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Olivia Azar

$ of technological change - 0 views

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    Great insight on the costs in the long run of technological change.
w_kwai

Google iPhone tracking: more than 70 users contact lawyers - 1 views

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    More than 70 Apple iPhone users in the UK have joined a landmark privacy action against Google over the way it tracked their online habits, and another 30 have expressed interest, lawyers said on Tuesday.
w_kwai

Europe's next privacy war is with websites silently tracking users - 2 views

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    The pan-European data regulator group Article 29 has issued new opinion on how websites and advertisers can track users and the permissions they require. The new opinion dictates that "device fingerprinting" - a process of silently collecting information about a user - requires the same level of consent as cookies that are used to track users across the internet.
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    It is impossible to ban all tracking, just like if I am using Chrome, it is normal for me to think that I am tracked by Google. If I am using Safari, then it is normal for me to think I am tracked by Safari. I believe that there is not anything wrong with people collecting my "non-identifying material", since it is only data. But if it is more like personal information, it should be banned. Also, there are a lot of sites when we ban cookies, the photos or some content will not appear. So no cookies means no content. In the end would not there be no effect on how people uses the websites? If we do not accept it, we could not use the site, the only difference is we are informed about it, and we should assume every site or software once it is connected to the internet, it implies some kind of tracking.
w_kwai

Privacy advocates unmask Twitter troll - 1 views

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    What happens when you troll Tor developers hard? You get unmasked. Towards the end of last week, a troll who had sent various aggressive tweets to a host of security experts and privacy advocates associated with the Tor project and browser, which enables online anonymity, had his identity exposed.
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    It is important to stand up against all kinds of bullying, in this case it is cyberbullying. But what is the difference when it comes to someone bullies you, and you bully that person back? It is still bullying. Although I think some actions should be taken to tackle the people trolling, it is difficult because of the massive amount of people who are leaving angry or horrible responses. To monitor every netizens activity is impossible and inefficient, it also violates privacy rights (even when we know we are monitored at some point). What do you think about creating filters? I think that will restrict the freedom of speech people have. So is having freedom and open access such a brilliant thing? Would it not cause moral conflicts? Education and moral standards would not always relate, because emotions is one of the measures too.
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    Thanks for your sharing. A lot of people have been the victim of cyberbullying, the reason of cyberbullying has become increasingly common might has some relationship with the advanced technology and also due to people can say whatever they want to say by hiding behind their digital identities, so they do not care about moral standard any more. And it's true that it's really hard to take action to everyone who involved in cyberbullying because the amount is huge.
liyanl

Is Facebook Making Us Lonely? - 1 views

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    I found this article interesting to me as it is some how relevant to digital identity and social media. This is an article from magazine The Atlantic that being published on May 2012, by Stephen Marche. At the beginning of the article Marche represents that over-reliance on social networking has turned people isolated by telling a true story about the Playboy Playmate Vickers's mummified body was found a year after she died and in the months before her death, she had not made any calls to her friends or family but kept in touch with the fans from internet sites. Along with the article, Marche represents that social media such as Facebook have made people networked easier than ever, but at the same time it is also making more and more people lonely. Also, Marche has exemplified a social condition, anomie, which is described as a lack of social norms characterized by breakdown of social bonds. Thus this article has provided relevant resource about anomie which has become part of deterioration to interpersonal relationship with social networking.
kristykim

Facebook Scams, Hoaxes, and Malware - 0 views

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    The social networking site Facebook is large enough to have attracted more than its share of scams, hoaxes, and malware. The same cautions should apply when using Facebook as when reading regular e-mail or outside web sites: Don't believe everything you read.
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    You are assuming that Facebook is more reliable that hackers and hoaxes, you have to think again. We are already exposed more than you imagine and we can not do anything about it. Your personal data is uploaded and even if you want to stop and delete your self from the net it will remain.
kristykim

