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Lisa C. Hurst

Inside the School Silicon Valley Thinks Will Save Education | WIRED - 9 views

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    "AUTHOR: ISSIE LAPOWSKY. ISSIE LAPOWSKY DATE OF PUBLICATION: 05.04.15. 05.04.15 TIME OF PUBLICATION: 7:00 AM. 7:00 AM INSIDE THE SCHOOL SILICON VALLEY THINKS WILL SAVE EDUCATION Click to Open Overlay Gallery Students in the youngest class at the Fort Mason AltSchool help their teacher, Jennifer Aguilar, compile a list of what they know and what they want to know about butterflies. CHRISTIE HEMM KLOK/WIRED SO YOU'RE A parent, thinking about sending your 7-year-old to this rogue startup of a school you heard about from your friend's neighbor's sister. It's prospective parent information day, and you make the trek to San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood. You walk up to the second floor of the school, file into a glass-walled conference room overlooking a classroom, and take a seat alongside dozens of other parents who, like you, feel that public schools-with their endless bubble-filled tests, 38-kid classrooms, and antiquated approach to learning-just aren't cutting it. At the same time, you're thinking: this school is kind of weird. On one side of the glass is a cheery little scene, with two teachers leading two different middle school lessons on opposite ends of the room. But on the other side is something altogether unusual: an airy and open office with vaulted ceilings, sunlight streaming onto low-slung couches, and rows of hoodie-wearing employees typing away on their computers while munching on free snacks from the kitchen. And while you can't quite be sure, you think that might be a robot on wheels roaming about. Then there's the guy who's standing at the front of the conference room, the school's founder. Dressed in the San Francisco standard issue t-shirt and jeans, he's unlike any school administrator you've ever met. But the more he talks about how this school uses technology to enhance and individualize education, the more you start to like what he has to say. And so, if you are truly fed up with the school stat
Tony Baldasaro

Weblogg-ed » Opening Day(s) - 0 views

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    It's been great fun to get to share a part of eight school opening days this year from Mississippi to Vermont. They're always filled with a great deal of energy, and they're also a good way of getting a sense of where things are in terms of schools' evolution (or lack thereof) in thinking around technology in a teaching and learning context. I'd love to be able to say that it feels like we're a lot farther down the road, but by and large, that's not the what I'm seeing. There is still a real emphasis on the implementation of "stuff" without the hard conversations about pedagogy that deal with preparing kids for a connected world. There are pockets of that, but not much that is being discussed within the frame of a long-term plan or real vision as to what classroom learning is going to look like in say, ten or even five years. (I put out a Tweet last week asking what the timeframe was for the technology plans at the schools where people are teaching, and most said three years with an occasional five year plan or a "Technology plan? What's that?" thrown in. I'm wondering, by the way, when we'll stop calling them technology plans and just call them learning plans.)
Marc Patton

Digital Learning Day :: Online Course - 70 views

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    This free, Massive Online Open Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) developed by the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at NC State University, is designed to help educators like you successfully lead the digital learning transition of K-12 education.
alexis alexander

How to Save College | The Awl - 23 views

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    "I wrote a thing last fall about massive open online courses (MOOCs, in the parlance), and the challenge that free or cheap online classes pose to business as usual in higher ed. In that piece, I compared the people running colleges today to music industry executives in the age of Napster. (This was not a flattering comparison.) Aaron Bady, a cultural critic and doctoral candidate at Berkeley, objected. I replied to Bady, one thing led to another, the slippery slope was slupped, and Maria Bustillos ended up refereeing the whole thing here on The Awl."
smilex3md

A Brilliant Plan? | Inside Higher Ed - 13 views

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    Satire. In the article, the author proposes MOOAs (massive open online administrations) and posits that "By having one experienced group of administrators make decisions for hundreds of campuses simultaneously, MOOA would help address these problems expeditiously and economically.  Since MOOA would allow colleges to dispense with most of their own administrators, it would generate substantial cost savings in higher education."
smilex3md

'Watered Down' MOOC Bill Becomes Law In Florida | Inside Higher Ed - 10 views

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    Florida Governor Rick Scott signed a bill into law last week to encourage the state's K-12 and higher education systems to use massive open online courses, or MOOCs. The bill Scott signed allows MOOCs, under certain conditions, to be used to help teach K-12 students in four subjects and also orders Florida education officials to study and set rules that would allow students who have yet to enroll in college to earn transfer credits by taking MOOCs.
Wayne Holly

