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Kevin Stranack

Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide' - The Chronicle Review - The Chr... - 26 views

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    Text from 2011, still extremely timely, about privacy. The author, professor of Law, deconstructs the "nothing to hide" argument that says that we should not be scared to disclose private activities or information when we do nothing wrong.
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    Excellent, thanks for this. The "nothing to hide" argument also rests on the absurd premise that the authorities all have pure motives and will not abuse their power with this level of access to private information. To assume that all authorities, everywhere, all have noble intentions and pure motives is absurd as assuming that all human being are perfect....
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    Even though it is a few years old, the topic is still relevant--and maybe even more so in the wake of Snowden. Although most of us do truly believe we have 'nothing to hide', we are all naively unaware of just how easily something innocent can be twisted to nefarious means. At the same time, if we are all being watched, are any of us really being watched? Something to ponder.
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    The big problem is the concept of privacy. In Brazilian law we have three kinds of personal information (data): public, private, and restricted. The difference between public and private information is matter of personal choice, in others words, each one may decide what is matter of the public or private information. The restricted informations are those that we are required by law to give the government, but the government cannot disclose without authorization. The privacy issue is respect for this choice between private and public data. When government or anybody disrespects this choice, we have a problem. I think in virtual ambience the users ignore those distinctions and make a big mess. If in one hand government and big players have been stealing our data, in other hand the users don't have necessary care about his own private information.
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    "Nothing to hide as at now" might be correct as a current status but not for the future. Human beings we always behave like we have control of our future. I may have nothing to hide as at now but in 10 years time when I ran for political office my past will surely halt me.
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    True, however our real name / our real identity, if used consistently across the variety of online audiences we engage with, permits Big Data to be aggregated, defining our activity as a distinct entity, giving it greater value in the analytics marketplace -- whether we have anything to hide or not ... What price do you wish to place on your digital self as an online product is the real question.
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    Makes a great point. I used to think that way, if I have nothing to hide I don't have to worry about what others find about me. But is true there is no need for everyone to have access to every single detail about you. And the point Kim and Philip made is really important, with more information available and more companies interested in making profit of it becomes more difficult to maintain control of who access your information and what it is used for.
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    The article raises two important points: (1) the right to know how information is being used and (2) the right to correct incorrect inferences being made from sometimes an incomplete information sets. I begin with the assumption that,despite how I take care to protect information, there are individuals and institutions that will find ways of dong so. So I want the right to appeal and set the record straight.
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    This would be a good addition to the next addition of our core reading list.
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    Thank you for sharing this. I can agree on that even though we have nothing to hide, it is matter of violating our right to keep it to our selves. However, I can say that it people's opinion for public-surveillance cameras in cities and towns may be different. The cameras may have good usage in order to solve or prevent crimes. It depends on how it is used I guess.
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    I like to differentiate 'privacy' which is a right every human should have, from 'privatisation' which is corporate mandates that suggest the right to hide or share information - mostly based in monetization. Technology has given us access to each other in ways never imagined, and until humanity reaches a higher order of compassion toward and consciousness with each other, this issue will eat at the very fabric of our society until our security obsessions destroy us.
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    Thanks for your sharing. The example of the government has installed millions of public-surveillance cameras in cities and towns, which are watched by officials via closed-circuit television in Britain makes me reflect on two aspects. Firstly, in my personal opinion, I think public-surveillance cameras provide citizens a better sense of security especially during nights. Secondly, the key point here is how the officials deal with the documentation of public-surveillance cameras, will citizens' privacy be exposed to public?
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    "With regard to individual rights,.... there exists a private domain in man which should not be regulated or violated. This realm constitutes what is deepest, highest, and most valuable in the individual human being." http://rebirthofreason.com/Articles/Younkins/Social_Cooperation,_Flourishing,_and_Happiness.shtml
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    Privacy off course matters.It is right that if I have not done anything wrong then why should I hide it. On other hand we can not share our family relationship information with anyone.
w_kwai

