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w_kwai

Google iPhone tracking: more than 70 users contact lawyers - 1 views

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    More than 70 Apple iPhone users in the UK have joined a landmark privacy action against Google over the way it tracked their online habits, and another 30 have expressed interest, lawyers said on Tuesday.
w_kwai

Europe's next privacy war is with websites silently tracking users - 2 views

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    The pan-European data regulator group Article 29 has issued new opinion on how websites and advertisers can track users and the permissions they require. The new opinion dictates that "device fingerprinting" - a process of silently collecting information about a user - requires the same level of consent as cookies that are used to track users across the internet.
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    It is impossible to ban all tracking, just like if I am using Chrome, it is normal for me to think that I am tracked by Google. If I am using Safari, then it is normal for me to think I am tracked by Safari. I believe that there is not anything wrong with people collecting my "non-identifying material", since it is only data. But if it is more like personal information, it should be banned. Also, there are a lot of sites when we ban cookies, the photos or some content will not appear. So no cookies means no content. In the end would not there be no effect on how people uses the websites? If we do not accept it, we could not use the site, the only difference is we are informed about it, and we should assume every site or software once it is connected to the internet, it implies some kind of tracking.
adesimine

Privacy in the Internet of Things Era - 0 views

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    Privacy concerns for when the interconnectedness of our world gets even tighter.
shirley

THE BEACONS FAQ: Everything You Need To Know About Beacons And Apple's iBeacon System - 3 views

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    Beacons are a new type of device that could change the way people shop in stores and revolutionize how retailers collect consumer data and interact with shoppers. Retailers can use beacons to trigger location-based features on customers' smartphone apps, including targeted coupons, store maps, and hands-free payments.
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    seems like there are some clear privacy issues here but I'm pretty conflicted on the use of these as it is advantageous for all parties when consumers allow businesses to target them more efficiently
nthabik

'Regin' spy software snooping for years - Symantec - 0 views

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    San Francisco - Computer security firm Symantec on Monday said it uncovered stealthy software wielded as part of a years-long spying campaign, most likely by a nation state. The malicious software, dubbed Regin, has a rare level of sophistication and has been targeting government agencies, telecoms, utilities, airlines, research facilities, private individuals and others since at least 2008, according to Symantec Corporation.
azhar_ka

Why privacy matters? - 1 views

shared by azhar_ka on 22 Nov 14 - No Cached
nthabik liked it
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    Es interesante el video, sin embargo después de revisar otros materiales, creo que el conocimiento debe ser compartido.
lenjomaydresden

Resources: new for me. - 1 views

While reading a lot in the different Groups recommended in this stanford MOOC i figured some new resources for me: as a teacher: Student-driven journals to introduce scientific Quality, quizstar to...

Privacy individual

started by lenjomaydresden on 21 Nov 14 no follow-up yet
w_kwai

Stop Hating Online: "Consequences" TV Ad - 6 views

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    The Canadian Government promoting how sharing private content of someone is illegal. Having the internet and our social media tools, it is so easy to share and connect with people. It is great in many ways, like education, social life, work etc. but when it comes to personal life, maybe it is not as great. People like to share because it is easy and fast, there are no physical restrictions. There are consequences but because there are too many people doing it, it is hard to target everyone. With this digital age coming so quickly, maybe rules, regulations, and education are still trying to catch up. If I have not taken this course, I would not have known that sharing a screenshot on Whatsapp with friends is actually illegal. The point is when everyone is doing it now, and we were not deeply educated on this topic beforehand, how is this going to stop? When sharing screenshots has became a trend, how is it possible to stop?
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    I think this video does an excellent job of not victim-blaming, or casting any moral judgement. I think it's easy to say "don't take pictures", etc., but approaching it as a strictly legal matter may be a better route to take.
    Speaking of the general open access movement, I think some valuable lessons could be taken from this for raising awareness about appropriate uses of open access information. It reminds me of the Disney compilation copyright video we watched at the beginning of the course - using some very literal imagery to get a point across, and explaining what the law is, not what people are doing with it.
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    I think this PSA does a really good job of communicating a 'touchy' subject in a tasteful manner. The message is simple and very relatable for adolescents. Cyberbullying is a tremendous issue among youth in Canada and I am really glad to see the government taking preventative initiatives.
azhar_ka

