Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items matching "feedback" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
amberdewire

Educational Leadership:Feedback for Learning:Seven Keys to Effective Feedback - 87 views

  • Whether the feedback was in the observable effects or from other people, in every case the information received was not advice, nor was the performance evaluated. No one told me as a performer what to do differently or how "good" or "bad" my results were. (You might think that the reader of my writing was judging my work, but look at the words used again: She simply played back the effect my writing had on her as a reader.) Nor did any of the three people tell me what to do (which is what many people erroneously think feedback is—advice). Guidance would be premature; I first need to receive feedback on what I did or didn't do that would warrant such advice.
  • Decades of education research support the idea that by teaching less and providing more feedback, we can produce greater learning (see Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, 2000; Hattie, 2008; Marzano, Pickering, & Pollock, 2001).
  • Feedback Essentials
  • ...25 more annotations...
  • Goal-Referenced
  • Tangible and Transparent
  • Actionable
  • User-Friendly
  • Timely
  • Ongoing
  • Consistent
  • Progress Toward a Goal
  • But There's No Time!"
  • remember that feedback does not need to come only from the teacher, or even from people at all. Technology is one powerful tool—part of the power of computer-assisted learning is unlimited, timely feedback and opportunities to use it.
  • learners are often unclear about the specific goal of a task or lesson, so it is crucial to remind them about the goal and the criteria by which they should self-assess
  • I recommend that all teachers videotape their own classes at least once a month. It was a transformative experience for me when I did it as a beginning teacher.
  • research shows that less teaching plus more feedback is the key to achieving greater learning.
  • Even if feedback is specific and accurate in the eyes of experts or bystanders, it is not of much value if the user cannot understand it or is overwhelmed by it.
  • Adjusting our performance depends on not only receiving feedback but also having opportunities to use it.
  • Clearly, performers can only adjust their performance successfully if the information fed back to them is stable, accurate, and trustworthy. In education, that means teachers have to be on the same page about what high-quality work is. Teachers need to look at student work together, becoming more consistent over time and formalizing their judgments in highly descriptive rubrics supported by anchor products and performances.
  • Score student work in the fall and winter against spring standards, use more pre-and post-assessments to measure progress toward these standards, and do the item analysis to note what each student needs to work on for better future performance.
  • Effective supervisors and coaches work hard to carefully observe and comment on what they observed, based on a clear statement of goals. That's why I always ask when visiting a class, "What would you like me to look for and perhaps count?"
  • . Less teaching, more feedback. Less feedback that comes only from you, and more tangible feedback designed into the performance itself.
  • how we are doing in our efforts to reach a goal.
  • get another opportunity to receive and learn from the feedback.
  • computer games
  • quickly adapt
  • ack, do you have some ideas about how to improve?" This approach will build greater autono
  • ck, do you have some ideas about how to improve?" This approach will build greater autono
  •  
    Wiggins Advice, evaluation, grades-none of these provide the descriptive information that students need to reach their goals. What is true feedback-and how can it improve learning? Who would dispute the idea that feedback is a good thing? Both common sense and research make it clear: Formative assessment, consisting of lots of feedback and opportunities to use that feedback, enhances performance and achievement. Yet even John Hattie (2008), whose decades of research revealed that feedback was among the most powerful influences on achievement, acknowledges that he has "struggled to understand the concept" (p. 173). And many writings on the subject don't even attempt to define the term. To improve formative assessment practices among both teachers and assessment designers, we need to look more closely at just what feedback is-and isn't.
  •  
    Effective Feedback - Grant Wiggins
Mark Glynn

ERIC - Enhancing the Impact of Formative Feedback on Student Learning through an Online Feedback System, Electronic Journal of e-Learning, 2010 - 49 views