Harvard University admits to secretly photographing students - 11 views

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    I think, its really an expensive and unnecessary experiments, if the attendance of Harvard University is low, then they have to come up with different rule to attract the interest of students. Cameras should be there for security, but not for surveillance.
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    Similar example to what Adobe software has done with collecting information…users/students seem to have to accept this "new-normal" of spying, etc.
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    I agree. Cameras should be there for security, not for surveillance. But just like the Adobe software, before we use it we have to "agree" on its' terms. I believe very few actually read those agreements, because we have to use the software, "agreeing" on those terms might just be "agreeing" on allowing them to collect our information. I live in Vancouver, BC. I know there are people who dislike the idea of the buses with cameras. I personally like that idea, it makes me feel like I am protected. When I was in high school in Victoria, BC, I feel safe taking the taxi even when it is late, because they have cameras in every one of them. When I was in Hong Kong, I feel insecure taking a taxi even when it is noon. So even if some of our information or our identity is given away, I agree on the idea of having cameras on buses and taxi's. I wonder if there is a gender difference on this, and there is also a gender gap of taxi drivers, maybe that is also why I personally feel insecure. Back to the point, if the purpose of cameras is for security, I agree to that. If it is for surveillance, I do not think it is essential; referring to the Harvard University attendance, at least they should inform the students about it.
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    This line caught my eye: "The study was approved by the US federally mandated Institutional Review Board, which assesses research and determined that the study "did not constitute human subjects research" and therefore did not require prior permission from those captured by the study." I have been debating with my own campus IRB over what constitutes human subjects research and what doesn't--they seem to be operating under the idea that if it's not invasive medical studies involving blood or drugs, it's not really human subjects. I think the issue in this Harvard study is that the IRB also has a clause that if you are collecting data in public spaces and not interacting with the people there, it doesn't require IRB approval; the question is whether these classrooms should be considered public spaces. My feeling is they aren't--in order to be in a room at a particular time, a person has to have chosen to attend that class, and within college classes it is assumed that the students can know that what they say is to some extent private among their classmates and professor. Even if the photos were destroyed after analysis, the fact remains that there were cameras inside what I would consider private spaces, without the consent of the people doing what they might feel is dangerous work (given the current assault on public intellectuals and academic freedom). My guess is that Harvard could easily have asked all the relevant parties to sign consent forms at the beginning of a semester but not indicated on which days they would be filming--people would probably continue doing what they normally do either way, but at least would have the option of asking not to be filmed. There's always a way to set up an area in a lecture hall where the cameras couldn't reach, so students who didn't want to be on film could opt out.
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    Thank you so much for sharing this article, I meant to read it a few days ago and got side-tracked!
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    Thanks for sharing this! I have mixed feelings about this article. At first, I was super opposed to the whole initiative Harvard did to their students because I would feel that my privacy has been violated completely, but after realizing that there are many more subtler forms of violations in privacy online (social media sites, tracking cookies etc.) I wasn't as opposed to the article. Although initially, students were not informed about their surveillance, there were told in the aftermath, and their information was destroyed. When using social media sites or installing new applications, there are terms of agreement before continuing on with the installation in which personally I don't read at all. Those terms and conditions have statements inside which notify us of tracking personal information which I have not read earlier but am still not opposed to giving. The information is probably sold to advertisers and we're probably not aware of it but we still give them the information via the signup of the program. Hence, even though there are contradictory views and feelings about their initiatives, we should be more aware and cautious of other forms of surveillance when we sign up for things (e.g. social media sites etc.)
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    Thank you for sharing. This does raise some concern. I guess there may be good and bad with cameras installed in the school. The cameras installed without students' consents may be violating their privacy and rights. However, it may prevent wrong doings, i guess. When my friend was doing final exam, the prof asked the whole class to put their belongings in front of the classroom, but when he went to pick up his stuff after he was finished, his bag was missing. Through the security camera, they were able to see who stole his stuff.
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    Did any body else remember George Orwell's novel (1984). By accepting this type of behavior we accepting the image of a holly power that is ethical, care and neutral. Does this exist? and who will monitor the observers?
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    I think this is a really good point, who will monitor the observers? What kind of power do those people hold and what are they doing with all those information? It makes people uncomfortable.
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    Interesting news! It's surprising to get to know that Harvard University places cameras without letting students know, photographs them during lectures to measure attendance. This reminds me of my high school in China. When I was in high school, I remember that cameras were installed at the back of every classroom to prevent students from distraction in class or cheating during exams. It mainly worked as threatening students, from my understanding. Because you never know when the camera will be opened, actually, it never opened. What happened in Harvard University just reminded me of that, which is quite satiric.
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    Thanks for sharing this article. In my personal opinion, I think the action of secretly installed the cameras from Harvard University violates students' privacy. If it's just for measuring classroom attendance, I think Harvard University could definitely find a much better way instead of installing the camera.
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    wondering if this would be a different conversation if the cameras were just picking up heat signals so that the identity of the people could not be known but they could still be counted. The technology is pretty basic and it might even be more efficient than the way they're using them now.
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    Can't believe Harvard can do this thing. I think informations are sharing and revealing on internet or others more and more serious. Harvard shouldn't secretly photograph students, they should ask permission first.
Kaitie Warren