Online Privacy Canada: Youth Oversharing Financial Info, Visa Poll Finds - 2 views

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    Young people, such as myself, don't always realize the need for privacy as we grew up in an era dominated by the internet. I think it's important to educate people to be wary of releasing sensitive information (such as financial documents, as this article highlights) as negative consequences are likely to ensue.
azhar_ka

Murder on Snapchat - 2 views

shared by azhar_ka on 18 Nov 14 - No Cached
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    In a world where everything is recorded, stored and digitally captured forever it's hard to keep things private. Enter Snapchat, where everything that is meant to be lost is lost. But what happens when our lives turn into a ticking clock? What's done, is done.
w_kwai

Harvard University admits to secretly photographing students - 11 views

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    I think, its really an expensive and unnecessary experiments, if the attendance of Harvard University is low, then they have to come up with different rule to attract the interest of students. Cameras should be there for security, but not for surveillance.
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    Similar example to what Adobe software has done with collecting information…users/students seem to have to accept this "new-normal" of spying, etc.
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    I agree. Cameras should be there for security, not for surveillance. But just like the Adobe software, before we use it we have to "agree" on its' terms. I believe very few actually read those agreements, because we have to use the software, "agreeing" on those terms might just be "agreeing" on allowing them to collect our information.
    I live in Vancouver, BC. I know there are people who dislike the idea of the buses with cameras. I personally like that idea, it makes me feel like I am protected. When I was in high school in Victoria, BC, I feel safe taking the taxi even when it is late, because they have cameras in every one of them. When I was in Hong Kong, I feel insecure taking a taxi even when it is noon. So even if some of our information or our identity is given away, I agree on the idea of having cameras on buses and taxi's. I wonder if there is a gender difference on this, and there is also a gender gap of taxi drivers, maybe that is also why I personally feel insecure. Back to the point, if the purpose of cameras is for security, I agree to that. If it is for surveillance, I do not think it is essential; referring to the Harvard University attendance, at least they should inform the students about it.
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    This line caught my eye: "The study was approved by the US federally mandated Institutional Review Board, which assesses research and determined that the study "did not constitute human subjects research" and therefore did not require prior permission from those captured by the study." I have been debating with my own campus IRB over what constitutes human subjects research and what doesn't--they seem to be operating under the idea that if it's not invasive medical studies involving blood or drugs, it's not really human subjects. I think the issue in this Harvard study is that the IRB also has a clause that if you are collecting data in public spaces and not interacting with the people there, it doesn't require IRB approval; the question is whether these classrooms should be considered public spaces. My feeling is they aren't--in order to be in a room at a particular time, a person has to have chosen to attend that class, and within college classes it is assumed that the students can know that what they say is to some extent private among their classmates and professor. Even if the photos were destroyed after analysis, the fact remains that there were cameras inside what I would consider private spaces, without the consent of the people doing what they might feel is dangerous work (given the current assault on public intellectuals and academic freedom). My guess is that Harvard could easily have asked all the relevant parties to sign consent forms at the beginning of a semester but not indicated on which days they would be filming--people would probably continue doing what they normally do either way, but at least would have the option of asking not to be filmed. There's always a way to set up an area in a lecture hall where the cameras couldn't reach, so students who didn't want to be on film could opt out.
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    Thank you so much for sharing this article, I meant to read it a few days ago and got side-tracked!
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    Thanks for sharing this! I have mixed feelings about this article. At first, I was super opposed to the whole initiative Harvard did to their students because I would feel that my privacy has been violated completely, but after realizing that there are many more subtler forms of violations in privacy online (social media sites, tracking cookies etc.) I wasn't as opposed to the article. Although initially, students were not informed about their surveillance, there were told in the aftermath, and their information was destroyed. When using social media sites or installing new applications, there are terms of agreement before continuing on with the installation in which personally I don't read at all. Those terms and conditions have statements inside which notify us of tracking personal information which I have not read earlier but am still not opposed to giving. The information is probably sold to advertisers and we're probably not aware of it but we still give them the information via the signup of the program. Hence, even though there are contradictory views and feelings about their initiatives, we should be more aware and cautious of other forms of surveillance when we sign up for things (e.g. social media sites etc.)
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    Thank you for sharing. This does raise some concern. I guess there may be good and bad with cameras installed in the school. The cameras installed without students' consents may be violating their privacy and rights. However, it may prevent wrong doings, i guess. When my friend was doing final exam, the prof asked the whole class to put their belongings in front of the classroom, but when he went to pick up his stuff after he was finished, his bag was missing. Through the security camera, they were able to see who stole his stuff.
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    Did any body else remember George Orwell's novel (1984). By accepting this type of behavior we accepting the image of a holly power that is ethical, care and neutral. Does this exist? and who will monitor the observers?
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    I think this is a really good point, who will monitor the observers? What kind of power do those people hold and what are they doing with all those information? It makes people uncomfortable.
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    Interesting news! It's surprising to get to know that Harvard University places cameras without letting students know, photographs them during lectures to measure attendance. This reminds me of my high school in China. When I was in high school, I remember that cameras were installed at the back of every classroom to prevent students from distraction in class or cheating during exams. It mainly worked as threatening students, from my understanding. Because you never know when the camera will be opened, actually, it never opened. What happened in Harvard University just reminded me of that, which is quite satiric.
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    Thanks for sharing this article. In my personal opinion, I think the action of secretly installed the cameras from Harvard University violates students' privacy. If it's just for measuring classroom attendance, I think Harvard University could definitely find a much better way instead of installing the camera.
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    wondering if this would be a different conversation if the cameras were just picking up heat signals so that the identity of the people could not be known but they could still be counted. The technology is pretty basic and it might even be more efficient than the way they're using them now.
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    Can't believe Harvard can do this thing. I think informations are sharing and revealing on internet or others more and more serious. Harvard shouldn't secretly photograph students, they should ask permission first.
c maggard

