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Matti Narkia

Fish intake is associated with a reduced progression of coronary artery ather... - 0 views

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    Fish intake is associated with a reduced progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease.
    Erkkilä AT, Lichtenstein AH, Mozaffarian D, Herrington DM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Sep;80(3):626-32.
    PMID: 15321802

    Conclusions: Consumption of fish is associated with a significantly reduced progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis in women with coronary artery disease.
Matti Narkia

N-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Actions and Molecular Mechanisms - 0 views

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    n-3 Fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: actions and molecular mechanisms.
    Torrejon C, Jung UJ, Deckelbaum RJ.
    Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2007 Nov-Dec;77(5-6):319-26. Epub 2007 Dec 3. Review. Erratum in: Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2008 Feb;78(2):157.
    PMID: 18060753

    In conclusion, a growing body of evidence, encompassing human to cellular and molecular studies are defining the roles for n-3 FA as bioactive agents for reducing the risks of and treating CVD.
Matti Narkia

Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids is not associated with a reduction in carotid athero... - 0 views

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    Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids is not associated with a reduction in carotid atherosclerosis: the Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease in Alaska Natives study.
    Ebbesson SO, Roman MJ, Devereux RB, Kaufman D, Fabsitz RR, Maccluer JW, Dyke B, Laston S, Wenger CR, Comuzzie AG, Romenesko T, Ebbesson LO, Nobmann ED, Howard BV.
    Atherosclerosis. 2008 Aug;199(2):346-53. Epub 2007 Dec 4.
    PMID: 18054937
    doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2007.10.020

    Conclusions
    Dietary intake of omega-3 FAs in a moderate-to-high range does not appear to be associated with reduced plaque, but is negatively associated with IMT. The presence and extent of carotid atherosclerosis among Eskimos is higher with increasing consumption of saturated FAs.
Matti Narkia

Smoking trumps omega-3s to drive up atherosclerosis rates in Alaskan Eskimos - theheart... - 0 views

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    "July 10, 2008 | Shelley Wood

    New York, NY - Despite eating a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids, Alaskan Eskimo are developing subclinical atherosclerosis at an early age, likely due in large part to heavy smoking, a new study shows [1]. According to investigators, in a paper published online July 10, 2008 in Stroke, rates of carotid atherosclerosis in the mostly young to middle-aged subjects participating in the Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease in Alaska Natives (GOCADAN) study were significantly higher than those reported in US population-based studies of other ethnic groups.

    But as Dr Alexis Cutchins (Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY) and colleagues report, rates of current smoking among the Eskimo population studied were also four to six times higher than that of other US populations in similar studies.

    "I don't think there's anything very surprising here, but I guess what is novel is that the findings relate to a population that has not been studied much, if at all, in this regard," study coauthor Dr Mary J Roman (Weill Cornell Medical College) told heartwire. "And I think that the message is one that has public-health implications for everybody else: this is basically a reiteration of the fact that smoking is a very potent cardiovascular risk factor, and I think the indoctrination that most of us have received about the ills of smoking have clearly not penetrated the Alaska Eskimo population.""
Matti Narkia

Prevalence and Correlates of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Alaska Eskimos: The GOCADAN... - 0 views

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    Prevalence and correlates of subclinical atherosclerosis in Alaska Eskimos: the GOCADAN study.
    Cutchins A, Roman MJ, Devereux RB, Ebbesson SO, Umans JG, Zhu J, Weissman NJ, Howard BV.
    Stroke. 2008 Nov;39(11):3079-82. Epub 2008 Jul 10.
    PMID: 18617652
    doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.108.519199

    Conclusions- Alaska Eskimos have similar traditional risk factors for carotid atherosclerosis as other ethnic and racial populations but have higher prevalences of atherosclerosis, possibly attributable to higher rates of smoking.
Matti Narkia

Omega-3 rather than genetics is key to lack of CHD in Japanese? - theheart.org - 0 views

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    Pittsburgh, PA and Shiga, Japan - The low rate of atherosclerosis and heart disease in Japanese people may be related to their very high levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids rather than genetic factors, a new study suggests [1].

    The study, published in the August 5, 2008 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (available online July 28), was conducted by a group led by Dr Akira Sekikawa (University of Pittsburgh, PA, and Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan).