Freedom of expression toolkit: a guide for students - 0 views

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    UNESCO Resource exploring the four key elements of freedom of expression: the right to hold opinions without interference, the right to seek information, the right to receive information, and the right to impart information to others. These are all important pieces of access to open knowledge. 
Kevin Stranack

The Lyon Declaration - 3 views

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    "Increased access to information and knowledge, underpinned by universal literacy, is an essential pillar of sustainable development. Greater availability of quality information and data and the involvement of communities in its creation will provide a fuller, more transparent allocation of resources."
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    "In this context, a right to information would be transformational. Access to information supports development by empowering people, especially marginalised people and those living in poverty, to: - Exercise their civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights. - Be economically active, productive and innovative. - Learn and apply new skills. - Enrich cultural identity and expression. - Take part in decision-making and participate in an active and engaged civil society. - Create community-based solutions to development challenges. - Ensure accountability, transparency, good governance, participation and empowerment. - Measure progress on public and private commitments on sustainable development. "
leonardoescalera

Right to be forgotten and Copyright - 10 views

Es indispensable el reconocimiento al derecho de olvido, pese a politicas de privacidad

open access publishing privacy module3 module4

c maggard

MOOCs -- Completion Is Not Important - 20 views

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    By: Matthew LeBar Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are often described as the future of education - or at least a significant part of it. But there may be a significant problem with them: a very small proportion of students who start them actually finish. This poses a serious threat to their legitimacy.
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    Very interesting article. I was at an Open Access week event recently that was a debate on the place of MOOCs in higher education. One point that another attendee raised about the completion rate of MOOCs that seemed really important to me was that many MOOCs require participants to register before viewing the content, and this can impact completion rate numbers. A person may only have the requisite information about whether or not the wish to participate once they have registered for the MOOC.
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    Thanks for sharing this! :) I am taking MOOC course about MOOC right now. I feel like completion could be a challenge for anyone who took it. I actually agree that completion is not everything in education. Since learning is more about understanding rather than completing, I think there is no point if someone did complete his/her MOOC but he/she does not understand about what he/she learned. However, I believe, in order to fully understand the course, it is better to complete what you have started.
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    I too feel that completion of MOOC is important. Other wise no point in participating in that MOOC. we also will get any information on the internet for knowledge gain. But there will be a regular follow up of the course for completing any MOOC. But only problem is having proper IT infrastructure to participate in that.
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    Thank you for sharing. On the one hand one can choose form the course lessons and material that they want and choose not to complete the whole course. Then of course one can not evaluate the course judging from the completion rate. On the other hand, ability to complete what is started develops human will-power and purposefulness. Otherwise the world is full of people with unfinished educations, short-term employments etc.
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    What the article says really is "MOOC completion rate is not a meaningful metrics about the course." Universities and institutions may need to have other metrics in order to evaluate whether to continue offer certain courses. As for individual participants, each person is her/his best critic on how much has been gained from the course.
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    Cierto, tal vez muchos no lo terminen. Yo creo que lo importante es el conocimiento aprendido.
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    Thanks for sharing this article. I'm in agreement with LeBar, completion of the MOOC is not the correct metric to be used for evaluation. The goal of many participants is to gain or increase knowledge on a topic which may be achieved without completing the whole course.
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    This ongoing MOOC is hard for me to complete since there is a lot of internet and network action required which I don't like to use at the moment. Still, I got so much Information that I will try to fulfill the requirements to pass it. It is not for the statistics - but for my personal support of the MOOC instructors (I wounder whether they notice)
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    i think MOOC will be more effective for exchange of knowledge e for certain important topic for stakeholder who aim self progress development
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    I have joined another MOOC and received the "statement of accomplishment" and it was totally a big disappointment. The design and the language used reflect mentality is not related to what they are teaching online. It is underestimating people around the world time and efforts by issuing a statement is not well designed and meaningless. The question would be: does it worth it to finish any course online? the knowledge is already free and affordable all over the net, why do I need to follow an institute organized free course? People are not finishing the MOOC courses because of frustration and disappointment and this has to be reviewed.
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    Tal vez no puede decirse que sea el futuro de la educación, pero si coadyuva para que el conocimiento pueda acercarse a cualquier persona, e incentivar al autoaprendizaje.
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    Habría que preguntarse cuál es el problema de que los estudiantes no concluyan los cursos MOOC, buscar las alternativas respectivas.MOOC ventanas de oportunidad para cualquier persona.
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    This brings up the question of what it means to complete something? And why is it so important to us? And why 'productivity', a thing somebody defined ages ago, is so important to our humanity? .. or is it anymore?
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    Because I am taking a MOOC course but also on campus at University, I receive credits and grades where this is definitely one of the motivations for me to contribute. Although I agree that completion of the course is not essential to attain knowledge, what about our motivations to learn? And what about our incentives? Not saying MOOCs are not interesting nor helpful, I like MOOCs, but I think people like recognition too. I think to just receive the "statement of accomplishment" is not enough to prove efforts made within the course. However MOOCs are not as well developed at this stage, there definitely will be adjustments in the near future.
Kevin Stranack