Microsoft Open Sources .NET, Saying It Will Run On Linux and Mac | WIRED - 2 views

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    Satya Nadella's rapid reinvention of Microsoft continues. In yet another bid to make up lost ground in the long march to the future of computing, Microsoft is now open sourcing the very foundation of .NET-the software that millions of developers use to build and operate websites and other large online applications-and it says this free...


    Not much to add on this that won't outright plagiarize the author, but anyone who knows anything about software and operating systems knows this is huge. Open source software is traditionally more nimble and able to deal with various threats in a more timely fashion, whereas Microsoft has to get a team on it, perfect it, and roll out updates to million of customers who may not even know what to do with it once it hits their inbox. Anyone with a Linux machine at home can search, copy and paste the code to fix almost any problem they discover, and be back at work within minutes. The parallels to Open Knowledge are numerous.
c maggard

MOOCs -- Completion Is Not Important - 20 views

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    By: Matthew LeBar Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are often described as the future of education - or at least a significant part of it. But there may be a significant problem with them: a very small proportion of students who start them actually finish. This poses a serious threat to their legitimacy.
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    Very interesting article. I was at an Open Access week event recently that was a debate on the place of MOOCs in higher education. One point that another attendee raised about the completion rate of MOOCs that seemed really important to me was that many MOOCs require participants to register before viewing the content, and this can impact completion rate numbers. A person may only have the requisite information about whether or not the wish to participate once they have registered for the MOOC.
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    Thanks for sharing this! :) I am taking MOOC course about MOOC right now. I feel like completion could be a challenge for anyone who took it. I actually agree that completion is not everything in education. Since learning is more about understanding rather than completing, I think there is no point if someone did complete his/her MOOC but he/she does not understand about what he/she learned. However, I believe, in order to fully understand the course, it is better to complete what you have started.
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    I too feel that completion of MOOC is important. Other wise no point in participating in that MOOC. we also will get any information on the internet for knowledge gain. But there will be a regular follow up of the course for completing any MOOC. But only problem is having proper IT infrastructure to participate in that.
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    Thank you for sharing.
    On the one hand one can choose form the course lessons and material that they want and choose not to complete the whole course. Then of course one can not evaluate the course judging from the completion rate.
    On the other hand, ability to complete what is started develops human will-power and purposefulness. Otherwise the world is full of people with unfinished educations, short-term employments etc.
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    What the article says really is "MOOC completion rate is not a meaningful metrics about the course." Universities and institutions may need to have other metrics in order to evaluate whether to continue offer certain courses. As for individual participants, each person is her/his best critic on how much has been gained from the course.
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    Cierto, tal vez muchos no lo terminen. Yo creo que lo importante es el conocimiento aprendido.
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    Thanks for sharing this article. I'm in agreement with LeBar, completion of the MOOC is not the correct metric to be used for evaluation. The goal of many participants is to gain or increase knowledge on a topic which may be achieved without completing the whole course.
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    This ongoing MOOC is hard for me to complete since there is a lot of internet and network action required which I don't like to use at the moment. Still, I got so much Information that I will try to fulfill the requirements to pass it. It is not for the statistics - but for my personal support of the MOOC instructors (I wounder whether they notice)
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    i think MOOC will be more effective for exchange of knowledge e for certain important topic for stakeholder who aim self progress development
