when it's written in kindergarten terms.
  • Networks with others involved in online education for the purpose of professional growth (SREB L.1, ITS 7.b)
  • Applies research, knowledge, and skills from professional growth to improve practice
    • Victoria Guilliatt
       
      I want to be able to use the new information I learn in the this class and apply it to my library classes that I teach in the elementary.
    • Victoria Guilliatt
       
      I plan to use the knowledge I gain from this class with my students.
  •  Is knowledgeable and has the ability to use  computer programs required in online education to improve learning and teaching, including course management software (CMS) and synchronous / asynchronous communication tools (chat, email, web 2.0, videoconferencing, webinar, whiteboard, etc.) (SREB B.3, Varvel III.B)
  • Demonstrates competence in planning, designing, and incorporating instructional strategies (ITS 3)
    • Jason Gomez
       
      This could take a while for me; I'm still learning how to do this stuff let a lone plan, design, & incorporate. I can already see there will be a lot of trial & error this coming year
  • Iowa Core
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      There is so much to learn about the Iowa Core. I'm so glad there is a great deal of exposure within this class.
  • multiple intelligences
  • constructivism, behaviorism, cognitivism, connectivism, and group theory
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      All these theories will bring a better understanding to educators when it is worked into our vocabulary.
  • community
  •  
    See title
jessicawoods8

Articles: Preparation - 6 views

  • Start with the end in mind
    • kbelland21
       
      I think this is really important. Looking at what we want our students to learn at the end of a lesson is the beginning of lesson planning. Looking at the end goal is the start of presentation planning.
    • Patty Harrell
       
      Yes. What is the outcome. Currently, we ask: What do I want students to know? and we also have to ask: How will I know they got it? In other words, what measuring tool will be used. This can indeed impact your story and the number of "big ideas" you choose to include.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This makes sense for teachers, since we think this way for educational objectives. But for other speakers, this might be a more novel idea.
    • pattyharris123
       
      Even outside of education, Evan, we should be thinking of the end - what are we trying to accomplish or get across? Otherwise, the presentation would just be a mess....LOL
    • nettiemarie
       
      I think this only makes sense you need to know what you what your students to know in the end and work backwards
  • Who is the audience?
    • Patty Harrell
       
      Great question! And how do I get their attention?
    • tjbudd
       
      Exactly. I never have the same class from semester to semester. Students with different interests, abilities, and backgrounds.
    • pattyharris123
       
      Most of the time, my audience members have been teachers. (I have been an elementary principal.) My teachers want to focus more on getting papers graded, "side barring", and working on plans than listening. (Yes, they have been a challenge.) I need to really hit them with something catchy in order to get their attention! Teachers are hard to deal with. :) (Been there, done that. LOL)
  • If your audience could remember only three things about your presentation,what would you want it to be?
    • kbelland21
       
      This goes back to having the end in mind. What do you want the audience to remember at the end? Great question to ask when planning for your presentation.
    • mnollsch
       
      Yes, a great reminder about how to keep it simple.
    • joyisuful
       
      I always need to think about this before I start planning a presentation and then stick with it.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      A helpful tip in order to slim down a presentation.
    • jessicawoods8
       
      Important to remember when planning a presentation! 
  • ...56 more annotations...
  • whiteboard in my office to sketch out my ideas
    • kbelland21
       
      This is another great idea. I am a very visual person. This would help me better prepare myself for the presentation.
    • mnollsch
       
      I think sticky notes will work well for me as I like to be able to move things around.  I do this with students as a class activity and it works well.  I think it will work for the planning stage too.
  • audience to remember your content, then find a way to make it more relevant and memorable by strengthening your core message with good, short, stories or examples.
    • kbelland21
       
      I agree. I can recall information if it can be related back to me in some way. Make it relevant to the audience.
  • contrast is one of the most fundamental and important elements to include.
    • kbelland21
       
      Never thought of having contrast in a presentation. Contrast does keep the audiences attention.
  • Do not fall into the trap of thinking that in order for your audience to understand anything, you must tell them everything. Which brings us to the idea of simplicity.
    • mnollsch
       
      I know I do this often.  It's a balancing act to figure out what the primary point of each lesson and yet also provide enough background for students to know the why. I want them to be able to talk about the evidence-base. It's important to recognize that the why can be done in a simple way.
    • joyisuful
       
      I do this as well.  Sometimes I need to let the background information come out as I'm talking and adjust if I feel I need to tell more as I find out their understanding.  Sometimes I give them way too much information when they would understand better if I kept it simple.
  • I draw sample images that I can use to support a particular point, say, a pie chart here, a photo there, perhaps a line graph in this section and so on
    • mnollsch
       
      In the past I have planned my words first and the visuals were added later to break up my words. So I wasn't really looking at the presentation as a whole.  This is definitely a new and better way of planning!
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This seems like it would be second nature to me, but I need to include more of this.  I use lots of visual examples, but this is different...using visuals to make points (rather than lots of bullets of information).
  • so what
    • mnollsch
       
      "So What?" Great question.  I want students to know some content in order to apply it to their own teaching and interactions with children.  If I am just giving them facts without asking the "So What? or So that?" question I might be overloading them.  This could help me learn to simplify
  • In a story, you not only weave a lot of information into the telling but you also arouse your listener’s emotion and energy,” he says.
    • mnollsch
       
      Weaving the facts into the story or connecting the facts back to the story will help them stick.
  • udiences tend to forget lists and bullet points, but stories come naturally to us;
    • mnollsch
       
      I know stories work when I see students use the stories or examples when they answer essay exam questions!  The story makes the concept stick.
    • joyisuful
       
      Bullet points only make us think we need to take notes and memorize.  We rush to get them all down and don't pay attention to what is being said.  Stories help us remember!
    • we4nails
       
      I often find that with bullets, now that most people will send you the outline or hand it to you, that I just start making a to-do list with (look over this later) as one of them!