    They found that compared with white or Japanese American men living in the US, Japanese men living in Japan had twice the blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids-a finding that was independently linked to low levels of atherosclerosis.

    "The death rate from coronary heart disease in Japan has always been puzzlingly low. Our study suggests that the very low rates of coronary heart disease among Japanese living in Japan may be due to their lifelong high consumption of fish," Sekikawa said."

    Results showed that the Japanese men had the lowest levels of atherosclerosis, whereas whites and Japanese Americans had similar higher levels. The Japanese men also had twofold higher levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids than white and Japanese Americans.

    In addition, the significant differences between Japanese and American men in multivariable-adjusted IMT and CAC prevalence became nonsignificant after adjustment further for marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids.
Matti Narkia

Omega-3 Rather Than Genetics Is Key to Lack of CHD in Japanese? - Medscape - 0 views

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    July 29, 2008 - The low rate of atherosclerosis and heart disease in Japanese people may be related to their very high levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids rather than genetic factors, a new study suggests [1].

    The study, known as Electron-Beam Tomography, Risk Factor Assessment Among Japanese and US Men in the Post-World War II Birth Cohort (ERA JUMP) included 868 randomly selected men aged 40 to 49. Of these, 281 were Japanese men living in Japan; 306 were white men living in the US, and 281 were third- or fourth-generation Japanese American men from Hawaii. All study participants had a physical examination, completed a lifestyle questionnaire, and had blood tests to measure cholesterol levels and levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Atherosclerosis was assessed by measuring carotid intima-medial thickness (IMT) and coronary artery calcification (CAC).

    Results showed that the Japanese men had the lowest levels of atherosclerosis, whereas whites and Japanese Americans had similar higher levels. The Japanese men also had twofold higher levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids than white and Japanese Americans.

    The study, published in the August 5, 2008 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (available online July 28), was conducted by a group led by Dr Akira Sekikawa (University of Pittsburgh, PA, and Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan).

    They found that compared with white or Japanese American men living in the US, Japanese men living in Japan had twice the blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids - a finding that was independently linked to low levels of atherosclerosis.
Matti Narkia

Can lifestyle changes reverse coronary heart disease? : The Lancet - 0 views

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    Can lifestyle changes reverse coronary heart disease? The Lifestyle Heart Trial.
    Ornish D, Brown SE, Scherwitz LW, Billings JH, Armstrong WT, Ports TA, McLanahan SM, Kirkeeide RL, Brand RJ, Gould KL.
    Lancet. 1990 Jul 21;336(8708):129-33.
    PMID: 1973470
Matti Narkia

The Cholesterol Myths - 0 views

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    "The idea that too much animal fat and high cholesterol are dangerous to your heart and vessels is nothing but a myth. Here are some astonishing and frightening facts (see below)

    If you think this is written by another internet crackpot, take a look at Dr. Ravnskov's credentials and the reviews of his book.
Matti Narkia

ARBITER 6-HALTS: HDL raising with niacin superior to ezetimibe - 0 views

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    "Orlando, FL - Adding extended-release niacin (Niaspan, Abbott) to statin therapy results in a significant regression of atherosclerosis as measured by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), whereas the addition of ezetimibe (Zetia, Merck/Schering-Plough) to statin therapy did not, according to an eagerly anticipated study "
Matti Narkia

Animal Pharm: Benefits of High-Saturated Fat Diets (Part IV): REGRESSION IN HEART PATIENTS - 0 views

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    It was observed that in post-menopausal women with documented heart disease from the Estrogen Replacement and Atherosclerosis (ERA) trial, a multicenter clinical trial evaluating the effects of hormone replacement therapy on atherosclerotic progression, in the group consuming the highest-saturated dietary fat diet (12.0% Sat Fat), an enlargement in coronary diameter of 0.01 mm and a 0.1% regression in coronary artery stenosis
Matti Narkia

Effect of vitamin D deficiency and replacement on endothelial function in asymptomatic ... - 0 views

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    Effect of vitamin D deficiency and replacement on endothelial function in asymptomatic subjects.
    Tarcin O, Yavuz DG, Ozben B, Telli A, Velioglu Ogunc A, Yuksel M, Toprak A, Yazici D, Sancak S, Deyneli O, Akalin S.
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Jul 7. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19584181
    doi:10.1210/jc.2008-1212