How companies collect your private information when you browse online - 1 views

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    When we are browsing online, we do not think about electronic privacy and the personal information our computer leaves. Some may be aware of this, but some are not. Companies and other electronic sites are collecting our private information when we are browsing online. They keep track on the things we buy and things we may search. We need to protect our Internet privacy while surfing the Web and monitor the information our computer sends out. Another option you can do is to control your personal information online and offline. Although IP addresses can provide a fairly detailed summary of our computer, Web browser cookies provide a more complete profile of a user's preferences. Three types of cookies are sent out when we surf the Internet. The three types of cookies are session cookie, persistent cookie, and third-party ad-serving cookie. For more information check out this site.
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    I had heard about it through a computer specialist a few years back. Since then, we try to be more careful but I think that if someone wants information from you the wil get it anyway.
kristykim

10 New Breakthrough Technologies 2014 | MIT Technology Review - 1 views

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    Check out the 10 new breakthrough technologies 2014 on MIT technology review
Alexandra Finch

Internet Addiction: A new Clinical Phenomenon and Its Consequences - 0 views

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    Young, K. (2004). Internet Addiction: A new Clinical Phenomenon and Its Consequences. American Behavioral Scientist. 48:402
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    a. Although this is a psychology article, it poses an important concern over the rise of internet addiction in connected populations. This article is relevant to this course, as it relates to the notion of critical consumption; some users are unable to filter information effectively, which should be recognized as a concern. Young states many statistics from educators and researchers discounting internet use in the classroom as it is far too distracting and the loss of productivity (in both students and the workforce) is immense.
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    Some might argue that this article shows the downside of connected learning and e-resources, however this is not the case.

    Certain web activities mentioned in the paper such as chat rooms, social media, and video games are not the focus of this course. Open Knowledge deals with the light side of the internet, which is the interconnectivity, the accelerated learning, and the ability to publish ones own content. The internet can definitely be misused, but not every web activity is "junk food". If someone obsessively became a mathematician and ultimately ended up being the best mathematician in the world due to "addiction" people would call him or her a genius. The trick is to filter which content and activities one engages in.
susan2014

Teaching and learning using technology - 3 views

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    The book that I share with you is a treasure, is so extraordinary that in it we can find information about universities with high academic prestige just like Stanford University. It covers topics of great interest and dynamism like, augmented reality, game-based learning and global knowledge among others.
w_kwai

Stop Hating Online: "Consequences" TV Ad - 6 views

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    The Canadian Government promoting how sharing private content of someone is illegal. Having the internet and our social media tools, it is so easy to share and connect with people. It is great in many ways, like education, social life, work etc. but when it comes to personal life, maybe it is not as great. People like to share because it is easy and fast, there are no physical restrictions. There are consequences but because there are too many people doing it, it is hard to target everyone. With this digital age coming so quickly, maybe rules, regulations, and education are still trying to catch up. If I have not taken this course, I would not have known that sharing a screenshot on Whatsapp with friends is actually illegal. The point is when everyone is doing it now, and we were not deeply educated on this topic beforehand, how is this going to stop? When sharing screenshots has became a trend, how is it possible to stop?
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    I think this video does an excellent job of not victim-blaming, or casting any moral judgement. I think it's easy to say "don't take pictures", etc., but approaching it as a strictly legal matter may be a better route to take.
    Speaking of the general open access movement, I think some valuable lessons could be taken from this for raising awareness about appropriate uses of open access information. It reminds me of the Disney compilation copyright video we watched at the beginning of the course - using some very literal imagery to get a point across, and explaining what the law is, not what people are doing with it.
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    I think this PSA does a really good job of communicating a 'touchy' subject in a tasteful manner. The message is simple and very relatable for adolescents. Cyberbullying is a tremendous issue among youth in Canada and I am really glad to see the government taking preventative initiatives.
w_kwai

