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Matti Narkia

Vegetables, Nuts And Mediterranean Diet Better For Heart, Research Review - 0 views

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    Scientists in Canada reviewing the research so far on links between different diets and heart disease found strong evidence that diets high in vegetables and nuts, and those that follow a Mediterranean pattern rich in fruit, vegetables and fish were strongly associated with lower heart disease risk than those that rely on food with a high glycemic index or high in trans-fatty acids. High glycemic index food includes rice, pasta and refined carbohydrates like white bread, and foods high in trans-fatty acids include fried foods, baked goods and snacks.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D replacement in Asians with diabetes may increase insulin resistance. - 0 views

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    Vitamin D replacement in Asians with diabetes may increase insulin resistance.
    Taylor AV, Wise PH.
    Postgrad Med J. 1998 Jun;74(872):365-6.
    PMID: 9799895

    We report three cases of vitamin D replacement in British Asians with vitamin D deficiency and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In all cases, replacement resulted in an increase in insulin resistance and a deterioration of glycaemic control
Matti Narkia

Low-Carb and Mediterranean Diets Beat Low-Fat for Weight Loss, Lipid Changes at 2 Years... - 0 views

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    July 16, 2008 - Both a low-carbohydrate diet or a Mediterranean-style diet may be "effective alternatives" to a low-fat diet, with more favorable effects on lipids and/or glycemic control, new research suggests [1]. The two-year study, which managed to keep almost 85% of the 322 study participants on one of the three diets for the entire period, offers the hope that weight-loss diets can be tailored to personal preferences, without sacrificing efficacy, researchers say.

    "Several recent one-year dietary studies have led the American Diabetes Association to state in January 2008 that low-carb diets should be considered for a maximum of one year," lead author on the study, Dr Iris Shai (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel), told heartwire . "The current two-year study suggests that one low-fat diet doesn't fit all, meaning that the old paradigm should be reconsidered."

    Shai and colleagues publish the results of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) in the July 17, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine
Matti Narkia

Low-carb and Mediterranean diets beat low-fat for weight-loss, lipid changes at two yea... - 0 views

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    July 16, 2008 | Shelley Wood
    Beer-Sheva, Israel - Both a low-carbohydrate diet or a Mediterranean-style diet may be "effective alternatives" to a low-fat diet, with more favorable effects on lipids and/or glycemic control, new research suggests [1]. The two-year study, which managed to keep almost 85% of the 322 study participants on one of the three diets for the entire period, offers the hope that weight-loss diets can be tailored to personal preferences, without sacrificing efficacy, researchers say.

    "Several recent one-year dietary studies have led the American Diabetes Association to state in January 2008 that low-carb diets should be considered for a maximum of one year," lead author on the study, Dr Iris Shai (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel), told heartwire. "The current two-year study suggests that one low-fat diet doesn't fit all, meaning that the old paradigm should be reconsidered."

    Shai and colleagues publish the results of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) in the July 17, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Weight Loss with a Low-Carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or Low-Fat Diet - 0 views

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    Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet.
    Shai I, Schwarzfuchs D, Henkin Y, Shahar DR, Witkow S, Greenberg I, Golan R, Fraser D, Bolotin A, Vardi H, Tangi-Rozental O, Zuk-Ramot R, Sarusi B, Brickner D, Schwartz Z, Sheiner E, Marko R, Katorza E, Thiery J, Fiedler GM, Blüher M, Stumvoll M, Stampfer MJ; Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) Group.
    N Engl J Med. 2008 Jul 17;359(3):229-41.
    PMID: 18635428

    Conclusions Mediterranean and low-carbohydrate diets may be effective alternatives to low-fat diets. The more favorable effects on lipids (with the low-carbohydrate diet) and on glycemic control (with the Mediterranean diet) suggest that personal preferences and metabolic considerations might inform individualized tailoring of dietary interventions. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00160108 [ClinicalTrials.gov] .)
Matti Narkia

