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Martin Burrett

The Power of Scalextrics by @chrisbourne2win - 14 views

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    "During one of the standard visits to see family and friends recently, I came across a childhood game that had captured the imaginations of many a youngster in my generation…Scalextrics!

    A friend of mine had bought the classic car racing game for his five-year old son and I could not turn down the opportunity of a race…with the reasoning of showing my 11-month old daughter how it works ***cough, cough***."
Martin Burrett

Adolescents do not 'get the gist' when it comes to making risky decisions online - 18 views

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    "Adolescents are more likely than adults to take online risks, regardless of the gamble involved, according to new research by the University of Plymouth.

    The study, led by Claire White from the School of Psychology, was carried out to explore the psychological mechanisms underpinning why teenagers are more likely to take risks online when compared to young adults."
Martin Burrett

Session 315: Tips for dealing with disruptive pupils - 28 views

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    "The discussion begun which participants talking about what they viewed as disruption. Most people agreed that swinging on chairs, being late and calling out were disruptive to learning (although many felt that the root causes needed to be identified and addressed), but there was genuine disagreement about pupil interaction and banter with some UKEdChatters saying this was an inappropriate distraction, while others said they enjoyed and welcome this, at least to a point."
Roland Gesthuizen

Punitive Damages - 35 views

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    To punish kids, very simply, is to make something unpleasant happen to them -- or prevent them from experiencing something pleasant - usually with the goal of changing their future behavior.  The punisher makes them suffer, in other words, to teach them a lesson
Roland Gesthuizen

Parenting With Dignity - Reasons why punishment doesn't work - 26 views

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    Punishment guarantees a "push-back" response in all of the following situations:
    (A "push-back" response is simply the natural human resistance to change. Any time that one attempts to change a child's behavior the child will resist. Add punishment and you will insure more resistance to change.)
Roland Gesthuizen

8 Characteristics of the "Innovator's Mindset" | The Principal of Change - 45 views

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    "To be innovative, you have to look at yourself as an innovator first, and to create schools that embody this mindset as a "culture", we must develop this in individuals first."
Roland Gesthuizen

Behaviour - Every child needs the goalposts to be moved - news - TES - 49 views

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    "While consistency is important, students perform best when teachers tailor sanctions to the individual, not the behaviour"
C CC

UKEdMag: Speaking Up for the Introverted pupils - 24 views

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    Sshh
C CC

Behaviour in Schools - 31 views

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    Edtech to help improve behaviour in schools
C CC

Class Dojo Updates with Messaging - 22 views

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    Message parents about the behaviour of their children
Roland Gesthuizen

Don't Blame Social Media if Your Teen Is Unsocial. It's Your Fault | Wired Opinion | Wi... - 33 views

  • teenagers would love to socialize face-to-face with their friends. But adult society won’t let them. “Teens aren’t addicted to social media. They’re addicted to each other,” Boyd says. “They’re not allowed to hang out the way you and I did, so they’ve moved it online.”
  • today’s teens have neither the time nor the freedom to hang out. So their avid migration to social media is a rational response to a crazy situation. They’d rather socialize F2F, so long as it’s unstructured and away from grown-ups.
  • If you want your kids to learn valuable face-to-face skills, conquer your own irrational fears and give them more freedom. They want the same face-to-face intimacy you grew up with.
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    "Are teenagers losing their social skills? Parents and pundits seem to think so. Teens spend so much time online, we're told, that they're no longer able to handle the messy, intimate task of hanging out face-to-face .. Now, I'm not convinced this trend is real."
Roland Gesthuizen

Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: 10 Proven Strategies to Break the Ban and Build ... - 60 views

  • The nice thing, however, about cell phones is that you don’t have to worry about distribution, collection, storage, imaging , and charging of devices. Consider working with your students to develop this plan, you may find that they build a strong, comprehensive policy of which they will take ownership and be more likely to follow.
  • Breaking the ban starts with the building of relationships with key constituents.
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    when it comes to preparing students for success in the 21st century you not only have to think outside the ban, sometimes you have to dive in head first and break it. The following is a collection of ideas each teacher implemented to successfully break and/or work within the ban where they teach in an effort to empower students with the freedom to use their cell phones as personal learning devices.
Roland Gesthuizen