    Conclusions: This study shows that 25(OH)D deficiency is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased lipid peroxidation. Replacement of vitamin D has favorable effects on endothelial function. Vitamin D deficiency can be seen as an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis. Hypovitaminosis D associated endothelial dysfunction may predispose to higher cardiovascular disease in the winter.
Matti Narkia

CLA-rich cheese may boost heart health: Study - 0 views

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    Consuming cheese from ewe's milk, rich in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), may reduce markers linked to heart disease, suggest results from a small Italian study.
    Researchers from the University of Florence report that ewe's milk rich in cis-9, trans-11 CLA produced favourable changes in inflammatory cytokines and platelet aggregation, both of which are associated with atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries due to the build-up of fatty deposits on artery walls.
Matti Narkia

Sloan-Kettering - Garlic - 0 views

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    Derived from the bulb or clove of the plant. Garlic is used as a spice and to treat hyperlipidemia, hypertension, atherosclerosis, cancer, and infections. Processing can have a substantial effect on the chemical content in garlic; the volatile oil components are sensitive to heat and certain enzymes are acid-labile. Several oral garlic formulations are available, and clinical studies have addressed a variety of the proposed claims. Placebo-controlled trials on the cholesterol lowering effect of garlic yielded mixed results (16) (17) (18) (21) (22) (26). Studies evaluating the antithrombotic effects repeatedly have shown modest reduction in platelet aggregation, but varying levels of fibrinolytic activity. Research shows mixed effects with regard to reductions in blood glucose, blood pressure, or risk of cardiovascular disease (23). Frequently reported adverse events include bad breath, headache, fatigue, GI upset, diarrhea, sweating, and possible hypoglycemia (9). Because garlic is known to decrease platelet aggregation and potentially elevate the INR, it should not be used with anticoagulants or in patients with platelet dysfunction (15). Garlic appears to induce cytochrome p450 3A4 and may enhance metabolism of many medications (e.g. cyclosporin and saquinavir) (12). An analysis of several case-control studies in Europe suggests an inverse association between garlic consumption and risk of common cancers (25).
Matti Narkia

Alternative Treatment Discovered for Lowering Triglycerides - 0 views

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    Studies done with laboratory rats suggest that supplementation of their diet with lipoic acid had a significant effect in lowering triglycerides.
Matti Narkia

The Two Faces of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Pathophysiology of Atheroscle... - 0 views

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    The two faces of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.
    Kawashima S.
    Endothelium. 2004 Mar-Apr;11(2):99-107. Review.
    PMID: 15370069
    DOI: 10.1080/10623320490482637
Matti Narkia

Dietary linolenic acid is inversely associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in... - 0 views

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    Dietary linolenic acid is inversely associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.
    Djoussé L, Arnett DK, Carr JJ, Eckfeldt JH, Hopkins PN, Province MA, Ellison RC; Investigators of the NHLBI FHS.
    Circulation. 2005 Jun 7;111(22):2921-6. Epub 2005 May 31.
    PMID: 15927976
    doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.104.489534
Matti Narkia

The Heart Scan Blog: Sterols should be outlawed - 0 views

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    While sterols occur naturally in small quantities in food (nuts, vegetables, oils), food manufacturers are adding them to processed foods in order to earn a "heart healthy" claim.

    The FDA approved a cholesterol-reducing indication for sterols , the American Heart Association recommends 200 mg per day as part of its Therapeutic Lifestyle Change diet, and WebMD gushes about the LDL-reducing benefits of sterols added to foods.


    Sterols--the same substance that, when absorbed to high levels into the blood in a genetic disorder called "sitosterolemia"--causes extravagant atherosclerosis in young people.

    The case against sterols, studies documenting its coronary disease- and valve disease-promoting effects, is building
Matti Narkia

Vitamin C-rich foods may boost artery health - 0 views

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    Increased intake of vitamin C-rich foods may reduce the risk of hardening of the arteries, and ultimately protect against heart disease, says a new study from Norway.\nWriting in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, researchers from Ulleval University Hospital in Norway report that increased intakes of vitamin C and fruit and berries were associated with less thickening of the carotid artery.
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