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Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Rosuvastatin to Prevent Vascular Events in Men and Women with Elevated C-Reacti... - 0 views

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    Conclusions In this trial of apparently healthy persons without hyperlipidemia but with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, rosuvastatin significantly reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events. \n\nRosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein.\nRidker PM, Danielson E, Fonseca FA, Genest J, Gotto AM Jr, Kastelein JJ, Koenig W, Libby P, Lorenzatti AJ, MacFadyen JG, Nordestgaard BG, Shepherd J, Willerson JT, Glynn RJ; JUPITER Study Group.\nN Engl J Med. 2008 Nov 20;359(21):2195-207. Epub 2008 Nov 9.\nPMID: 18997196
Matti Narkia

Vitamin K2: An update - Heart Scan Resource Center - Track Your Plaque - 0 views

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    Deficiency of K2 in both mice and humans is associated with coronary calcification; low vitamin K2 levels are associated with increased activity of Gla matrix protein, an enzyme that causes calcium deposition in artery walls. People who take warfarin (Coumadin®), a potent blocker of vitamin K2, experience more arterial and heart valve calcification.

    The 2004 Rotterdam Heart Study was the experience that really brought this concept closer to our interests. This well-conducted study of 4800 Dutch demonstrated an association of vitamin K2 intake with 57% reduction in cardiovascular events and lesser degrees of aortic calcification (another surrogate for atherosclerosis). Benefit appeared to be associated with a daily K2 intake of 32.7 micrograms per day (Geleijnse JM et al 2004). An important corollary of this study is that it suggests that a vitamin K2-mediated reduction in coronary calcification is accompanied by reduced likelihood of heart attack and other events.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D: A potential role in cardiovascular disease prevention - theheart.org - 0 views

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    "November 24, 2009 | Lisa Nainggolan

    Orlando, FL - Inadequate levels of vitamin D are associated with an increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease and death, a new observational study has found. Dr Tami L Bair (Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, UT) reported the findings here at the American Heart Association 2009 Scientific Sessions.

    Bair and colleagues followed more than 27 000 people 50 years or older with no history of cardiovascular disease for just over a year and found that those with very low levels of vitamin D (<15 ng />30 ng/mL). Those deficient in vitamin D were also twice as likely to develop heart failure as those with normal levels.

    "We concluded that even a moderate deficiency of vitamin D was associated with developing coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and death," said coauthor Dr Heidi May (Intermountain Medical Center). However, "it is not known whether this is a cause and effect relationship," she told heartwire. Because this study was observational, more research is needed "to better establish the association between vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular disease," she noted."
Matti Narkia

NephroPal: Vitamin D - summary of actions - 0 views

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    "Below is a list of summary of actions of Vitamin D (Hormone D)"
Matti Narkia

Cardiovascular Risk and {alpha}-Linolenic Acid: Can Costa Rica Clarify? -- Harris 118 (... - 0 views

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    Cardiovascular risk and alpha-linolenic acid: can Costa Rica clarify?
    Harris WS.
    Circulation. 2008 Jul 22;118(4):323-4. Epub 2008 Jul 7. Review. PMID: 18606912
    doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.108.791467
Matti Narkia

Independent Association of Low Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D Le... - 0 views

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    Independent association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin d levels with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.
    Dobnig H, Pilz S, Scharnagl H, Renner W, Seelhorst U, Wellnitz B, Kinkeldei J, Boehm BO, Weihrauch G, Maerz W.
    Arch Intern Med. 2008 Jun 23;168(12):1340-9.
    PMID: 18574092

    Conclusions Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels are independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. A causal relationship has yet to be proved by intervention trials using vitamin D.
Matti Narkia

Sunlight and Vitamin D: both good for cardiovascular health. - 0 views

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    Sunlight and vitamin D: both good for cardiovascular health.
    Holick MF.
    J Gen Intern Med. 2002 Sep;17(9):733-5.
    PMID: 12220371
    doi: 10.1046/j.1525-1497.2002.20731.x.
Matti Narkia

YouTube - Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention - 0 views

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    Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention by Dr. David C. Sane
Matti Narkia

We Can Control Our Aging - 0 views

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    Health Watch Center provides latest information, news and useful tips for a happy and healthy lifestyle. Information on various health issues such as allergies, blood disorders, cancers, heart diseases, mental disorders, men's disorders, sleep disorders, STDs, skin disorders, and many other treatments.
Matti Narkia

Type II Diabetes Alternative Treatments - 0 views

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    Alternative Medicine Blog offers complete information on all types of alternative medicines available for treatment. Know more about various alternative treatment methods like message therapy, acupuncture, hypnosis, yoga, meditation, Tai Chi, homeopathy, Reiki, aromatherapy, and many other alternative health methods.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D deficiency an important, common, and easily treatable cardiovascular risk fac... - 0 views

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    Vitamin D deficiency an important, common, and easily treatable cardiovascular risk factor?\nLee JH, O'Keefe JH, Bell D, Hensrud DD, Holick MF.\nJ Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Dec 9;52(24):1949-56. Review.\nPMID: 19055985
Matti Narkia

Independent Association of Low Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D Le... - 0 views

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    Independent association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin d levels with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.\nDobnig H, Pilz S, Scharnagl H, Renner W, Seelhorst U, Wellnitz B, Kinkeldei J, Boehm BO, Weihrauch G, Maerz W.\nArch Intern Med. 2008 Jun 23;168(12):1340-9.\nPMID: 18574092
Matti Narkia

n-3 fatty acid dietary recommendations and food sources to achieve essentiality and car... - 0 views

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    n-3 fatty acid dietary recommendations and food sources to achieve essentiality and cardiovascular benefits.
    Gebauer SK, Psota TL, Harris WS, Kris-Etherton PM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6 Suppl):1526S-1535S. Review.
    PMID: 16841863

    Dietary recommendations have been made for n-3 fatty acids, including {alpha}-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to achieve nutrient adequacy and to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease. These recommendations are based on a large body of evidence from epidemiologic and controlled clinical studies. The n-3 fatty acid recommendation to achieve nutritional adequacy, defined as the amount necessary to prevent deficiency symptoms, is 0.6-1.2% of energy for ALA; up to 10% of this can be provided by EPA or DHA. To achieve recommended ALA intakes, food sources including flaxseed and flaxseed oil, walnuts and walnut oil, and canola oil are recommended. The evidence base supports a dietary recommendation of {approx}500 mg/d of EPA and DHA for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. For treatment of existing cardiovascular disease, 1 g/d is recommended. These recommendations have been embraced by many health agencies worldwide. A dietary strategy for achieving the 500-mg/d recommendation is to consume 2 fish meals per week (preferably fatty fish). Foods enriched with EPA and DHA or fish oil supplements are a suitable alternate to achieve recommended intakes and may be necessary to achieve intakes of 1 g/d.
Matti Narkia

Study Links Diet Soft Drinks With Cardiac Risk | LiveScience - 0 views

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    Drinking more than one soda a day -- even if it's the sugar-free diet kind -- is associated with an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors linked to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, a study finds
Matti Narkia

Genetic interactions with diet influence the risk of cardiovascular disease -- Ordovas ... - 0 views

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    Ordovas JM.
    Genetic interactions with diet influence the risk of cardiovascular disease.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;83(2):443S-446S. Review.
    PMID: 16470010 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Matti Narkia

Inflammation and cardiovascular disease mechanisms -- Libby 83 (2): 456S -- American Jo... - 0 views

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    Libby P.
    Inflammation and cardiovascular disease mechanisms.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;83(2):456S-460S. Review.
    PMID: 16470012 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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