Terms of Service; Didn't Read - 4 views

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    An online review and ratings of the Terms of Service from different social media sites, including Facebook, Twitter, and more. "Terms of service are often too long to read, but it's important to understand what's in them. Your rights online depend on them. We hope that our ratings can help you get informed about your rights. "
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    I think people really need this online review because most of people do not have patience to read the long list of Terms of service but it does not mean they do not care about their rights online. This tool is great, I would like to use it and share to all of my friends. Hope more people could know that such a great tool exists.
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    This snapshot of terms of service for the various social media sites is excellent. Bookmarked!
ilanab

Research4Life - A short overview - 1 views

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    This is a brief synopsis covering the main aspects of Research4Life, including information about the creators and stakeholders, criteria for access, its composition and training given. In 2001 Research4Life was initially started by WHO with HINARI (Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative) to enable developing countries to access free or greatly subsidized biomedical and health literature. From 2003-09 this type of access to the AGORA, OARE and ARDI databases of scientific journals and books became available to over 77 poorer developing countries by Cornell and Yale Universities, FAO, UNEP and WIPO with other publishers. Institutions are required to meet specific criteria and categories to be entitled to the right to use of Research4Life resources. A few case studies are described which clearly show the impact Research4Life has had so far. We are informed of the future plans for the project too. This article gives a clear insight into how first world organisations are giving researchers and the populace of less developed countries the opportunity to advance their own research and development by providing access to current information and data.
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    As a librarian, research4life boosts my morale. Truly, librarians can be the unsung heroes in scientific researches. Librarians happily serve researchers without expecting anything but ensuring that they get the information they need. Research4life values the role of the librarians in the field of research and I appreciate that. I wish to express my gratitude to resesarch4life organization for giving value to the contribution of librarians in research
Kevin Stranack

Controlling Knowledge: Freedom of Information and Privacy Protection in a Networked World - 0 views

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    "Intended to serve as a "citizen's guide," Controlling Knowledge is a vital resource for anyone seeking to understand how freedom of information and privacy protection are legally defined and how this legislation is shaping our individual rights as citizens of the information age."
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    module1 privacy knowledge "public policy" "digital citizenship" ebook
c maggard