The Great "Respect" Deception | Edutopia - 46 views

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    I define a rule as what you enforce every time it's broken. Platitudes cannot be enforced because there is no line to cross, there's nothing predictable for students to understand, and they're too vague to be useful. In essence, these clumps allow teachers to enforce anything whenever they want under any conditions they chose. It's a get into jail free card. Rules aren't reduced by clumping them -- they are only hidden from students. Often, the only way students can find the real lines is by crossing them. This encourages rule breaking rather than stopping it.
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    I define a rule as what you enforce every time it's broken. Platitudes cannot be enforced because there is no line to cross, there's nothing predictable for students to understand, and they're too vague to be useful. In essence, these clumps allow teachers to enforce anything whenever they want under any conditions they chose. It's a get into jail free card. Rules aren't reduced by clumping them -- they are only hidden from students. Often, the only way students can find the real lines is by crossing them. This encourages rule breaking rather than stopping it.
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    I find, however, that if you inundate students with rules and consequences, especially when they are the same rules every time, students view these as your expectations of their behavior. When they believe you expect the worst from them, they will rise to that expectation. Many rules teachers make are actually procedures, as defined by Henry Wong. If we teach procedures instead, and simply reteach the procedure every time it is not followed, they eventually get tired of being retaught the procedure and just do it. I think what some in education forget is that students, no matter what age, expect and deserve respect, too. If we consistently offer respect and dignity, even when we aren't receiving it in return, the rest of the class notices and responds in return. There need to be some rules that are clearly stated with real enforceable consequences. They need to be only a few and very important. Every professional work place has a few. But we also need to send the clear message that school, as preparing them for the workplace that will not have a100 page rule book, is where we are showing them a model of behavior that is *implicitly* expected in every segment of society.
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    "Because so many educators have come to believe the myth of "the fewer rules, the better" (which I was taught in my teacher training program), they have developed what I call deception clumps. They throw as many rules as possible into a respectably titled non-communicative clump:

    "
Roland Gesthuizen

All Work and No Play: Why Your Kids Are More Anxious, Depressed - Esther Entin - The At... - 60 views

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    "For more than fifty years, children's free play time has been continually declining, and it's keeping them from turning into confident adults"
Roland Gesthuizen

Why The Brain Benefits From Reflection In Learning - 7 views

  • Students’ confidence will build further with their recognition of the strategies they used that brought them success.
  • much of the effort put into teaching and studying is wasted because students do not adequately process their experiences, nor are they given time to reflect upon them.
  • The degree to which one understands rests on the connections or relationships and the richness of these relationships.
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  • instruction that builds conceptual knowledge helps students’ link old knowledge with new knowledge, and this means providing time for reflection and communication
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    "Executive function stimulation: include questions in homework and tests that require mathematics communication. In addition to showing the steps used to solve a problem, when students are asked to explain their thinking and why they selected a procedure or what similar mathematics they related to when solving the problem, they are using more executive function.

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Martin Burrett

Bouncy Balls - Bounce balls with your mouse or microphone - 106 views

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    Want a new way of keeping your class quiet? Tell them not to make the balls bounce with this great resource.
    http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Classroom+Management+%26+Rewards
Roland Gesthuizen

Anti-Bullying Learning and Teaching Resource (ALTER) Catholic Education Office, Wollong... - 19 views

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    "Inspired and performed by students at three Catholic primary and secondary schools in the Diocese of Wollongong, this innovative video production uses their voice and experience to focus on the impact of bullying and provides practical strategies for youth to deal with this important issue. It is an engaging visual stimulus which challenges students to think positively, respond compassionately and act with courage when they are confronted with future incidents of bullying."
Roland Gesthuizen

Cyberbullying Victims | Grace King | Turn Computer... | Stuff.co.nz - 24 views

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    "I'm absolutely awed by the amount of positive feedback I have received about my last column on what it's like to be cyber-bullied. In saying that, I have also received many questions. There was one in particular that I have been asked by many, both my peers and adults; Why not just go offline? Turn off your computer, turn off your Facebook, go outside and forget about it."
Roland Gesthuizen

The 21st Century Principal: 5 Guidelines for Rational School Leader Response to Social ... - 48 views

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    What should be a school leader's response when a student uses social media in an inappropriate manner? This editorial .. makes the usual call for more rules and education about improper use of social media. But was this event a "social media problem" or was it "a behavioral or crime problem?" I think the answer to that question is at the heart of how a school leader should respond to a student's misuse of social media.
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