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Contents contributed and discussions participated by paul lowe

paul lowe

A report says universities' use of virtual technologies is 'patchy' | Education | The G... - 1 views

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    The "Google generation" of today's students has grown up in a digital world. Most are completely au fait with the microblogging site Twitter; they organise their social lives through Facebook and MySpace; 75% of students have a profile on at least one social networking site. And they spend up to four hours a day online. Modern students are happy to share and participate but are prone to impatience - being used to quick answers - and are casual about evaluating information and attributing it, and also about legal and copyright issues. With almost weekly developments in technology and research added to increasingly web-savvy students' expectations, how are British universities keeping up? Pretty well, according to Sir David Melville, chair of Lifelong Learning UK and author of a new report into how students' use of new technologies will affect higher education.
Bill Guinee

Diigo in College/University - 248 views

education diigo
started by Bill Guinee on 10 Apr 09 no follow-up yet
  • paul lowe
     
    hi
    we use diigo in our masters in photojournalism and documentary photography as a dynamic way of sharing links etc, and for group collaborative research projects where we set up a tag for the project and then get the class to add links, then divide the material up between the class and get each studnet to read x no of articles and then write a summary of each, then share that with the rest of the class, so very quickly the whole group get a goods sense of the research out there on the web

    this is mike wesch's approach to purpose driven research, where he uses a whole variety of social learnign tools to co research with his class, see the links here for more on his social anthropology course at kansas
    http://www.diigo.com/user/mapjdlinks/wesch



    Bill Guinee wrote:
    > This is exactly the kind of thing I am talking about -- my field is anthropology, and the idea of students generating and evaluating knowledge cooperatively in this way is very intriguing. I would love to hear more about exactly how you are doing this, the kinds of assignments, and so forth.
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    > Thomas Brown wrote:
    > > Bill Guinee wrote:
    > > > Does anyone know if there are any groups or resources specifically aimed at using Diigo for collaborative learning, researching and other goals in college or university classes. While there is much in this group that is of value to all teachers willing to experiment, there are also some differences between the higher education classes and the majority of what is being discussed here. As a newcomer to Diigo, I could use some help with this.
    > >
    > >
    > > I'm using Diigo in an Intro to Sociology college course. Collaborative group research online replaces the traditional textbook. Students research the concepts and write them up themselves. If anyone else is doing this, or wants to, let's start a new group.
paul lowe

The Wealth of Networks » Chapter 1: Introduction: A Moment of Opportunity and... - 0 views

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    Yochai Benkler's wealth of nations book online Next Chapter: Part I: The Networked Information Economy » read paragraph Chapter 1: Introduction: A Moment of Opportunity and Challenge 1 Information, knowledge, and culture are central to human freedom and human development. How they are produced and exchanged in our society critically affects the way we see the state of the world as it is and might be; who decides these questions; and how we, as societies and polities, come to understand what can and ought to be done. For more than 150 years, modern complex democracies have depended in large measure on an industrial information economy for these basic functions. In the past decade and a half, we have begun to see a radical change in the organization of information production. Enabled by technological change, we are beginning to see a series of economic, social, and cultural adaptations that make possible a radical transformation of how we make the information environment we occupy as autonomous individuals, citizens, and members of cultural and social groups. It seems passé today to speak of "the Internet revolution." In some academic circles, it is positively naïve. But it should not be. The change brought about by the networked information environment is deep. It is structural. It goes to the very foundations of how liberal markets and liberal democracies have coevolved for almost two centuries.
paul lowe

Anthropology Program at Kansas State University - Wesch - 0 views

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    Dubbed "the explainer" by Wired magazine, Michael Wesch is a cultural anthropologist exploring the impact of new media on society and culture. After two years studying the impact of writing on a remote indigenous culture in the rain forest of Papua New Guinea, he has turned his attention to the effects of social media and digital technology on global society. His videos on culture, technology, education, and information have been viewed by millions, translated in over ten languages, and are frequently featured at international film festivals and major academic conferences worldwide. Wesch has won several major awards for his work, including a Wired Magazine Rave Award, the John Culkin Award for Outstanding Praxis in Media Ecology, and he was recently named an Emerging Explorer by National Geographic. He has also won several teaching awards, including the 2008 CASE/Carnegie U.S. Professor of the Year for Doctoral and Research Universities.
paul lowe

YouTube - The Anonymity Project - Spring 2009 Digital Ethnography Preview - 0 views

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    For the Spring 2009 Digital Ethnography course led by Michael Wesch. This is a compilation of trailers created by students for their Spring 2009 projects. For more information about our project, visit our research hub: http://www.netvibes.com/wesch There you will find links to student blogs, our wiki, our diigo links, notes, and other materials.
paul lowe

NMC Discussion - Digital Ethnography - 1 views

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    mike wesc purpose driven research project on anonymity kansas uni ethnography/social anthropology on web 2.0 trends
paul lowe

Mediated Cultures: Digital Ethnography at Kansas State University - 1 views

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    Mediated Cultures: Digital Ethnography at Kansas State University netvibes site for mike wesch's course using rss feeds etc
paul lowe

Technology Dictionary - 3 views

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    Our Technology Dictionary has over 14,000 technology and computer related terms. The Technology Dictionary consists of definitions of IT and computer terms including but not limited to programming languages, software, hardware, operating systems, networking, mathematics, telecomunications, electronics, and more. The Technology Dictionary is based on the FOLDOC (The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing) compiled and maintained by Denis Howe. We add new definitions to our dictionary daily, and if you want to contribute something, don't hesitate to contact us. If you like the site bookmark it and tell your friends about it.
paul lowe

Web 2.0 Storytelling: Emergence of a New Genre (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE CONNECT - 3 views

  • A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid—perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that’s what a story used to be, and that’s how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
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    A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid-perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that's what a story used to be, and that's how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
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