State of the Web: Reddit, the world's best anonymous social network - 1 views

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    Interesting reading in this Module, esp the article about having an additional anonymous online persona. It's interesting in that reddit not only allows users to register using obviously fake names, but also declines to require any authentication, but still offers it as an option. I participated in the reddit community for about a year, and in that time connected with numerous individuals, most of which I never learned 'who' they were. Personally, I was never harassed, bullied or otherwise hassled, save for one or two PMs from various mods when I had run afoul of their guidelines.
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    You beat me to it, i was planning on posting about reddit! Yeah, it's anonymous, and it's against its rules to post personal information, but it gets leaked and some people managed to get someone's information by reading old posts and connecting dots. The information you post, as a whole, its your footprint and can be tracked.
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    You beat me to it too! Reddit is a fascinating experiment. I actually mod a couple subreddits over there, and it's always interesting to read articles about it. In my two or so years on Reddit, I have: --Made friends (and lost touch with) with people from all over the world. --Been cyber-bullied and therefore witnessed exactly how good the moderators of certain subreddits can be. It was taken care of quickly and cleanly. I still love the community. --Seen people get "doxxed" (where their anonymity is broken, and often angry users track down the victim in a rather frightening way). --Seen the outrage the general community expresses at "doxxing", which was heartening. --Seen it used as an amazingly effective social networking and marketing tool. Posts and posters that come across and genuine, informed, and amicable are usually welcomed with open arms, even if they deal with a subject or product Redditors dislike. --Seen it completely backfire as a social networking and marketing tool, which happens when someone uses marketing "tricks" or comes across as anything less than genuine. --Gotten death threats for posting a picture of a squashed coin that made the front page. Reddit can be very weird. --Gotten beautiful, kind, completely random private messages for no reason at all on days where I really need them. Reddit can be very sweet. --Read articles in the Washington Post comparing Reddit to a democratic fiefdom. Sounds about right. --Been exposed to points of view I never would have seen before in my life, simply because of where I live and who I know. It's mind-blowing. The whole website just never ceases to amaze me. Honestly, it sort of reminds me of a MOOC: it's an ever-continuing event where people learn and argue and network.
siyuwang

Evaluation on the resource I shared: Can a mutually beneficial relationship exist betwe... - 0 views

This post discusses some of the tensions that exist between the increasing effort to enforce Intellectual Property Rights and the impact of the Internet. It introduces Intellectual Property (IP) an...

started by siyuwang on 04 Dec 14 no follow-up yet
luispain

The Internet's Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz : Brian Knappenberger : Free Download... - 7 views

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    The story of Aaron Swartz, incredible programmer and activist for internet rights, open access and open knowledge. Good documentary to learn a little more about the open access movement, see some important figures (Tim Berners-Lee, Lawrence Lessig, etc.) and the fight against the SOPA bill. A big part of the movie is about his personal life and legal battle over copyright infringement. Creative Commons license: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)
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    I saw it a couple of weeks ago. It is a heart-rending story, very well put together. The issues it raises are very serious, and the cost of losing such a brilliant young genius to the world is immeasurable. It is a wake up call of magnitude. Thanks for posting this link.
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    It's such an informative and well-made documentary. After watching it I was so excited to know more about Open Access, which is one of the reasons I attend this online course. Thanks for sharing.
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    Wow, this documentary can really have an effect, it's heartwarming to hear that the topic of this documentary is one of the reason you took this course! At the end of the movie I was half angry at the unjust prosecution of Swartz and the injustices on the access to knowledge and half uplifted, motivated to get more active on OA, OK and internet rights.
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    Although my interest was sparked by great open source projects, like R and PLOS, this documentary was a great inspiration a few weeks ago to relight that flame and join this course. Great to see how Aaron Schwartz still continues to be of inspiration to the open source community. Now and then I also love to go back reading stuff from his blog, e.g. his view on how to be productive (http://www.aaronsw.com/weblog/productivity)
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    I've been meaning to watch this for ages, thank you for bringing it to my attention again.
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    Gonna drop the academic personna for a sec and say it just makes me so mad and so sad what happened to him.
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    This was a great video! I enjoyed it very much and it was very touching. thank you for posting. @smoens - awesome blog too. thank you for the link.
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    For the Copyright section I recommend to watch this documentary: The Internet's Own Boy depicts the life of American computer programmer, writer, political organizer and Internet activist Aaron Swartz. It features interviews with his family and friends as well as the internet luminaries who worked with him.
jurado-navas

