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Matti Narkia

Dr. Joe's E-News - A Diabetes Newsletter: East German Infants Taking Vitamin D - 0 views

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    "From 1955 to 1990, all infants in East Germany received 600,000 IU of Vitamin D every three months for a total of 3,600,000 IU at age 18 months.

    With the 400 IU/day recommendation of the American Pediatric Association in mind, I ran across this amazing paper while surfing Medline for Vitamin D. According to this paper, all infants in the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) received dangerously high doses of Vitamin D every three months in their doctors office. The policy was in place for 35 years. The first 600,000 IU dose was given at three months and then every three months until the child was 18 months of age. This works out to an average of 6,000 IU per day (actually, for several technical reasons it is not equivalent) for 18 months. The authors collected blood before the dose and then 2 weeks after the quarterly dose to obtain 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)D, and calcium levels on a total of 43 infants.

    Before the first dose, at 3 months of age, the average infant was extremely deficient (median 25(OH)D of 7 ng/ml). Two weeks after the first dose the average 25(OH)D level was 120 ng/ml, the second dose 170 ng/ml, the third dose, 180 ng/ml, the fourth dose, 144 ng/ml, the fifth dose, 110 ng/ml and after the sixth and final dose, 3.6 million total units, at age 18 months, the children had mean levels of 100 ng/ml. That is, by the 15 and 18 month doses, the children were beginning to effectively handle these massive doses.

    The highest level recorded in any of the 43 infants was 408 ng/ml at age 9 months, two weeks after the third 600,000 IU dose. Thirty-four percent of the infants had at least one episode of hypercalcemia but only 3 had an elevated serum 1,25(OH)D. The authors reported that all the infants appeared healthy, even the infant with a level of 408 ng/ml, that is, no clinical toxicity was noted in any of these infants."
Matti Narkia

Obesity and Vitamin D - vitamindcouncil.org - 0 views

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    Obesity and Vitamin D
    One third of Americans are obese. While much of that epidemic is surely due to playing Nintendo instead of baseball, or the consumption of soft drinks instead of water, does that explain
    it all? Is it a coincidence that the twin epidemics of obesity and vitamin D deficiency are occurring together?
Matti Narkia

Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency; Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - 9(... - 0 views

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    Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.
    Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Zasloff M, Heaney RP.
    Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9(1):107-18.
    PMID: 18076342

    The recent discovery - in a randomised, controlled trial - that daily ingestion of 1100 IU of colecalciferol (vitamin D) over a 4-year period dramatically reduced the incidence of non-skin cancers makes it difficult to overstate the potential medical, social and economic implications of treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency stands implicated in a host of diseases other than cancer. The metabolic product of vitamin D is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, secosteroid hormone that targets > 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. A common misconception is that government agencies designed present intake recommendations to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiency. They did not. Instead, they are guidelines to prevent particular metabolic bone diseases. Official recommendations were never designed and are not effective in preventing or treating vitamin D deficiency and in no way limit the freedom of the physician - or responsibility - to do so. At this time, assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure that treatment is adequate and safe. The authors believe that treatment should be sufficient to maintain levels found in humans living naturally in a sun-rich environment, that is, > 40 ng/ml, year around. Three treatment modalities exist: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B radiation or supplementation. All treatment modalities have their potential risks and benefits. Benefits of all treatment modalities outweigh potential risks and greatly outweigh the risk of no treatment. As a prolonged 'vitamin D winter', centred on the winter solstice, occurs at many temperate latitudes, ≤ 5000 IU (125 μg) of vitamin D/d
Matti Narkia

Athletic Performance and Vitamin D : Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise - 0 views

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    Athletic performance and vitamin D.
    Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Sorenson MB, Taft TN, Anderson JJ.
    Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 May;41(5):1102-10. Review.
    PMID: 19346976
    doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181930c2b

    Conclusions: Vitamin D may improve athletic performance in vitamin D-deficient athletes. Peak athletic performance may occur when 25(OH)D levels approach those obtained by natural, full-body, summer sun exposure, which is at least 50 ng·mL-1. Such 25(OH)D levels may also protect the athlete from several acute and chronic medical conditions.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D Newsletter Mar 2006 | Dr. Wactawski-Wende, New England Journal of Medicine, a... - 0 views

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    "Good research is good for medicine. The only thing more important than good research is ethical research. The February 16th issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) had a research paper on vitamin D and colon cancer. Was it good research? Was it ethical research? At stake are the lives of 36,000 older American women who agreed to participate in the Women's Health Initiative. "
Matti Narkia

GrassrootsHealth | Vitamin D Action - Vitamin D Scientists' Call to Action Statement - 0 views

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    "We are aware of substantial scientific evidence supporting the role of vitamin D in prevention of cancer. It has been reasonably established that adequate serum vitamin D metabolite levels are associated with substantially lower incidence rates of several types of cancer, including those of the breast, colon, and ovary, and other sites.

