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News: New Zealand Primary School ditches Playground Rules - 38 views

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    No rules...in the playground...could it work? It works very well in New Zealand
Roland Gesthuizen

Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: 10 Proven Strategies to Break the Ban and Build ... - 60 views

  • The nice thing, however, about cell phones is that you don’t have to worry about distribution, collection, storage, imaging , and charging of devices. Consider working with your students to develop this plan, you may find that they build a strong, comprehensive policy of which they will take ownership and be more likely to follow.
  • Breaking the ban starts with the building of relationships with key constituents.
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    when it comes to preparing students for success in the 21st century you not only have to think outside the ban, sometimes you have to dive in head first and break it. The following is a collection of ideas each teacher implemented to successfully break and/or work within the ban where they teach in an effort to empower students with the freedom to use their cell phones as personal learning devices.
Roland Gesthuizen

The Great "Respect" Deception | Edutopia - 45 views

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    I define a rule as what you enforce every time it's broken. Platitudes cannot be enforced because there is no line to cross, there's nothing predictable for students to understand, and they're too vague to be useful. In essence, these clumps allow teachers to enforce anything whenever they want under any conditions they chose. It's a get into jail free card. Rules aren't reduced by clumping them -- they are only hidden from students. Often, the only way students can find the real lines is by crossing them. This encourages rule breaking rather than stopping it.
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    I define a rule as what you enforce every time it's broken. Platitudes cannot be enforced because there is no line to cross, there's nothing predictable for students to understand, and they're too vague to be useful. In essence, these clumps allow teachers to enforce anything whenever they want under any conditions they chose. It's a get into jail free card. Rules aren't reduced by clumping them -- they are only hidden from students. Often, the only way students can find the real lines is by crossing them. This encourages rule breaking rather than stopping it.
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    I find, however, that if you inundate students with rules and consequences, especially when they are the same rules every time, students view these as your expectations of their behavior. When they believe you expect the worst from them, they will rise to that expectation. Many rules teachers make are actually procedures, as defined by Henry Wong. If we teach procedures instead, and simply reteach the procedure every time it is not followed, they eventually get tired of being retaught the procedure and just do it. I think what some in education forget is that students, no matter what age, expect and deserve respect, too. If we consistently offer respect and dignity, even when we aren't receiving it in return, the rest of the class notices and responds in return. There need to be some rules that are clearly stated with real enforceable consequences. They need to be only a few and very important. Every professional work place has a few. But we also need to send the clear message that school, as preparing them for the workplace that will not have a100 page rule book, is where we are showing them a model of behavior that is *implicitly* expected in every segment of society.
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    "Because so many educators have come to believe the myth of "the fewer rules, the better" (which I was taught in my teacher training program), they have developed what I call deception clumps. They throw as many rules as possible into a respectably titled non-communicative clump:

    "
Roland Gesthuizen

13 Sacred Cows in Schools (and what to do about them) « Looking Up - 173 views

  • The aim is to start people thinking about those things we accept as part of schools, but no longer make sense
  • schools need to change, and quickly. The shift from standardization and conformity has already begun, and schools are too slow to respond
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    "Educators must look critically at the "sacred cows" in schools, the vestiges of industrial age thinking, and decide if they have any place in an education system that tries to foster independent thinking and individuality."
Peter Beens

Who Makes the Rules in a Classroom? Seven Ideas About Rule-making - Teacher in a Strang... - 83 views

  • What made collaborative rule-creation more effective in building a smoothly functioning class?
  • It never felt as if we were wrestling with the really important issues: Building a functioning community. Safety. Personal dignity. Kindness. Order. Academic integrity. Democracy.
  • No matter what rules you put on paper, your most important job is role-modeling those practices, not enforcing them
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  • On the other hand, do give clear instructions about what kids don't know. What to do when a tornado is spotted
  • Rules shouldn't restate the obvious. "No cheating" is a stupid rule. "Bring a pencil to class" is a silly rule.
  • You're shooting for influence, not control
  • Integrity helps build community. The most important directives in democratic classrooms are around ethical practices: A clear definition of cheating, understood by all students, in the digital age
  • Carrots and sticks are temporary nudges toward desirable behavior at best, but ultimately destructive
  • We want kids to behave appropriately because they understand that there are rewards for everyone in a civil, well-managed school.
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    Some guidelines for involving students in the creation of the class rules. 
Josh Flores

Brain Rules video | Brain Rules | - 121 views

    • Josh Flores
       
      Exercise boost brain function. Build stronger brains by incorporating exercise.
    • Josh Flores
       
      You cannot really multi-task.
    • Josh Flores
       
      Research why imagery is so important to incorporate into our learning.
Steve Ransom

FERPA and Social Media | Faculty Focus - 21 views

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    "FERPA cannot be interpreted as building a total and complete wall between the school and the community. We would have really bad schools if that happened and very disengaged students.
Chris Betcher

60 Second Science - 118 views

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    Great competition for science students
Kate Tabor

Ten rules for writing fiction | Books | guardian.co.uk - 42 views

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    Writers give advice - re: writing fiction - part 1
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