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Steve Kelly

What would an exceptional middle and high school computer science curriculum include? -... - 48 views

  • What would an exceptional middle and high school computer science curriculum include?
  • This isn't a complete answer, but one thing the very first introductory classes should require is that the students turn off all their electronic computers and actually learn to walk through  algorithms with a computer that exists only on paper. (Or, I suppose, a whiteboard or a simulator.) This exercise would give the students a grounding in what is going on inside the computer as a very low level.

    My first computer programming class in my Freshman year of high school was completely on paper. Although it was done because the school didn't have much money, it turned out to be very beneficial.

    Another class I had in high school, that wouldn't normally be lumped into a Computer Science curriculum but has been a boon to my career, was good old Typing 101.
  • If you followed the CS Unplugged curriculum your students would know more about CS than most CS grads:

    http://csunplugged.org

    It's a really great intro to basic computer science concepts and very easy for students to understand.  Best of all you don't even need a computer per student if your school doesn't have the budget,
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  • For younger students, I think that the ability to make something professional-looking, like a real grown-up would, is paramount.  Sadly, I think this means that LOGO and BASIC aren't much use any more*.
  • So, we have a few choices.  You can try to write phone apps that look just like real phone apps, design interactive websites that look just like real interactive websites, or do something with embedded systems / robotics.  Avoid the temptation to make these things into group projects; the main thing every student needs to experience is the process of writing code, running it, debugging it, and watching the machine react to every command.
  • It is important to consider what an 11 to 18-year old is familiar with in terms of mathematics and logical thinking. An average 11-year old is probably learning about fractions, simple cartesian geometry, the concept of units, and mathematical expressions. By 15, the average student will be taking algebra, and hopefully will have the all-important concept of variables under his/her belt. So much in CS is dependent on solid understanding that symbols and tokens can represent abstract concepts, values, or algorithms. Without it, it's still possible to teach CS, but it must be done in a very different way (see Scratch).
  • At this point, concepts such as variables, parenthesis matching, and functions (of the mathematical variety) are within easy reach. Concepts like parameter passing, strings and collections, and program flow should be teachable. More advanced concepts such as recursion, references and pointers, certain data structures, and big-O may be very difficult to teach without first going through some more foundational math.
  • I tend to agree strongly with those that believe a foundational education should inspire interest and enforce concepts and critical thinking over teaching any specific language, framework, system, or dogma.
  • The key is that the concepts in CS aren't just there for the hell of it. Everything was motivated by a real problem, and few things are more satisfying than fixing something you really want to work with a cool technique or concept you just learned.
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    Great resource for teachers (especially those of us not initially trained in Computer Science) about what should 'count' as Computer Science.  Worth the read!
Roland Gesthuizen

When the Computer Takes Over for the Teacher - The Atlantic - 9 views

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    When kids can get their lessons from the Internet, what's left for classroom instructors to do? The Deconstruction of the K-12 Teacher is something we need to discuss amongst each other now.
C CC

Codecast - 0 views

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    A simple HTML/CSS editor which updates in real-time. Perfect for teaching to a class on your whiteboard or for students to experiment with.
barbbatch

The Work Buzz | 7 tips for improving email etiquette - 40 views

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    ccording to 2009 research from international consulting firm Deloitte, the average office worker sends around 160 emails and checks his or her inbox more than 50 times per day. If practice really made perfect, we'd all be Olympic gold medal-winning emailers by now.

robert morris

Active Learning Leads to Higher Grades and Fewer Failing Students in Science, Math, and... - 45 views

  • 1. Students in a traditional lecture course are 1.5 times more likely to fail, compared to students in courses with active learning
mrsdvorakravitz

Template Copy- Computer Lab Lessons - Google Docs - 13 views

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    computer lab lessons
C CC

Feature: Computer Science Competition Encourages Pupil Ideas - 11 views

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    Encouraging pupils to develop computer science ideas
Randolph Hollingsworth

CrowdGrader: Crowdsourcing the Evaluation of Homework Assignments - 57 views

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    Article on how their new crowdsourced grading platform worked for Computer Science students
Don Doehla

Small Byte #2-Scrible | Fluency21 - Committed Sardine Blog - 21 views

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    Scribble is a great tool for preparing web-based readings for engaging students more attentively in their inquiry. Great tool to support close reading and CCSS.

    Scrible is a free online tool for saving, organizing, annotating, and sharing websites for online research projects and web quests. It saves a copy of each page you annotate in your personal Scrible library, so that even if the original web pages you've made notes on go down, your saved pages and your notes still exist. You can post your work on Facebook or Twitter, and you can also share your Scrible pages with short links that you generate with the click of a button. Check it out for yourself at www.scrible.com.
psmiley

Reading, writing and computer coding -- the basics of the future | eCampus News - 53 views

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    Basic ed skills
Jennie Snyder

Schools seeking best digital tools | SeacoastOnline.com - 65 views

  • The most obvious takeaway, he said, was that "the age of the computer lab is kind of out," in which students travel out of their classrooms to log on.
  • The idea kids can access tools for learning 24 hours a day and can access learning not bound by the walls of the school is critical," Hobbs said. "It's indicative of what we mean by a 21st-century education."
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    Great quote: "The age of the computer lab is kind of out." Move toward to mobile devices and digital tools.
Steve Ransom

NCTE Position Statement on Machine Scoring - 9 views

  • Conclusions that computers can score as well as humans are the result of humans being trained to score like the computers (for example, being told not to make judgments on the accuracy of information). 
  • Computer scoring systems can be "gamed" because they are poor at working with human language, further weakening the validity of their assessments and separating students not on the basis of writing ability but on whether they know and can use machine-tricking strategies.
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    Important and well written
Christian King

Code.org | Dedicated to growing computer programming education - 1 views

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    A non-profit dedicated to providing tools for educators and links students to schools that offer programming courses.
Tanya Hudson

High Tech- Low Budget Technology Options For The Music Classroom - MusicEdMagic.com - 78 views

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    A large and growing list of free or low cost software and hardware alternatives that music educators can use in their classrooms instead of the high priced commercial stuff.
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    Huge compilation of links to technology for music teachers!
gomez nunez

DarwinTunes | Survival of the funkiest - 42 views

shared by gomez nunez on 21 Jun 12 - Cached
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    Listen to music as it evolves on the computer
Roland O'Daniel

Dumbing Down : Stager-to-Go - 3 views

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    Coincidentally, I wondered in 1996 why we were investing so heavenly in ensuring that we create a generation of fifth graders with terrific secretarial skills?
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