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Randolph Hollingsworth

Ivanhoe Game | A Praxis Program Project by graduate students in the UVa's Scholars' Lab - 27 views

Randolph Hollingsworth

Getting History in Tune | review of AHA Tuning Project's "Discipline Core" edwired - 16 views

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    Mills says the workgroup was not futuristic enough - need to think about what would the study of history become in the future given all the technological changes in sources and publications - weak on recent advances in digital humanities and needed to press more about ehtics and copyright
Roland Gesthuizen

What are the 4 R's Essential to 21st Century Learning? | HASTAC - 79 views

  • Interestingly, unlike math, which can often be difficult to teach in all of its abstraction, algorithms do stuff.   Algorithms are operational.  You show kids how to use a program like Scratch or Hackasaurus and, very soon, they can actually manipulate, create, and do, in their very own and special way.   
  • the beauty of teaching even the youngest kids algorithms and algorithmic or procedural thinking is that it gives them the same tool of agency and production that writing and even reading gave to industrial age learners who, for the first time in history, had access to cheap books and other forms of print.
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    Cathy Davidson discusses the need for a fourth "R" -pertaining to "algoRithim" - It is important, she argues, because, "in the 21st century, we need [an]...expanded push towards the literacy that defines our era, computational literacy.   Algorithms are as basic to the way the 21st century digital age works as reading, writing, and arithmetic were to the late 18th century Industrial era." 
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    "The classic "3 R's" of learning are, of course, Reading, 'Riting, and 'Rithmetic.  For the 21st century, we need to add a fourth R--and it will help inspire the other three:  Algorithm. "
Sandra Flowers

The (Coming) Social Media Revolution in the Academy - Daniels and Feagin - Fast Capital... - 6 views

  • Scholars now completing PhD’s have likely never known a world without the Internet and social media.
  • Ultimately, this technological transformation is going to have major implications on expert knowledge. The Internet increases voices and knowledge available to all. Elitism in the expert knowledge world is declining; the Internet democratizes knowledge building and use. Much more knowledge has become available, and the distinction between experts and ordinary folks, what Gramsci might have called “organic intellectuals,” is declining.
  • Academic bloggers frequently use blogs to keep up with the relevant literature in their field, thereby providing a kind of public note-taking and research-sharing exercise. Academic bloggers also use blogging as a rough draft for ideas they later develop fully for peer-reviewed papers or books.
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  • bloggers have embraced Internet technologies in ways that broaden the scope of their research work beyond college walls and in ways reaching beyond old disciplinary silos. This is partly about reaching audiences in disparate geographic locations
  • Academics, like others who use Twitter, have found short updates a useful way to find and maintain connections to others who share their research and other interests
  • For academics that may toil in relative isolation from others who share their immediate interests, the social connection of blogging and microblogging can also provide an opportunity to curate the ideal academic department.  While in another era, scholars may have identified strongly with their PhD-granting university, the college or university, or the academic department in which they are currently employed, the rise of social media allows for a new arrangement of colleagues.
  • Our colleagues in the humanities have embraced digital technologies much more readily than those of us in sociology or the social sciences more generally.  A casual survey of the blogosphere reveals that those in the humanities (and law schools) are much more likely to maintain academic blogs than social scientists.  In terms of scholarship, humanities scholars have been, for more than ten years, innovating ways to combine traditional scholarship with digital technologies.
  • scholars in English have established a searchable online database of the papers of Emily Dickinson and historians have developed a site that offers a 3D digital model showing the urban development of ancient Rome in A.D. 320.
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    Great article on coming changes in digital scholarship.
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