Harvard University admits to secretly photographing students - 11 views

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    I think, its really an expensive and unnecessary experiments, if the attendance of Harvard University is low, then they have to come up with different rule to attract the interest of students. Cameras should be there for security, but not for surveillance.
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    Similar example to what Adobe software has done with collecting information…users/students seem to have to accept this "new-normal" of spying, etc.
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    I agree. Cameras should be there for security, not for surveillance. But just like the Adobe software, before we use it we have to "agree" on its' terms. I believe very few actually read those agreements, because we have to use the software, "agreeing" on those terms might just be "agreeing" on allowing them to collect our information.
    I live in Vancouver, BC. I know there are people who dislike the idea of the buses with cameras. I personally like that idea, it makes me feel like I am protected. When I was in high school in Victoria, BC, I feel safe taking the taxi even when it is late, because they have cameras in every one of them. When I was in Hong Kong, I feel insecure taking a taxi even when it is noon. So even if some of our information or our identity is given away, I agree on the idea of having cameras on buses and taxi's. I wonder if there is a gender difference on this, and there is also a gender gap of taxi drivers, maybe that is also why I personally feel insecure. Back to the point, if the purpose of cameras is for security, I agree to that. If it is for surveillance, I do not think it is essential; referring to the Harvard University attendance, at least they should inform the students about it.
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    This line caught my eye: "The study was approved by the US federally mandated Institutional Review Board, which assesses research and determined that the study "did not constitute human subjects research" and therefore did not require prior permission from those captured by the study." I have been debating with my own campus IRB over what constitutes human subjects research and what doesn't--they seem to be operating under the idea that if it's not invasive medical studies involving blood or drugs, it's not really human subjects. I think the issue in this Harvard study is that the IRB also has a clause that if you are collecting data in public spaces and not interacting with the people there, it doesn't require IRB approval; the question is whether these classrooms should be considered public spaces. My feeling is they aren't--in order to be in a room at a particular time, a person has to have chosen to attend that class, and within college classes it is assumed that the students can know that what they say is to some extent private among their classmates and professor. Even if the photos were destroyed after analysis, the fact remains that there were cameras inside what I would consider private spaces, without the consent of the people doing what they might feel is dangerous work (given the current assault on public intellectuals and academic freedom). My guess is that Harvard could easily have asked all the relevant parties to sign consent forms at the beginning of a semester but not indicated on which days they would be filming--people would probably continue doing what they normally do either way, but at least would have the option of asking not to be filmed. There's always a way to set up an area in a lecture hall where the cameras couldn't reach, so students who didn't want to be on film could opt out.
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    Thank you so much for sharing this article, I meant to read it a few days ago and got side-tracked!
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    Thanks for sharing this! I have mixed feelings about this article. At first, I was super opposed to the whole initiative Harvard did to their students because I would feel that my privacy has been violated completely, but after realizing that there are many more subtler forms of violations in privacy online (social media sites, tracking cookies etc.) I wasn't as opposed to the article. Although initially, students were not informed about their surveillance, there were told in the aftermath, and their information was destroyed. When using social media sites or installing new applications, there are terms of agreement before continuing on with the installation in which personally I don't read at all. Those terms and conditions have statements inside which notify us of tracking personal information which I have not read earlier but am still not opposed to giving. The information is probably sold to advertisers and we're probably not aware of it but we still give them the information via the signup of the program. Hence, even though there are contradictory views and feelings about their initiatives, we should be more aware and cautious of other forms of surveillance when we sign up for things (e.g. social media sites etc.)
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    Thank you for sharing. This does raise some concern. I guess there may be good and bad with cameras installed in the school. The cameras installed without students' consents may be violating their privacy and rights. However, it may prevent wrong doings, i guess. When my friend was doing final exam, the prof asked the whole class to put their belongings in front of the classroom, but when he went to pick up his stuff after he was finished, his bag was missing. Through the security camera, they were able to see who stole his stuff.
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    Did any body else remember George Orwell's novel (1984). By accepting this type of behavior we accepting the image of a holly power that is ethical, care and neutral. Does this exist? and who will monitor the observers?
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    I think this is a really good point, who will monitor the observers? What kind of power do those people hold and what are they doing with all those information? It makes people uncomfortable.
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    Interesting news! It's surprising to get to know that Harvard University places cameras without letting students know, photographs them during lectures to measure attendance. This reminds me of my high school in China. When I was in high school, I remember that cameras were installed at the back of every classroom to prevent students from distraction in class or cheating during exams. It mainly worked as threatening students, from my understanding. Because you never know when the camera will be opened, actually, it never opened. What happened in Harvard University just reminded me of that, which is quite satiric.
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    Thanks for sharing this article. In my personal opinion, I think the action of secretly installed the cameras from Harvard University violates students' privacy. If it's just for measuring classroom attendance, I think Harvard University could definitely find a much better way instead of installing the camera.
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    wondering if this would be a different conversation if the cameras were just picking up heat signals so that the identity of the people could not be known but they could still be counted. The technology is pretty basic and it might even be more efficient than the way they're using them now.
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    Can't believe Harvard can do this thing. I think informations are sharing and revealing on internet or others more and more serious. Harvard shouldn't secretly photograph students, they should ask permission first.
yitingwang