Whole Health Source: The Fructose Index is the New Glycemic Index - 0 views

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    Wednesday, November 19, 2008
    The Fructose Index is the New Glycemic Index
    I stumbled upon an interesting editorial recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition from Dr. Richard Johnson's group, entitled "How Safe is Fructose for Persons With or Without Diabetes?" It was a response to a meta-analysis in the same journal pronouncing fructose safe up to 90 grams per day. That's the amount in eight apples or four cans of soda. Not quite what our hunter-gatherer ancestors were eating! The editorial outlined the case against excessive fructose, which I feel is quite strong. That led me to another, more comprehensive paper from Dr. Johnson's group, which argues that the amount of fructose found in a food, which they call the "fructose index", is more relevant to health than the food's glycemic index.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D and diabetes: Improvement of glycemic control with vitamin D3 repletion -- Sc... - 0 views

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    Vitamin D and diabetes: improvement of glycemic control with vitamin D3 repletion.
    Schwalfenberg G.
    Can Fam Physician. 2008 Jun;54(6):864-6.
    PMID: 18556494

    Conclusion

    These cases support information that is already known about VTD and its effect on the islet cell. As discussed above, this might be true only for vitamin D3 and not vitamin D2, although vitamin D2 has been shown to improve bone health. Vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency is common, and repletion might improve glycemic control early in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is one of the fastest growing chronic diseases worldwide. Vitamin D3 is inexpensive and readily available. Well-designed clinical studies are required to ascertain if improving 25(OH)D levels from an insufficiency or deficiency to sufficiency improves glycemic control in diabetes. These studies need to be properly designed: a randomized controlled trial with VTD deficiency or insufficiency identified in diabetic patients of various ethnic
Matti Narkia

Baseline Serum 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Is Predictive of Future Glycemic Status and Insulin... - 0 views

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    Baseline serum 25-hydroxy vitamin d is predictive of future glycemic status and insulin resistance: the Medical Research Council Ely Prospective Study 1990-2000.
    Forouhi NG, Luan J, Cooper A, Boucher BJ, Wareham NJ.
    Diabetes. 2008 Oct;57(10):2619-25. Epub 2008 Jun 30.
    PMID: 18591391
    doi: 10.2337/db08-0593

    CONCLUSIONS: This prospective study reports inverse associations between baseline serum 25(OH)D and future glycemia and insulin resistance. These associations are potentially important in understanding the etiology of abnormal glucose metabolism and warrant investigation in larger, specifically designed prospective studies and randomized controlled trials of supplementation.
Matti Narkia

Supplementation with cholecalciferol does not improve glycaemic control in diabetic sub... - 0 views

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    Supplementation with cholecalciferol does not improve glycaemic control in diabetic subjects with normal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
    Jorde R, Figenschau Y.
    Eur J Nutr. 2009 Apr 16. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19370371
    10.1007/s00394-009-0020-3

    Conclusions We were not able to demonstrate that vitamin D supplementation had a significant effect on glucose metabolism in subjects with type 2 diabetes but without vitamin D deficiency. Further studies are needed in larger groups of subjects with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, who also exhibit low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
Matti Narkia

Response -- Schwalfenberg 53 (9): 1435 -- Canadian Family Physician - 0 views

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    Vitamin D supplementation.
    Eveleigh B.
    Can Fam Physician. 2007 Sep;53(9):1435; author reply 1435.
    PMID: 17872869

    My concern regarding vitamin D2 is that it is a synthetic analogue and might interact with the vitamin D receptor differently in various cell systems. It has been reported that vitamin D3 might improve glycemic control.7 Vitamin D2 has been reported to cause worsening of glycemic control in people of East Indian descent.8 Is this because of vitamin D receptor polymorphism, or because of enhanced 24-hydroxylase enzyme activation, or is it due to how vitamin D2 interacts with the receptor? Until this has been sorted out, I feel safest using vitamin D3. There are about 2000 synthetic analogues of vitamin D. The search is on for one that can cross the blood-brain barrier to treat certain types of brain cancers without causing hypercalcemia.9 But then again, what other effects would this compound have? There are still so many unknowns
Matti Narkia

The carnivore connection - evolutionary aspects of insulin resistance - Eur J Clin Nutr... - 0 views

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    The 'carnivore connection'--evolutionary aspects of insulin resistance.
    Colagiuri S, Brand Miller J.
    Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Mar;56 Suppl 1:S30-5. Review.
    PMID: 11965520
Matti Narkia

Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century -- ... - 0 views

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    Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century.
    Cordain L, Eaton SB, Sebastian A, Mann N, Lindeberg S, Watkins BA, O'Keefe JH, Brand-Miller J.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Feb;81(2):341-54. Review.
    PMID: 15699220
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