A Cleaner YouTube | Practical Ed Tech - 81 views

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    YouTube can be a great source of educational material to share in your classroom. Unfortunately, if you try to search YouTube in front of a class you're open to the possibility that something inappropriate will pop-up. 
Dan French

Daniel M. French : POSSCON.org Presentation 03/28/12 - 14 views

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    Presentation by Vermont superintendent Dan French (@danfrench on Twitter) for the Palmetto Open Source Conference (posscon.org). Dan describes an alternative vision for ed organizational change utilizing "lateral innovation networks" based on the concepts described by David Hargreaves (http://www.demos.co.uk/people/davidhargreaves) in "Education Epidemic."
anonymous

University Business - May 2011 [36] - 0 views

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    Collaboration Station: Designing an effective group study space - whether it's out in the open or behind a closed door - takes a team. By Melissa Ezarik (great article on how design impacts study spaces in higher ed)
James Shockley

Web 2.0 Smack Down - 149 views

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    Digital Edition mag Top Stories Benjamin Franklin: An Extraordinary United States Global Change Research National World War II Museum Mayan Math Activity Product Review: StudySync FORUMS How did you choose an SIS? Are schools ready for open source? Can you Google-proof a question using Bloom's Taxonomy? Does online training work? top tech resources LCD or DLP? More.. Subscribe| Customer Service|Contact Us|About Us|eNewsletters|Advertising New Articles From the Classroom Leadership Professional Development Tech/Media Coordinators Tech Talk Studies in Ed Tech Ideas and Opinions How To EdTech Ticker TL Advisor Blog Leader of the Year Awards of Excellence Portraits of Learning Other Contests Upcoming Webinars Data Management Security eLearning Copyright Funding Mobile & Wireless Assessment & Testing Curriculum News & Trends Products Features Editor's Desk Issues Current Issue Newsletters eBooks White Papers Grants Columns Podcasts Web Tours Buyers Guide News Site of the Day QuickFlicks IT Guy Interactive Whiteboards Student Information Systems
Kelvin Thompson

U. of Maine campus experiments with small-scale, high-touch open courses | Inside Highe... - 14 views

  • MOOCs are the new “thneeds,” the oddly-shaped items peddled by the Once-ler in The Lorax: Everybody seems to want one, even if nobody yet knows exactly what they are or what they mean.
Chris Betcher

Iste2011 - K12 Open Ed Wiki - 1 views

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    Philadelphia, PA Karen Fasimpaur karen at k12opened dot com ALL OF THESE RESOURCES ARE OPEN-LICENSED UNDER CC BY. PLEASE SHARE!
Tracy Tuten

The real economics of massive online courses (essay) | Inside Higher Ed - 2 views

  • Is there a model out there, or an institution/student mix that could effectively utilize MOOCs in such a way as to get around this flaw? It’s hard to tell. Recent articles on Inside Higher Ed have suggested that distance education providers (like the University of Maryland’s University College – UMUC) may opt to certify the MOOCs that come out of these elite schools and bake them into their own online programs. Others suggest that MOOCs could be certified by other schools and embedded in prior learning portfolios.
  • The fatal flaw that I referred to earlier is pretty apparent:  the very notions of "mass, open" and selectivity just don’t lend themselves to a workable model that benefits both institutions and students. Our higher education system needs MOOCs to provide credentials in order for students to find it worthwhile to invest the effort, yet colleges can’t afford to provide MOOC credentials without sacrificing prestige, giving up control of the quality of the students who take their courses and running the risk of eventually diluting the value of their education brand in the eyes of the labor market.
  • In other words, as economists tell us, students themselves are an important input to education. The fact that no school uses a lottery system to determine who gets in means that determining who gets in matters a great deal to these schools, because it helps them control quality and head off the adverse effects of unqualified students either dropping out or performing poorly in career positions. For individual institutions, obtaining high quality inputs works to optimize the school’s objective function, which is maximizing prestige.
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  • We also know that there are plenty of low- to no-cost learning options available to people on a daily basis, from books on nearly every academic topic at the local library and on-the-job experience, to the television programming on the National Geographic, History and Discovery channels. If learning can and does take place everywhere, there has to be a specific reason that people would be willing to spend tens of thousands of dollars and several years of their life to get it from one particular source like a college. There is, of course, and again it’s the credential, because no matter how many years I spend diligently tuned to the History Channel, I’m simply not going to get a job as a high-school history teacher with “television watching” as the core of my resume, even if I both learned and retained far more information than I ever could have in a series of college history classes.
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    On why MOOCs are flawed
Ed Webb

