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Siri Anderson

Disruptive Innovation in Schools From Inside Out - Not Outside In | A Space for Learning - 28 views

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    How will schools evolve in relation to the disruptive change inspired by expansive availability of informal learning networks? This blog post shares some considerations around the maker space movement.
Nigel Coutts

Lessons from iWoz and Creating Innovators - 48 views

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    Lessons for teaching and learning in iWoz by Steve Wozniak and Creating Innovators by Tony Wagner
Roland Gesthuizen

8 Characteristics of the "Innovator's Mindset" | The Principal of Change - 45 views

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    "To be innovative, you have to look at yourself as an innovator first, and to create schools that embody this mindset as a "culture", we must develop this in individuals first."
Amy Burns

Group Brainstorming Tools | Home - GroupMap - 73 views

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    I am really excited about this tool! Thank you for sharing. The templates are wonderful!
Matt Renwick

Why Is Innovation So Hard? - 47 views

  • How does innovation occur?  Through an inefficient process of ideation, exploration, and experimentation.
  • we create new value by combining seemingly unrelated things or ideas in new ways, transferring something from one environment to another, or finding new insights in patterns or aberrations. Innovative ideas rarely emerge from an “aha!” moment. Instead, they usually arise from thinking differently than we normally think and from learning.
  • we are highly efficient, fast, reflexive thinkers who seek to confirm what we already know.
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  • we are cognitively blind to disconfirming data and challenging ideas.
  • To innovate, people have to take their normal thinking to a much higher level. Most of us have to be taught how to do that.
  • Fear of failure, fear of looking bad, and fear of losing our job if we make mistakes all can lead to what Chris Argyris called “defensive reasoning”: the tendency to defend what we believe. This makes it hard to get outside of ourselves in order to “think out of the box.”
  • most organizations exist to produce predictable, reliable, standardized results. In those environments, mistakes and failures are bad.
  • To innovate, you must simultaneously tolerate mistakes and insist on operational excellence.
  • Humility, empathy, and the devaluation of hierarchical rank were critical to making this new culture work.
Roy Sovis

10 Breakthrough Innovations That Will Shape The World In 2025 | Global Digital Citizen ... - 33 views

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    "10 Breakthrough Innovations That Will Shape The World In 2025"
Jennie Snyder

Atul Gawande: How Do Good Ideas Spread? : The New Yorker - 37 views

  • But, step by step, Sister Seema had helped her to do it. “She showed me how to get things done practically,” the nurse said.
  • “Why did you listen to her?” I asked. “She had only a fraction of your experience.”
  • “It wasn’t like talking to someone who was trying to find mistakes,” she said. “It was like talking to a friend.”
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    Great article on why some innovations spread quickly and others take more time. 
Jennie Snyder

Beginner's Guide to K-12 Design Thinking - LiveBinder - 58 views

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    LiveBinder with resources on Design Thinking in K-12 Education
Jennie Snyder

Design Thinking in Schools: An Emerging Movement Building Creative Confidence in our Yo... - 46 views

  • design thinking is a set of tools, methods, and processes by which we develop new answers for challenges, big and small.
  • Through applying design thinking to challenges, we learn to define problems, understand needs and constraints, brainstorm innovative solutions, and seek and incorporate feedback about our ideas in order to continually make them better. The more we apply design thinking to the challenges we see, the deeper we strengthen the belief in our ability to generate creative ideas and make positive change happen in the world.
  • If you are interested in finding a program or resources to help integrate design thinking in your school, the directory offers a great set of organizations already listed for inspiration and new connections.
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  • We are living in an age of increased complexity, and are facing global challenges at an unprecedented scale. The nature of connectivity, interactivity, and information is changing at lightening speed. We need to enable a generation of leaders who believe they can make a difference in the world around them, because we need this generation to build new systems and rebuild declining ones. We need them to be great collaborators, great communicators, and great innovators.
  • As we help today’s students build their foundation of core academic knowledge and skills, we also need to look at the ways we are helping our youth build their confidence in their abilities to create.
Jennie Snyder

