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Kathryn Reklis

Quiz | ReadTheory - 0 views

  • we are going to draw
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      good job
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Kathryn Reklis

Quiz | ReadTheory - 0 views

shared by Kathryn Reklis about 10 hours ago - No Cached
Clint Heitz

Study Finds Difference In Recollection From Screen Reading Vs. Paper Reading | HuffPost - 0 views

  • The study followed people who used computer screens for learning versus paper reading to learn, and found that while screen learning helped solidify the details of the learning, paper reading helped readers better understand abstract concepts.
  • Better put, concrete memory from reading involves the who and when, whereas abstract concepts tend to lean towards where and why.
  • The results showed that abstract thinking was impacted by computer screens but concrete memory was not.
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  • The basic gist that we can take from it is that when learning something, it may be in your best interests to digest the information from multiple media forms. For example, if you want to recall the dates of certain events, a computer screen may help you better remember them when studying. However, if you want to recall why such an event occurred or where, paper may be your best bet.
  • The next time you go to study something, consider this twofold approach. Perhaps read up on the topics online and then print out the cliff notes. Next, study those as well. See if this helps you store all of the abstract and concrete information better.
Clint Heitz

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens - Scientific ... - 0 views

  • The matter is by no means settled. Before 1992 most studies concluded that people read slower, less accurately and less comprehensively on screens than on paper. Studies published since the early 1990s, however, have produced more inconsistent results: a slight majority has confirmed earlier conclusions, but almost as many have found few significant differences in reading speed or comprehension between paper and screens. And recent surveys suggest that although most people still prefer paper—especially when reading intensively—attitudes are changing as tablets and e-reading technology improve and reading digital books for facts and fun becomes more common.
  • Compared with paper, screens may also drain more of our mental resources while we are reading and make it a little harder to remember what we read when we are done. A parallel line of research focuses on people's attitudes toward different kinds of media. Whether they realize it or not, many people approach computers and tablets with a state of mind less conducive to learning than the one they bring to paper.
  • Both anecdotally and in published studies, people report that when trying to locate a particular piece of written information they often remember where in the text it appeared. We might recall that we passed the red farmhouse near the start of the trail before we started climbing uphill through the forest; in a similar way, we remember that we read about Mr. Darcy rebuffing Elizabeth Bennett on the bottom of the left-hand page in one of the earlier chapters.
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  • At least a few studies suggest that by limiting the way people navigate texts, screens impair comprehension.
  • Because of their easy navigability, paper books and documents may be better suited to absorption in a text. "The ease with which you can find out the beginning, end and everything inbetween and the constant connection to your path, your progress in the text, might be some way of making it less taxing cognitively, so you have more free capacity for comprehension," Mangen says.
  • An e-reader always weighs the same, regardless of whether you are reading Proust's magnum opus or one of Hemingway's short stories. Some researchers have found that these discrepancies create enough "haptic dissonance" to dissuade some people from using e-readers. People expect books to look, feel and even smell a certain way; when they do not, reading sometimes becomes less enjoyable or even unpleasant. For others, the convenience of a slim portable e-reader outweighs any attachment they might have to the feel of paper books.
  • In one of his experiments 72 volunteers completed the Higher Education Entrance Examination READ test—a 30-minute, Swedish-language reading-comprehension exam consisting of multiple-choice questions about five texts averaging 1,000 words each. People who took the test on a computer scored lower and reported higher levels of stress and tiredness than people who completed it on paper.
  • Perhaps, then, any discrepancies in reading comprehension between paper and screens will shrink as people's attitudes continue to change. The star of "A Magazine Is an iPad That Does Not Work" is three-and-a-half years old today and no longer interacts with paper magazines as though they were touchscreens, her father says. Perhaps she and her peers will grow up without the subtle bias against screens that seems to lurk in the minds of older generations. In current research for Microsoft, Sellen has learned that many people do not feel much ownership of e-books because of their impermanence and intangibility: "They think of using an e-book, not owning an e-book," she says. Participants in her studies say that when they really like an electronic book, they go out and get the paper version. This reminds Sellen of people's early opinions of digital music, which she has also studied. Despite initial resistance, people love curating, organizing and sharing digital music today. Attitudes toward e-books may transition in a similar way, especially if e-readers and tablets allow more sharing and social interaction than they currently do.
Martin Burrett

Makers Empire 3D - 9 views

    "An interesting 3D design platform with challenges to aid learning and a variety of options. Free version has limited shapes library."
Martin Burrett

7 Plenary Activities for Newly Qualified Teachers by @RichardJARogers - 6 views

    "I loved competitions when I was a kid. Anything involving puzzles, quizzes or games really excited me. In truth: I loved being right and I hated being wrong!

    School can be quite a competitive environment. Some of our students can really feel the pressure when it comes to scoring highly on tests, exams and extra-curricular tournaments and events."
Nigel Coutts

The Power of Relationship for Positive School Climate - The Learner's Way - 17 views

    In teaching and for learning relationships are everything.  

    This is one of those statements that cannot be overstated, it is true now, it has always been true.To craft a truly positive school climate demands our fullest attention to every detail of every relationship we build but the effort is well worth it.  
Martin Burrett

5 steps to becoming an education hero - 17 views

    "Helping to inspire those around us can lead to a very fulfilling and worthwhile life, and teaching is no different. Beyond inspiring and encouraging our students, the opportunities are there to share and inspire colleagues, who will mainly welcome new ideas, resources, or different ways of approaching situations."
Martin Burrett

Students who are old for their year-group more likely to enrol in college - 5 views

    "Teens who are older in their school year appear to feel more confident about their academic abilities and are more likely to enrolenrolollege than their younger peers, according to research published by the American Psychological Association."
Jørgen Mortensen

Three Reasons Students Should Own Your Classroom's Twitter and Instagram Accounts - EdS... - 49 views

  • Three Reasons Students Should Own Your Classroom’s Twitter and Instagram Accounts
  • We must think more critically about how we communicate via social media.
  • 1. Genuine Digital Citizenship Opportunities
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  • 2. Publishing for the World (and the Classroom Across the Hall) is Powerful
  • 3. Establishing Your Classroom Brand
  • According to educators Joe Sanfelippo and Tony Sinanis, branding can be defined as “the marking practice of creating a name, symbol or design that identifies and differentiates a product from other products.” Within the past few years, this idea of branding our schools/classrooms has become extremely valuable, as it promotes transparency by painting an accurate, live picture of what is taking place. Yet, in reality, the majority of the time the educators are the ones telling these stories. While this certainly has its place, ultimately what matters most is how students feel about their experiences. Social media has allowed my students to share our classroom happenings through their eyes. It has allowed my students the opportunity to both establish and share the culture of our classroom and our school, and ultimately create our “brand”.
    Steve- do your students run your Twitter and Instagram accounts? How many students contribute regularly? any problems with parents?
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