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Martin Leicht

Distracted Minds: Why You Should Teach Like a Poet - 4 views

  • Routine is a great deadener of attention.
  • When you follow the same routines at home, folding the laundry or doing the dishes, your mind goes on automatic pilot.
  • same generic suite of teaching activities: listen to a lecture, take notes, ask some questions, talk in groups.
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  • Be astonished.
  • Pay attention.
  • Through the creative turns of language they use to describe the world and our experiences, the familiar becomes unfamiliar again, and we discover in the everyday world fresh food for insight and reflection.
  • We want them to pay attention to course content, to be astonished by what they find there, and to report back to us and the world what they have discovered.
  • Find an everyday object that connects to your discipline, or a photograph or image that accompanies an article or book in your field.
  • Close — and I mean really close — reading.
  • in which practitioners slowly read the sacred scriptures of Judaism aloud to one another, pausing and discussing and questioning at every turn.
  • Tell about it.
  • asked what they had learned from the experience, and especially what they had noticed about the text that they hadn’t perceived before
    • Martin Leicht
       
      Metacognition exercise of sorts?
  • Engagement with objects.
  • pointed out anomalies and inconsistencies, and wondered
  • What? For the first step, students spend time just observing the object and taking notes.
  • So what? Students write down questions based on their observations and share them with one another.
  • Now what? The final stage shifts into more whole-class and teacher-centered discussion
  • Attention through assessments.
  • For 13 consecutive weeks, she asked students to leave the campus and make a visit to the nearby Worcester Art Museum in order to spend time in front of the same work of art.
  • As they learned to train their attention on a work of art, their attention brought them insights. They saw more clearly, developed new ideas, and wrote creatively about what they observed.
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    Could some or all of this work online to build engagement? 1) close reading 2) engage with objects 3) attention through assessments
Jeff Andersen

elearn Magazine: Five Expectations Students Should Have of an Online Instructor - 8 views

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    In recent years, online degree programs have become a widely accepted modality for many learners who seek a college degree. Most often, students who choose the flexibility of online college courses have family or work obligations that inhibit their ability to be placed in a traditional classroom. Online learning is a great choice for a student who is a self-motivated, and who is an independent learner.
Nigel Coutts

How might we prepare our students for an unknown future? - The Learner's Way - 10 views

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    How might we prepare our students for an unknown future? If we accept that we are living in times of rapid change and that the world our children will inhabit is likely to be very different from the world of today, or perhaps more importantly, different from the work our current education system was designed to serve, what should we do to ensure our children are able to thrive?
C CC

Using metacognition during exams - a guide for teachers and students - UKEdChat - 29 views

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    A useful guide developed to help teachers and students use metacognition and metacognitive skills during the exam period.
Nigel Coutts

In Postnormal Times our Students need to be Brave - The Learner's Way - 13 views

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    If we are to cultivate the dispositions required in these times of postnormality and post-truth we need to establish cultures in our classrooms which will allow them to thrive. 
Clint Heitz

Supporting Students With Chronic Trauma | Edutopia - 16 views

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    "De-escalation strategies can help prevent students' emotional outbursts, and aid them and their peers in finding calm after one."
afager212

Using Social Bookmarking in Schools and with your Students- Part Two | Silvia Tolisano-... - 17 views

    • afager212
       
      Could be a useful tool when just starting
  • need to evaluate and interpret information tag bookmarks (their own and/or the ones collected by their teacher) summarize bookmarks (their own and/or the ones shared by teacher) take advantage of “experts in the field” (by subscribing to their RSS for specific tags) learn to search for relevant information beyond “googling” collaborate with other members of a study group (local or global)
  • Remember that it is NOT about the tools we use with our students, but the skills we are exposing them to and want them to get proficient in.
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  • a critical mistake when introducing digital tools by assuming that armed with a username and a password, students will automatically find meaningful ways to learn together.
  • Handout_SocialBookmarkingRoles.pdf
Phil Taylor

Are Our Educators Prepared For Their Students? | My Island View - 11 views

  • The past learning experiences of educators are so different from the current and evolving experiences of their students that relevance as an educator is extremely important.
  • In the 20th century information was for the most part slower to change and often controlled by a small group of power brokers.
  • Smartphones, which are not really phones, but powerful computers with phone capabilities.
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  • Developing students who are flexible and willing to continually learn is the best we can do to insure their future.
Nigel Coutts

Helping students to become problem finders - The Learner's Way - 44 views

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    For students engaging in creative personalised learning projects such as a 'Genius Hour' or 'Personal Passion project it can often be difficult for them to uncover the right project. Students have become so reliant upon their teachers to pose them problems that when they are given the option to explore one of their own design they don't know where to start. This is indeed a significant challenge as we know that our students will enter a workforce and world of learning beyond school where they must be active problem finders. How then might we provide the support they require without removing the opportunity for truly personalised exploration.  
smilex3md

A tenured professor asks: Are you scared of your students? (essay) - 36 views

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    "Are You Scared of Your Students? A professor wonders whether the classroom has become an unsafe space for the faculty."
Vivian Worley

7 Online Creative Writing Apps to Make Writing Enjoyable for Students - 106 views

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    Writer's block-sometimes it feels like less of a block and more of an insurmountable wall. Inspiration can seem to be a million miles away, with no hope of being reached. Thanks to the scores of online creative writing apps we can access today, it doesn't have to be that way anymore.
Martin Burrett

Session 315: Tips for dealing with disruptive pupils - 28 views

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    "The discussion begun which participants talking about what they viewed as disruption. Most people agreed that swinging on chairs, being late and calling out were disruptive to learning (although many felt that the root causes needed to be identified and addressed), but there was genuine disagreement about pupil interaction and banter with some UKEdChatters saying this was an inappropriate distraction, while others said they enjoyed and welcome this, at least to a point."
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