Welcome to Open Library (Open Library) - 24 views

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    Open Library is an open project: the software is open, the data are open, the documentation is open. Whether you fix a typo, add a book, or write a widget--it's all welcome. Open Library is a project of the non-profit Internet Archive, and has been funded in part by a grant from the California State Library and the Kahle/Austin Foundation.
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    Un esfuerzo encomiable, para plantarle cara a Google, cosa que soepecho que todos sabemos, no es asunto fácil. Robert Darnton, uno de los prmotores del proyecto, publicó varios textos que ubican el contexto general del proyecto. Uno esA World Digital Library Is Coming True!, en http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2014/may/22/world-digital-library-coming-true/, donde concluye: "It would be naive, however, to imagine a future free from the vested interests that have blocked the flow of information in the past. The lobbies at work in Washington also operate in Brussels, and a newly elected European Parliament will soon have to deal with the same issues that remain to be resolved in the US Congress. Commercialization and democratization operate on a global scale, and a great deal of access must be opened before the World Wide Web can accommodate a worldwide library."
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    This is awesome. Thanks for sharing it.
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    Really liked. Thanks for sharing it!
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    This website is an open source of information on a book resources. This is great, easy to download thru pdfiles. As technology spreads all throughout the world, the way we communicate to others and also the way we find an information has changed just like e-books or e-learning process.
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    i love open library, although the digitized books often have issues, the pdf formats are not great. many entries are not so great either. However, the important part of Openlibrary that no one has mentioned yet, is the lending model for digitized modern books. they have digitized books that are still in copyright, but do not have ebook editions and are usually not being reprinted. they lend one digital copy for one physical copy held in storage. they idea is to use the traditional rights of buyers provide under copyright rather than the contract law licensing of most ebooks.
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    Very good and will be helpful to all
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    Welcome to Open Library! Looking for accessible books in the DAISY format? View our accessible book subject page, or search for accessible books.
kristykim

Protecting Your Digital Identity - 4 views

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    I have many identities through many social media. When I post things online I wonder if I am being responsible of what I am posting. Even though I pick the people who are allowed to see my post, sometimes I wonder if people I do not know visit my profile. It is great to connect with people around the world. However, we have to take caution of what we post and whom we connect with. We need to protect our digital identities and be careful of hackers. If we are not careful, we can have our identity stolen.
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    Yes, it is our responsibility not to leave any personal information on internet instead of blaming fraudsters.If we use the technology gadgets appropriately it benefits us a lot else many problems too.
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    I totally agree! I think protecting our digital identities is really important. I personally is a multi-social media user, I used Pinterest, Facebook, Weibo, Instagram etc. and I also write blog sometime. However i realize that for some of the social media digital platform is not allow you to delete everything all at once, and sometime if you want to make your blog post private after you have published it, but the system wouldn't let you do that. Also so many social media platform are actually tracking your location by suing the gps ect. Right now I really feel like need to be aware when using social media and be aware when you are trying to post something online.
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    Thanks for the reminder once again to be wary of what and where we post online and the implications behind posting or leaving our digital identities online. I often forget that my information can easily be tracked, seen, manipulated, stolen by others when I participate in online activities such as social media sites, online shopping, and/or any other applications that requires submitting personal information.
Teresa Belkow

Pedestrian Lawyer - Know Your Rights - 2 views

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    Have you ever been in a similar situation? It´s important to know your rights on the street as well as on the internet, does anyone know a good resource for reading about what our rights are on the internet? Besides that, does the internet give us more freedom or does it take it away by monitoring us and making our personal profiles into data? I think that was the transcending question and dilemma which the first module presented, so do we accept the internet as an oxymoron, if not what is happening in the world inregards to being able to opt out from being monitored and used as a statistic and still enjoy the benefits of internet.
rogergsweden

From medieval education to 100,000 students in the classroom - 5 views

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    How an open course can work. "We don't want the students to remember the formulas. We want to change the way they look at the world."
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    Very nice, this is seriously exciting. good post....
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    Interesting for several reasons: A MOOC with due dates, and yet only 15% get a certificate of accomplishment. Nearly half of the students watched less than a video a week, that is less than 60 minutes in ten week. Any class with this kind of record would be considered a failure in a traditional setting. Yet it seems, the "teachers" were more interested in the data they gathered on student interaction than on the success of their students. But it is good that you can glean this kind of information from the video - therefore: Good post.
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    I found this video really interesting. The attempt to emulate a one-on-one learning interaction through the structure of the videos was an interesting, emotionally engaging, concept. The actual completion rate of the particular MOOC discussed wasn't very high, but it would be interesting to look at it in the context of other similar MOOCs. Even though this video was interesting it went the way that many TED talks go. Very emotionally engaging, but left me with lots of questions and wanting more.
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    Awesome! Interesting and informative.
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    I liked how Ted explains the way students access to Open Courses and how right he is when he says that if there are no due dates, even if the topic is very interesting, there are always other things to do first, therefore, you end up not doing it. I am also with him in not doing moocs to long that can get you bored and end up losing all your attention.
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    very informative!
natashasana