Dawn of the cyberstudent | University challenge | guardian.co.uk - 0 views

  • students often have more experience of using new technologies than many university managers — even if they need guidance in using them effectively
    • Ed Webb
       
      And there's the rub. Students can often read, too, in the basic sense. But our job as higher educators is to get them to really read, to read critically and do something with that reading. So, too, with the affordances of web2.0.
  • the research process is likely to become much more open
    • Ed Webb
       
      We can hope
  • a balance that suits them, which may lead to more varying degrees of face-to-face and online contact,
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  • "If you are in Second Life listening to a lecture, your ability to fly through a bush isn't that relevant,
  • All this will put added pressure on university staff, with increasing demands to respond to students 24/7. Read suggests one answer could be for universities in different parts of the world to share the load so that, as often happens already in industry "the work moves around with the sun".
    • Ed Webb
       
      Interesting concept. Dickinson and other internationally-connected institutions would be in good shape to innovate here.
  • learning culture
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    Guardian on how higher ed will have to adapt. Not sure the revolution is here quite yet.
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    "Cyberstudent" is a hideous term.
Bob Rowan

Weblogg-ed - 2 views

  • no better place for my children to watch that speech (or any other, for that matter) than in a place where ideas are encouraged, where critical thinking about those ideas is a natural part of the conversation, and where appropriate response and debate can flourish. Where the adults in the room lead my kids to dig deeper, to validate facts, and consider the many levels of context in which every speech and every debate takes place. Where the discussion around it is such that it lays to rest the concern that many seem to have about this particular speech in general, that in some way the President will be able to “indoctrinate” our kids into some socialist mindset. If schools are the fully functioning learning communities that we hope they are, they should be the place where our kids learn to make sense of ideas, not to fear them. That, however, is not the message we are sending.
    • C Clausen
       
      Isn't it ironic that the very things that we fought for and received via the US Constitution, Civil Rights, etc. are the very things that students are today losing? As an American History teacher I talk about the past, present, and future and show my students how things have/have not changed throughout time. I begin the year by reading the "True Story of the 3 Little Pigs," and talk about J.S. Mill and his challenge to others to question. Is society truly against the educating of its students to have an open-mind, ask questions, and look at many perspectives?
  • In the midst of all of the “uproar” over the President’s planned speech to school kids on Tuesday, I keep thinking about what all of this says about schools, about what they are for, and about the perception that a lot of people in this country have of them.
    • Michelle Ohanian
       
      My English Language Learners were very positive about the speech and couldn't understand all the uproar. Aren't we teaching in government funded schools? Well my young adults liked the message of responsibilty. I have also taught the true story of the 3 little pigs but my ELLs weren/t really familiar with the original version. It helped with point of view from the orignal version.
  • thin walls
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  • thin walls
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    Education Speech
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    Education Speech
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    Will Richardson is Mr. Utopian Education to a lot of people. Even if you don't agree with everything he says, most folks agree that he offers thought-provoking topics.
Ed Webb

Office of Educational Technology (OET) - 63 views

  • Secretary Arne Duncan invites comments on the draft National Educational Technology Plan.
  • This plan is a draft. "We are open to your comments," Secretary Duncan said. "Tell us about how technology has changed your school or classroom." Read the plan. Share your comments, videos and examples of how technology is changing and improving education.
Mark Glynn

ERIC - Enhancing the Impact of Formative Feedback on Student Learning through an Online... - 49 views

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    "Formative feedback is instrumental in the learning experience of a student. It can be effective in promoting learning if it is timely, personal, manageable, motivational, and in direct relation with assessment criteria. Despite its importance, however, research suggests that students are discouraged from engaging in the feedback process primarily for reasons that relate to lack of motivation and difficulty in relating to and reflecting on the feedback comments. In this paper we present Online FEdback System (OFES), an e-learning tool that effectively supports the provision of formative feedback. Our aims are to enhance feedback reception and to strengthen the quality of feedback through the way feedback is communicated to the students. We propose that an effective feedback communication mechanism should be integrated into a student's online learning space and it is anticipated that this provision will motivate students to engage with feedback. Empirical evidence suggests that the developed system successfully addressed the issues of student engagement and motivation and achieved its objectives. The results of using the system for two years indicate a positive perception of the students which, in turn, encourage us to further explore its effectiveness by extending its functionality and integrating it into a an open source learning management system"
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