  •  
    "Formative feedback is instrumental in the learning experience of a student. It can be effective in promoting learning if it is timely, personal, manageable, motivational, and in direct relation with assessment criteria. Despite its importance, however, research suggests that students are discouraged from engaging in the feedback process primarily for reasons that relate to lack of motivation and difficulty in relating to and reflecting on the feedback comments. In this paper we present Online FEdback System (OFES), an e-learning tool that effectively supports the provision of formative feedback. Our aims are to enhance feedback reception and to strengthen the quality of feedback through the way feedback is communicated to the students. We propose that an effective feedback communication mechanism should be integrated into a student's online learning space and it is anticipated that this provision will motivate students to engage with feedback. Empirical evidence suggests that the developed system successfully addressed the issues of student engagement and motivation and achieved its objectives. The results of using the system for two years indicate a positive perception of the students which, in turn, encourage us to further explore its effectiveness by extending its functionality and integrating it into a an open source learning management system"
Florence Dujardin

Developing first-year engagement with written feedback - 37 views

  •  
    Assessment feedback continues to be a relatively under-researched area in higher education despite its fundamental role in learning and teaching. This article positions assessment feedback as a complex meaning-making process requiring dialogue and interpretation.The article outlines an evaluative case study investigating a feedback review meeting organized through the personal tutor system. This meeting is designed to support students' engagement with written feedback at their first formal feedback 'moment' when confidence and self-esteem can be at risk. The evaluation of the review meeting suggests students benefit from one conversation about all their written feedback. The article concludes that developing positive learning relationships with personal tutors at the point of assessment feedback can encourage a sense of achievement and success at a time when learners may feel most vulnerable to low self-esteem. In this way, the intervention can be valuable as part of an institution's retention strategy.
Jess Hazlewood