Who Owns Your Data? - 0 views

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    Who owns the Data or the question should be, who is manipulating the Data? The article by Alistair Croll on who owns the Data asks big questions but fails short to highlight the fact that there is someone out there manipulating the well intended, innocent data into their own profit motive agendas. Many times, I have received emails, phone calls and SMS from sales people trying to sell me something. How they got my contact details is definitely my guess that someone is busy manipulating the data, I gave away for profit motives. At the end of the article the writer makes an opinion that, we are using the internet for free? Which I disagree, because our data makes and runs the internet. Without our data, the internet will not be the internet. Without our data on Facebook, facebooks or twitter will be blank, no value and worthless. If companies are paying people to participate in surveys and opinions, then it means our free data we upload on the internet, facebook and twitter is a payment for us to use the internet. After all we have to pay to the internet service providers for us to access to use the internet, and face book. Or someone is even suppose to pay for our data, in fact we have made things easy for the marketing people who now just sit behind their laptops and manipulate our free given data for their own consumptions. Or maybe I should console myself that, since the article is old, maybe someone has answered my question?
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    A mi me pareció que el artículo señala dos puntos centrales, aunque resolver el tema es una empresa peliaguda. El asunto de lo gratuito en un sistema basado en la ganancia y la capacidad de aprovechar los resquicios que abren las situaciones nuevas y una buena dosis de desorientación generalizada: 1. As we use the Internet for "free," we have to remember that if we're not paying for something, we're not the customer. We are in fact the product being sold - or, more specifically, our data is. 2. The important question isn't who owns the data. Ultimately, we all do. A better question is, who owns the means of analysis? Because that's how, as Brand suggests, you get the right information in the right place. The digital divide isn't about who owns data - it's about who can put that data to work. Tal vez, como menciona natashasana, el problema sea más complejo, y reducir la manipulación al negocio deje temas relavantes fuera. Y la información que usan/manipulan es la que todos aportamos. Cierto, pero no todos la usamos o aprovechamos de la misma forma.
robert morris

Canadian privacy laws - 3 views

Brazil has Marco Civil - internet and digital privacy laws. New Zealand, nothing.

module1 privacy

kvdmerwe

Communication as a form of learning - 2 views

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    Libraries have long been a source of mostly free information for many people dating back to the Library of Alexandria. Early libraries used scrolls, but Tod Colgrove suggests that more learning may have taken place via person to person learning in those spaces, then from the scrolls themselves. 2000 years later, although we have vastly upgraded the technology and have an abundance of information at our fingertips, right now we are still learning from each other by taking part in this MOOC and sharing our information and knowledge so that we can learn from each other. Another important point Colgrove makes is that as long as librarians can come up with cutting edge ways to share knowledge, there will be a place for libraries in our schools and public places.
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    Libraries have a role to play in our lives and the libraries of the past did the same on our ancestors. They continue to undergo metamorphosis in response to the demands of the future. Viva the spirit and the resilience of libraries!
tlsohn

When Is it One Gadget Too Many? - 4 views

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    Do you own too many devices? Posted: How many tech gadgets do you own? Chances are, you have a PC, Mac or Windows, desktop or laptop and a smartphone. Maybe you both kinds of PCs, a desktop workstation and a portable laptop. Maybe you have a tablet -- large or small? You might also have a Kindle e-reader.
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    If I had to pick just one gadget to keep and turf all the rest, I'd pick my iphone. I'd move all the files on my desktop/laptop into the cloud and use my iphone as the means to connect to everything. A project I'd like to undertake in the future is to do a complete MOOC on my phone. Right now I migrate between an ipad, laptop and my iphone but I think I could do it all on the phone. It would be frustrating but doable.
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    I find myself constantly needing more devices, even though I know one is enough. We do live in this gadget-centric world, and with every year that Apple introduces something that blows away their last invention, I feel the need to acquire it. Though, what's actually stopped me from acquiring anything, is that I know year after year, there will be another 'revolutionary product' that will 'enhance' my life. So for now, it's just a laptop and a phone! Though a tablet does sound tempting...
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    In my household we have two adults, two children, one Mac desktop, two smartphones, a nexus and an iPad. It seems to work out that we have enough for my husband to be learning and practicing coding on the mac, my son learning Italian on an app, my daughter watching animal videos all while I'm looking up a recipe online. So far so good. I wouldn't add any to it. And sometimes I want to subtract, but we're in a new era and I'm done fighting it. I'm trying to embrace all the wonderful qualities the device era has to offer.
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