Skip to main content

Home/ Groups/ Diigo In Education
Pablo Cánepa

PDF a DOCX - Convertir PDF a DOCX online - 0 views

shared by Pablo Cánepa about 15 hours ago - No Cached
  •  
    Excelente hta on-line para convertir PDF
slopezvedu

La curiosa cena de Navidad entre soldados nazis y americanos - 0 views

    • slopezvedu
       
      La película Silent Night recrea este hecho histórico.
slopezvedu

"La prensa infantil en España", primer recorrido histórico a través de las pu... - 0 views

    • slopezvedu
       
      Interesa realizar una revisión previa a la obra de Francisco Mariano Nipho y Cagigal y su concepción educativa de la prensa.
slopezvedu

El impresionante crecimiento de la población mundial, visto con puntos amarillos - 2 views

    • slopezvedu
       
      Para obter datos das cifras de poboación en España é preciso acoder á paxina do INE (ine.es).
slopezvedu

Dime dónde vives y te diré qué produce tu provincia (y dónde lo vende) | Econ... - 1 views

    • slopezvedu
       
      Partindo dos datos rexistrados en 2016, pois o exercicio de 2017 aínda non se pechou e non hai datos cos que poder facer balance.
slopezvedu

Publica los cuentos de tu hijo con Tikatok - Educación 2.0 - 0 views

    • slopezvedu
       
      Pode ser interesante para elaborar relatos narrativos a partir dun feito histórico, pasalos a un formato de banda deseñada e dispoñer deles de xeito dixital para o propio traballo na aula.
  •  
    Espacio digital para la publicación de cuentos en Internet.
Martin Burrett

UKEdChat Magazine - Issue 46 - 13 views

  •  
    Free and open magazine for educators
Martin Burrett

UKEdChat Magazine - Issue 46 [Early Access] - 2 views

  •  
    UKEdChat Patrons get early access to the latest UKEdChat magazine.
E Barney

Noun Project - Icons for Education - 15 views

  •  
    half price discount for royalty-free licenses for NounPro icons, w/ svg & color options built in - and apps to incorporate library into Powerpoint, Photoshop, etc.
Martin Burrett

Genius Hour Projects: Not just for Primary Schools by @hecticteacher - 20 views

  •  
    "Genius Hour: From discussions with Primary school teacher friends of mine it was pointed out that something happened in Year 7 that changed students from the risk taking and independent learners that they were in Year 6 into passive learners by the end of Year 7. I had noticed the same thing with my own niece as she transitioned from primary to secondary, so I started to think about what was causing it. The more I looked the more I noticed that in secondary there is very little opportunity for students to make choices or take ownership of their learning and I wanted to change this."
Martin Burrett

Reading to therapy dogs improves literacy attitudes in second-grade students - 7 views

  •  
    "Second-grade students who read aloud to dogs in an after-school program demonstrated improved attitudes about reading, according to researchers at Tufts Institute for Human-Animal Interaction at Tufts University. Their research appears online in advance of print in the Early Childhood Education Journal.

    Reading skills are often associated with improved academic performance and positive attitudes about school in children. Researchers wanted to learn if animal-assisted intervention in the form of reading aloud to dogs in a classroom setting could contribute to improved skills and attitudes."
Martin Burrett

Storytime a 'turbocharger' for a child's brain - 8 views

  •  
    "Storytime: While reading to children has many benefits, simply speaking the words aloud may not be enough to improve cognitive development in preschoolers.

    A new international study, published in the journal PLOS ONE and led by researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, shows that engaging with children while reading books to them gives their brain a cognitive "boost.""
jnet0124

Can Mary Shelley's Frankenstein be read as an early research ethics text? | Medical Hum... - 6 views

shared by jnet0124 on 13 Nov 17 - No Cached
  • Can Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein be read as an early research ethics text?
    • jnet0124
       
      SEE HEAR
  • Frankenstein is an early and balanced text on the ethics of research upon human subjects and that it provides insights that are as valid today as when the novel was written.
  • Mary Shelley conceived the idea for and started writing Frankenstein in 1816 and it was first published in 1818.1 In its historical context, the earlier 17th and 18th centuries had seen the early signs of the rise of science and experimentation. Francis Bacon (1561–1626) had laid the theoretical foundations in his “Great Insauration”2 and scientists such as Boyle, Newton, and Hooke developed the experimental methods. Sir Robert Talbor, a 17th century apothecary and one of the key figures in developing the use of quinine to treat fevers, underlined this: “the most plausible reasons unless backed by some demonstrable experiments seem but suppositions or conjectures”.3
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • The 18th century saw the continued construction of foundations upon which all subsequent medical experimentation has been built.
  • Lady Mary Montagu promoted smallpox vaccination; its proponents experimented on prisoners to study its efficacy, and James Jurin, the secretary of the Royal Society, developed mathematical proof of this in the face of ecclesiastical opposition.4 Many of the modern concepts of therapeutic trials were described although not widely accepted. Empirical observation through experimentation was starting to be recognised as the tool that allowed ascertainment of fact and truth. An account of Dr Bianchini’s experiments on “Le Medicin Electrique”, reported to the Royal Society explains that “The experiments were made by Dr Bianchini assisted by several curious and learned men … who not being able to separate what was true … determined to be guided by their own experiments and it was by this most troublesome though of all the others the most sure way, that they have learned to reject a great number of what have been published as facts.”5
  • Similarly, Henry Baker’s report to the Royal Society, describing Abbe Nollet’s experiments, outlined the need for comparative studies and that “treatment should not be condemned without a fair trial”6 and a Belgian doctor, Professor Lambergen, describing the use of deadly nightshade for the treatment of breast cancer wrote “Administration of this plant certainly merits the attention of the medical profession; and surely one may add entitles the medicine to future trials … nevertheless the most efficacious medicines are such if its efficacy by repeated trials be approved.”7

    In the mid 18th century James Lind conducted the first controlled trial to establish a cure for scurvy and his Treatise on the Scurvy contains what could be seen in modern terminology as the first “review of the current literature” prior to a clinical trial.8

  • Her motives for writing Frankenstein are more difficult to define. In her introduction to the 1831 edition she writes that she wanted her work to

    … speak to the mysterious fears of our nature and awaken thrilling horror—one to make the reader dread to look round. If I did not accomplish these things, my ghost story would be unworthy of its name … (p 7, p 8)

  • The 1818 preface, written by Percy Bysshe Shelley, indicates a deeper purpose. He wrote that the story recommends itself as it “…affords a point of view on the imagination for the delineating of human passions more comprehensive and commanding than any which the ordinary relations of existing events can yield…” (p 11) and that “…I am by no means indifferent to the manner in which ... moral tendencies (that) exist in the sentiments of characters shall affect the reader…”(p 12).
1 - 20 of 27270 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page