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Roland Gesthuizen

The Great "Respect" Deception | Edutopia - 45 views

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    I define a rule as what you enforce every time it's broken. Platitudes cannot be enforced because there is no line to cross, there's nothing predictable for students to understand, and they're too vague to be useful. In essence, these clumps allow teachers to enforce anything whenever they want under any conditions they chose. It's a get into jail free card. Rules aren't reduced by clumping them -- they are only hidden from students. Often, the only way students can find the real lines is by crossing them. This encourages rule breaking rather than stopping it.
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    I define a rule as what you enforce every time it's broken. Platitudes cannot be enforced because there is no line to cross, there's nothing predictable for students to understand, and they're too vague to be useful. In essence, these clumps allow teachers to enforce anything whenever they want under any conditions they chose. It's a get into jail free card. Rules aren't reduced by clumping them -- they are only hidden from students. Often, the only way students can find the real lines is by crossing them. This encourages rule breaking rather than stopping it.
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    I find, however, that if you inundate students with rules and consequences, especially when they are the same rules every time, students view these as your expectations of their behavior. When they believe you expect the worst from them, they will rise to that expectation. Many rules teachers make are actually procedures, as defined by Henry Wong. If we teach procedures instead, and simply reteach the procedure every time it is not followed, they eventually get tired of being retaught the procedure and just do it. I think what some in education forget is that students, no matter what age, expect and deserve respect, too. If we consistently offer respect and dignity, even when we aren't receiving it in return, the rest of the class notices and responds in return. There need to be some rules that are clearly stated with real enforceable consequences. They need to be only a few and very important. Every professional work place has a few. But we also need to send the clear message that school, as preparing them for the workplace that will not have a100 page rule book, is where we are showing them a model of behavior that is *implicitly* expected in every segment of society.
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    "Because so many educators have come to believe the myth of "the fewer rules, the better" (which I was taught in my teacher training program), they have developed what I call deception clumps. They throw as many rules as possible into a respectably titled non-communicative clump:

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Roland Gesthuizen

Behaviour reflections - Resources - TES - 13 views

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    "Behaviour reflections form based on form seen on lauracandler.com, but just updated in UK English spellings. May be useful to record a meeting with parents before a behaviour IEP is put into place."
Roland Gesthuizen

Teacher's Assistant Pro for iPad and iPhone - One of the Best Teacher Apps Around! - 193 views

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    Teacher's Assistant Pro was designed by a teacher for teachers to document student behavior and habits in the classroom.  Easily share your documentation with parents and administration via email.
Roland Gesthuizen

Check out the TeacherCast review of the app: Teachers Assistant Pro @cleveriosapps - 33 views

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    Teacher's Assistant Pro is an application built for the iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch designed to help teachers keep track of student discipline issues.  This app is customizable and easy to use.  If you are looking for a great way to organize all of your classes and if your administrators ask you to keep track of student behavior, this is the app for you. 

Roland Gesthuizen

Any human heart - feature - TES - 4 views

  • the majority of adults with mental-health problems first experienced them in childhood
  • the majority of adults with mental-health problems first experienced them in childhood
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    What to do when children use creativity to reveal horrors at home.
Roland Gesthuizen

Schools are key to safeguarding runaway children | Education | guardian.co.uk - 0 views

  • Schools, police, and care agencies are all required to collect data on runaways, but the information is often not pulled together effectively or properly exchanged between the services.
  • Schools are on the frontline of safeguarding these vulnerable children. Teachers are in a prime position to identify children who are upset, under stress or frequently missing school. These are the children who are most likely to run away from home.
  • For Stansfield, the "key issue" is that schools know who to call, and that they call them as soon it becomes clear that someone has run away, even if it has been for just a few hours, as this behaviour can "quickly spiral"
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    The Children's Society is calling for better training for teachers so they can help to identify children at risk of running away and take preventive action
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