    We have concluded that the vitamin D status of most individuals in North America will need to be greatly improved for substantial reduction in incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that higher vitamin D levels are also associated with lower risk of Type I diabetes in children and of multiple sclerosis. Several studies have found that markers of higher vitamin D levels are associated with lower incidence and severity of influenza and several other infectious diseases."
Matti Narkia

The clinical importance of vitamin D (cholecalciferol): a paradigm shift with implicati... - 0 views

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    The clinical importance of vitamin D (cholecalciferol): a paradigm shift with implications for all healthcare providers.
    Vasquez A, Manso G, Cannell J.
    Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Sep-Oct;10(5):28-36; quiz 37, 94. Review.
    PMID: 15478784
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D Deficiency Syndrome (VDDS) John Jacob Cannell, MD December 27, 2003 - 0 views

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    Vitamin D is safe when used in physiological doses (those used by Nature). Physiological doses are 3,000-5,000 IU/day, from all sources (sun, diet and supplements). Should hypercalcemia occur with such doses, it is due to vitamin D hypersensitivity syndrome, not vitamin D toxicity. Vitamin D hypersensitivity syndromes include conditions such as primary hyperparathyroidism, occult cancers (especially lymphoma) or granulomatous disease (especially sarcoidosis). In such cases, treatment of vitamin D deficiency should be done under the care of a knowledgeable physician. A serum 25(OH)D, serum 1,25(OH)D, PTH and SMA will lead the clinician in the right direction.
Matti Narkia

Epidemic influenza and vitamin D. - Epidemiol Infect. 2006 Dec;134(6):1129-40. (full t... - 0 views

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    Epidemic influenza and vitamin D.
    Cannell JJ, Vieth R, Umhau JC, Holick MF, Grant WB, Madronich S, Garland CF, Giovannucci E.
    Epidemiol Infect. 2006 Dec;134(6):1129-40. Epub 2006 Sep 7. Review.
    PMID: 16959053
Matti Narkia

Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. - Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9... - 0 views

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    Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.
    Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Zasloff M, Heaney RP.
    Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9(1):107-18.
    PMID: 18076342
    DOI 10.1517/14656566.9.1.107
Matti Narkia

Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency; Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - 9(... - 0 views

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    Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.
    Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Zasloff M, Heaney RP.
    Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9(1):107-18.
    PMID: 18076342
    DOI 10.1517/14656566.9.1.107
Matti Narkia

Cod liver oil, vitamin A toxicity, frequent respiratory infections, and the vitamin D d... - 0 views

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    Cod liver oil, vitamin A toxicity, frequent respiratory infections, and the vitamin D deficiency epidemic.
    Cannell JJ, Vieth R, Willett W, Zasloff M, Hathcock JN, White JH, Tanumihardjo SA, Larson-Meyer DE, Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Lamberg-Allardt CJ, Lappe JM, Norman AW, Zittermann A, Whiting SJ, Grant WB, Hollis BW, Giovannucci E.
    Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2008 Nov;117(11):864-70. Review.
    PMID: 19102134

    Until we have better information on doses of vitamin D that will reliably provide adequate blood levels of
    25(OH)D without toxicity, treatment of vitamin D deficiency in otherwise healthy children should be individualized
    according to the numerous factors that affect 25(OH)D levels, such as body weight, percent body fat,
    skin melanin, latitude, season of the year, and sun exposure.2 The doses of sunshine or oral vitamin D3 used
    in healthy children should be designed to maintain 25(OH)D levels above 50 ng/mL. As a rule, in the absence
    of significant sun exposure, we believe that most healthy children need about 1,000 IU of vitamin D3 daily
    per 11 kg (25 lb) of body weight to obtain levels greater than 50 ng/mL. Some will need more, and others less.
    In our opinion, children with chronic illnesses such as autism, diabetes, and/or frequent infections should be
    supplemented with higher doses of sunshine or vitamin D3, doses adequate to maintain their 25(OH)D levels
    in the mid-normal of the reference range (65 ng/mL) - and should be so supplemented year round. Otolaryngologists
    treating children are in a good position to both diagnose and treat vitamin D deficiency.
Matti Narkia

The Truth About Vitamin D Toxicity - 0 views

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    Vitamin D Toxicity Fears Unwarranted

    Is vitamin D toxic? Not if we take the same amount nature intended when we go out in the sun. Vieth R. Vitamin D supplementation, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration, and safety. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;69:842-56. Vieth attempted to dispel unwarranted fears in medical community of physiological doses of vitamin D in 1999 with his exhaustive and well-written review.