What Is Your Digital Identity - 1 views

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    The Website helps people to define their digital identities and then control their identities. I think it is useful and necessary. People always post something online and then don't know what the effect is. All these information online becomes their identities. However, the information may hurt them in the future if someone bad exposes them in a different way and in a different situation. Many singers and artists suffer from this kind of thing. So, i think it is useful to tell people how they can create a appropriate digital identity.
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    Every time we send emails, post on social media or simply surf the web we are leaving behind digital DNA. The binary tattoo is a really effective way to manage our social media footprint!
kristykim

Influence of Online Social Networks on our Youth - 7 views

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    It is great that people are connecting with each other; however, we need to think about the influence of online social network on our Youth.
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    Yes, Social media has both positive and negative results. We need to watch our children how are they using it. We can explain them how to benefit from social media without disturbing our identity and image. We can also explain them use as much as required only not to sit with that hours together. Children completely now on internet and not having outdoor games now a days. There is a requirement of awareness program to them.
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    Social media is both an asset and liability…great for connecting with others but too much information can lead to issues between peers…some fresh air away from a device might do better!
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    I think this is a valid concern, high schools around the country are permitting cell phone use in classrooms which is opening the doors to more group chat during and after class about everything but academics.
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    In a world dominated by technology there is no denying the significant influence of social media on our Youth. That being said, I think there is a critical demand for social media education in the classroom. I would love to see a stronger emphasis placed on employing technology as an instrument of education in the school system. Social media should be taught as a tool for research, collaboration and activism rather than a trivial pastime.
kristykim

Protecting Your Digital Identity - 4 views

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    I have many identities through many social media. When I post things online I wonder if I am being responsible of what I am posting. Even though I pick the people who are allowed to see my post, sometimes I wonder if people I do not know visit my profile. It is great to connect with people around the world. However, we have to take caution of what we post and whom we connect with. We need to protect our digital identities and be careful of hackers. If we are not careful, we can have our identity stolen.
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    Yes, it is our responsibility not to leave any personal information on internet instead of blaming fraudsters.If we use the technology gadgets appropriately it benefits us a lot else many problems too.
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    I totally agree! I think protecting our digital identities is really important. I personally is a multi-social media user, I used Pinterest, Facebook, Weibo, Instagram etc. and I also write blog sometime. However i realize that for some of the social media digital platform is not allow you to delete everything all at once, and sometime if you want to make your blog post private after you have published it, but the system wouldn't let you do that. Also so many social media platform are actually tracking your location by suing the gps ect. Right now I really feel like need to be aware when using social media and be aware when you are trying to post something online.
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    Thanks for the reminder once again to be wary of what and where we post online and the implications behind posting or leaving our digital identities online. I often forget that my information can easily be tracked, seen, manipulated, stolen by others when I participate in online activities such as social media sites, online shopping, and/or any other applications that requires submitting personal information.
azhar_ka

The Social Media Effect: Are You Really Who You Portray Online? - 0 views

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    Posted: Over the past 15 years, the world as we know it has been taken by storm through the onset of social media. According to Comscore (2011) about 90 percent of U.S. Internet users visit a social media site each month.
Abdul Naser Tamim

Modern Discussion - 0 views

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    Site to exchange opinion and ideas dealing with left and civil society and to implement the participatory culture at the political level.
shirley

Apps for Librarians: digital literacy with mobile apps - 0 views

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    It is said that "the move to mobile is empowering for all types of users, from toddlers to the elderly. It's also great for people with various types of disabilities - which could be anyone at different times in their lives."
alibabas

Technological change, connected learning - 1 views

A newly discovered resources i found with reference to : technological change connected learning The web Link is : dmlhub.net/sites/default/files/ConnectedLearning_report.pdf

Technological change connected learning Knowledge Open Module2 Module 2 open access MOOC

started by alibabas on 31 Oct 14 no follow-up yet
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