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    I have joined another MOOC and received the "statement of accomplishment" and it was totally a big disappointment. The design and the language used reflect mentality is not related to what they are teaching online. It is underestimating people around the world time and efforts by issuing a statement is not well designed and meaningless. The question would be: does it worth it to finish any course online? the knowledge is already free and affordable all over the net, why do I need to follow an institute organized free course?
    People are not finishing the MOOC courses because of frustration and disappointment and this has to be reviewed.
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    Tal vez no puede decirse que sea el futuro de la educación, pero si coadyuva para que el conocimiento pueda acercarse a cualquier persona, e incentivar al autoaprendizaje.
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    Habría que preguntarse cuál es el problema de que los estudiantes no concluyan los cursos MOOC, buscar las alternativas respectivas.MOOC ventanas de oportunidad para cualquier persona.
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    This brings up the question of what it means to complete something? And why is it so important to us? And why 'productivity', a thing somebody defined ages ago, is so important to our humanity? .. or is it anymore?
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    Because I am taking a MOOC course but also on campus at University, I receive credits and grades where this is definitely one of the motivations for me to contribute. Although I agree that completion of the course is not essential to attain knowledge, what about our motivations to learn? And what about our incentives? Not saying MOOCs are not interesting nor helpful, I like MOOCs, but I think people like recognition too. I think to just receive the "statement of accomplishment" is not enough to prove efforts made within the course. However MOOCs are not as well developed at this stage, there definitely will be adjustments in the near future.
monde3297

Think before you ink - 3 views

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    In an article published in Psychology Today, US psychologist and business administrator Steve Albrecht argues that companies are violating freedom of expression with policies on tattoos and piercings, claiming that they want their employees to appear professional. "Doctors, teachers, lawyers, brain surgeons, astrophysicists, cops, fire-fighters and grandmothers have tattoos," Albrecht said.
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    nowadays most people gladly tattoo themselves to add to their image as indelible touch, but it is worth remembering that sometimes the image is nothing but work everything. So, it is better do not risk a career.
Abdul Naser Tamim

أسطورة اسمها: الخصوصية على شبكة الإنترنت - عالم التقنية - 0 views

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    التقنية! ماذا تعني الخصوصية بالنسبة لكم؟ ربما تدركون معناها جيدًا، لكن تظل ألسنتكم عاجزة عن النطق، حائرة في الإجابة.
shirley

COPY-ME Web Series - 0 views

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    "Copy-me is an animated web series about the sharing of knowledge and open culture. About laws, myths and misconceptions, about the Internet and all the benefits of sharing."

    The idea was artistically and satirically presented using animation series for better understanding and appreciation of the audience.
mark Christopher

IFTF: Cory Doctorow: Redesigning a Broken Internet - 0 views

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    Building and maintaining a global communications network is a tremendous accomplishment. Unfortunately, our internet is broken in relation to the laws and norms of today. The Institute for the Future's Second Curve Internet Series explores vulnerabilities and solutions for an internet that is better suited for our current condition.
larssl

encrytion works - Google Custom Search | Diigo - 1 views

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    Micah Lee's whitepaper on open source encryption tools available in an post-snowden era.
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    Micah Lee's whitepaper on open source encryption tools available in an post-snowden era.
mbittman

Here's Why Public Wifi is a Public Health Hazard - Matter - Medium - 3 views

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    Story on Public WiFi
    We took a hacker to a café and, in 20 minutes, he knew where everyone else was born, what schools they attended, and the last five things they googled.

    By Maurits Martijn, from De Correspondent
    Translated from Dutch by Jona Meijers
    Illustrations by Kristina Collantes
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