Creativity is rejected: Teachers and bosses don't value out-of-the-box thinking. - 47 views

  • This is the thing about creativity that is rarely acknowledged: Most people don’t actually like it. Studies confirm what many creative people have suspected all along: People are biased against creative thinking, despite all of their insistence otherwise.
  • Staw says most people are risk-averse. He refers to them as satisfiers.
  • Satisfiers avoid stirring things up, even if it means forsaking the truth or rejecting a good idea.
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  • Uncertainty is an inherent part of new ideas, and it’s also something that most people would do almost anything to avoid. People’s partiality toward certainty biases them against creative ideas and can interfere with their ability to even recognize creative ideas.
  • Unfortunately, the place where our first creative ideas go to die is the place that should be most open to them—school. Studies show that teachers overwhelmingly discriminate against creative students, favoring their satisfier classmates who more readily follow directions and do what they’re told.
  • It’s ironic that even as children are taught the accomplishments of the world’s most innovative minds, their own creativity is being squelched.
  • All of this negativity isn’t easy to digest, and social rejection can be painful in some of the same ways physical pain hurts. But there is a glimmer of hope in all of this rejection. A Cornell study makes the case that social rejection is not actually bad for the creative process—and can even facilitate it.
  • Truly creative ideas take a very long time to be accepted. The better the idea, the longer it might take.
  • Most people agree that what distinguishes those who become famously creative is their resilience. While creativity at times is very rewarding, it is not about happiness. Staw says a successful creative person is someone “who can survive conformity pressures and be impervious to social pressure.”
  • To live creatively is a choice.
  • You have to let go of satisfying people, often even yourself.
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    We say we like creativity, but we really don't. Thoughtful post on the resistance to creative thinking.
Jennie Snyder

Dear Karl, Scott, Daniel, and John : The Future You Predicted Seems Right On Schedule |... - 40 views

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    Thoughtful post by Pam Moran on the skills and competencies our students need for future success. In it, she argues that the future is now and that we, as educators, need to rethink and redesign how we prepare students for their future. Must read.
Maureen Greenbaum

Calls from Washington for streamlined regulation and emerging models | Inside Higher Ed - 0 views

  • more of online “innovations” like competency-based education.
  • reauthorization of the Higher Education Act might shake out.
  • flow of federal financial aid to a wide range of course providers, some of which look nothing like colleges.
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  • give state regulators a new option to either act as accreditors or create their own accreditation systems.
  • “States could accredit online courses, or hybrid models with elements on- and off-campus.”
  • any new money for those emerging models would likely come out of the coffers of traditional colleges.
  • cut back on red tape that prevents colleges from experimenting with ways to cut prices and boost student learning.
  • decentralized, more streamlined form of accreditation.
  • regional accreditors are doing a fairly good job. They are under enormous pressure to keep “bad actors” at bay while also encouraging experimentation. And he said accreditors usually get it right.
  • Andrew Kelly, however, likes Lee’s idea. Kelly, who is director of the American Enterprise Institute’s Center on Higher Education Reform, said it would create a credible alternative to the existing accreditation system, which the bill would leave intact.
  • eliminating bureaucracy in higher education regulation is a top priority
  • “Accreditation could also be available to specialized programs, individual courses, apprenticeships, professional credentialing and even competency-based tests,”
  • “The gateway to education reform is education oversight reform,”
  • broad, bipartisan agreement that federal aid policies have not kept pace with new approaches to higher education.
  • expansion of competency-based education. And he said the federal rules governing financial aid make it hard for colleges to go big with those programs.
  • accreditors is that they favor the status quo, in part because they are membership organizations of academics that essentially practice self-regulation.
  • “The technology has reached the point where it really can improve learning,” he said, adding that “it can lower the costs.”
  • changes to the existing accreditation system that might make it easier for competency-based and other emerging forms of online education to spread.
  • offering competency-based degrees through a process called direct assessment, which is completely de-coupled from the credit-hour standard.
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