    D-Lite, Renew, & SunSplash UV/Tanning Systems Sunsplash Tanning System Is toxicity a concern for you? If so, then increase your levels the way nature intended, with ultraviolet B light! His conclusions: fear of vitamin D toxicity is unwarranted, and such unwarranted fear, bordering on hysteria, is rampant in the medical profession. Vieth R, Chan PC, MacFarlane GD. Efficacy and safety of vitamin D3 intake exceeding the lowest observed adverse effect level. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Feb;73(2):288-94. Even Ian Monroe, the chair of the relevant IOM committee, wrote to the Journal to compliment Vieth's work and to promise his findings will be considered at the time of a future Institute of Medicine review. Munro I. Derivation of tolerable upper intake levels of nutrients. Letter, Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;74:865. That was more than two years ago.
Matti Narkia

The Heart Scan Blog: The Marshall Protocol and other fairy tales - 0 views

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    True to form, Dr. John Cannell has published yet another wonderfully insightful Vitamin D Newsletter.

    One item caught my eye, a response to a question about the Marshall Protocol. I, like Dr. Cannell, was inundated with questions about this so-called protocol, which amounts to little more than the unfounded speculations of a non-physician, actually someone not even involved in health care.

    In all honesty, I blew the whole issue off after I read Dr. Marshall's rants. They smack of pure quackery, though from somebody who clearly has a command of scientific lingo. To Dr. Cannell's credit, he took the time and effort to construct a rational response in the latest issue of the newsletter. I reproduce his response here:
Matti Narkia

"Marshall protocol." - Vitamin D Newsletter Apr 2008 | Vitamin D Question and Answer - 0 views

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    I have been inundated with letters asking about Professor Marshall's recent "discovery." Some have written that to say they have stopped their vitamin D and are going to avoid the sun in order to begin the "Marshall protocol." The immediate cause of this angst is two publications, a press article in Science Daily about Professor Marshall's "study" (which is no study but simply an opinion) in BioEssays. Dr. Trevor Marshall has two degrees, both in electrical engineering
Matti Narkia

On the epidemiology of influenza - Virology Journal | Full text - 0 views

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    On the epidemiology of influenza.
    Cannell JJ, Zasloff M, Garland CF, Scragg R, Giovannucci E.
    Virol J. 2008 Feb 25;5:29. Review.
    PMID: 18298852
    doi:10.1186/1743-422X-5-29
Matti Narkia

The antibiotic vitamin: deficiency in vitamin D may predispose people to infection | Sc... - 0 views

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    In the July 2005 FASEB Journal, Adrian F. Gombart of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and his colleagues reported that vitamin D boosts production in white blood cells of one of the antimicrobial compounds that defends the body against germs.\n\nImmediately, Cannell says, the proverbial lightbulb went on in his head: Maybe the high doses of vitamin D that he had been prescribing to virtually all the men on his ward had boosted their natural arsenal of the antimicrobial, called cathelicidin, and protected them from flu. Cannell had been administering the vitamin D because his patients, like many other people in the industrial world, had shown a deficiency:
Matti Narkia

Autism and vitamin D - Med Hypotheses. 2008 - 0 views

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    Autism and vitamin D.
    Cannell JJ.
    Med Hypotheses. 2008;70(4):750-9. Epub 2007 Oct 24.
    PMID: 17920208
Matti Narkia

Use of vitamin D in clinical practice. - Altern Med Rev. 2008 Mar - 0 views

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    Use of vitamin D in clinical practice.
    Cannell JJ, Hollis BW.
    Altern Med Rev. 2008 Mar;13(1):6-20.
    PMID: 18377099

    The recent discovery--from a meta-analysis of 18 randomized controlled trials--that supplemental cholecalciferol (vitamin D) significantly reduces all-cause mortality emphasizes the medical, ethical, and legal implications of promptly diagnosing and adequately treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, and probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency is implicated in most of the diseases of civilization. Vitamin D's final metabolic product is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, seco-steroid hormone that targets more than 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. One of the most important genes vitamin D up-regulates is for cathelicidin, a naturally occurring broad-spectrum antibiotic. Natural vitamin D levels, those found in humans living in a sun-rich environment, are between 40-70 ng per ml, levels obtained by few modern humans. Assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure treatment is adequate and safe. Three treatment modalities exist for vitamin D deficiency: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, and vitamin D3 supplementation. Treatment of vitamin D deficiency in otherwise healthy patients with 2,000-7,000 IU vitamin D per day should be sufficient to maintain year-round 25(OH)D levels between 40-70 ng per mL. In those with serious illnesses associated with vitamin D deficiency, such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, autism, and a host of other illnesses, doses should be sufficient to maintain year-round 25(OH)D levels between 55 -70 ng per mL. Vitamin D-deficient patients with serious illness should not only be supplemented more aggressively than the well, they should have more frequent monitoring of serum 25(OH)D and serum calcium. Vitamin D should always be
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