"Where's the Writer" TETYC March 2014 - 43 views

  • “Responders Are Taught, Not Born”
  • We contend that student writers will see greater value in peer response if they develop tools that allow them to participate more actively in the feedback process. With teaching suggestions like those above, writers can learn how to re-flect on their experiences with peer response. They can also learn to identify their needs as writers and how to ask questions that will solicit the feedback they need.
  • We like to limit each mock session to no more than seven minutes of back and forth between respondent and writer.
  • ...33 more annotations...
  • class suggests that the writer’s question
  • This becomes a teachable moment. When the respondent asks for assistance from the class, this break in the session becomes an opportunity for the class to assist the writer and the respondent. The writer appears stuck, not knowing what to ask. And the respondent appears perplexed, too.
  • we follow Carl Anderson’s suggestion to teach students how to ask questions about their writing through role-playing.
  • dynamic list that students freely update throughout the semester on the class classro
  • organize the questions within categories such as tone, content, evidence-based support, style, and logistics
  • The end result is a robust list of questions for writers to ask of their respondents.
  • in-class discussion about effective and less effective questions for writers
  • raft three to five questions they have about the assignment to ask of their peers as they prepare to write or revise their assignment. When appropriate, we can direct our students to the course text, where there are
  • , “Feedback: What Works for You and How Do You Get It?”
  • Students’ comments often point to their struggle to position themselves in peer response.
  • “What would it take for you to be in-vested as writers in peer response?” Students’ typical responses include the following:>“I need to know what to ask.” >“I don’t know what to ask about my writing, except for things like punctua-tion and grammar.”>“Does the person reading my work really know what the assignment is? Bet-ter than I do?”>“I’m not really sure if I’m supposed to talk or ask questions when someone is giving me feedback about my work, so I don’t really do anything. They write stuff on my paper. Sometimes I read it if I can, but I don’t really know what to do with it.”
  • it is important to offer activities to ensure that both respondents and writers are able to articulate a clear purpose of what they are trying to accomplish. These activities, guided by the pedagogies used to prepare writing center consultants
  • devote more attention to the respondent than to the writer, we may unwit-tingly be encouraging writers to be bystanders, rather than active participants, in the response process.
  • : pointing, summarizing, and reflecting
  • highlight the value of both giving and getting feedback:In 56 pages near the end of this book, we’ve explained all the good methods we know for getting feedback from classmates on your writing. . . . The ability to give responses to your classmates’ writing and to get their responses to your own writing may be the most important thing you learn from this book. (B
  • Peter Elbow and Pat Belanoff ’s first edition of A Community of Writers published in 1995, in which eleven “Sharing and Responding” techniques, d
  • While such questions are helpful to emerging writers, who depend on modeling, they lack explanation about what makes them “helpful” questions. As a result, emerging writers may perceive them as a prescriptive set of questions that must be answered (or worse, a set of questions to be “given over” to a respondent), rather than what they are intended to be: questions that could advance the writer’s thoughts and agenda.
  • this information is limited to the instructor’s manual
  • llustrates the difference be-tween vague and helpful questions, pointing out that helpful questions
  • You will need to train students to ask good questions, which will help reviewers target their attention.Questions like “How can I make this draft better?” “What grade do you think this will get?” and “What did you think?” are not helpful, as they are vague and don’t reflect anything about the writer’s own thoughts. Questions like “Am I getting off topic in the introduction when I talk about walking my sister to the corner on her first day of school?” or “Does my tone on page 3 seem harsh? I’m trying to be fair to the people who disagree with the decision I’m describing” help readers understand the writer’s purpose and will set up good conversations. (Harrington 14, emphasis added
  • uestions” when soliciting feedback (like the advice we found in many textbooks), she also provides explicit examples for doing so
  • he most explicit advice for writers about ask-ing questions and, in effect, setting up good conversations is buried in an instruc-tor’s manual for The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing. In thi
  • “Getting Response” chapter later in the book, they will benefit from the textbook authors’ instructions that they should in fact use questions that will help them solicit their feedback
  • dependent on what parts of the textbook they choose to read
  • point writers to a specific set of questions that they should ask of their respondents. Such instructions take a notable step toward shifting the locus of control from the respondent to helping writers engage their peers in conversation.
  • there is no mention that writers might use them for purposes of soliciting feedback.
  • we see an opportunity for modeling that is not fully realized.
  • we argue that Faigley offers respondents specific examples that empower them to actively engage the process and give feedback. We contend that emergent writers need a similar level of instruction if they are to be agents in response.
  • textbook authors offer few examples for how to get specific feedback
  • we question whether textbooks provide emergent writers with enough tools or explicit models to engage actively in peer response conversations.
  • we worked to understand how textbooks highlight the writer’s role in peer response.
  • We wanted to know what books tell writers about asking questions
  • lthough we do not discount the importance of teaching respondents how to give feedback, we argue that writers must also be taught how to request the feedback they desire.
  •  
    Writer's role in soliciting feedback during peer edit. Suggestions for modeling and training.
Maria Nuzzo

20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback to Your Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning - 215 views

    • Elizabeth Sato
       
      These four questions are AWESOME.  I want to research Dinham 2002 & 2007.  It's true as adults, why don't we give kids the same consideration?
    • Elizabeth Sato
       
      I like the idea of concentrating on one thing -- let the kids know what I'm looking for during the week.  Eg. on the board it could say "conference focus"
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Great for conferring to really help students focus on improving one writing skill
  • Utilize this strategy when grading papers or tests. This strategy allows you the necessary time to provide quality, written feedback.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • Alternate due dates for your students/classes.
  • Educate students on how to give feedback to each other.
  • Model for students what appropriate feedback looks like and sounds like.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Gradual Release of Responsibility: Student learns to do heavy lifting
  • Ask another adult to give feedback.
  • defeated. Here you will find 20 ideas and techniques on how to give effective learning feedback that will leave your students with the feeling they can
  •  
    20 tips for effective feedback -- ESPECIALLY #4 & 9
  •  
    20 tips for effective feedback -- ESPECIALLY #4 & 9
Sharin Tebo

5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback | Edutopia - 85 views

  • providing students with meaningful feedback can greatly enhance learning and improve student achievement.
  • feedback
  • here are five research-based tips for providing students with the kind of feedback that will increase motivation, build on existing knowledge, and help them reflect on what they've learned.
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • feedback is most effective when it is given immediately
  • researchers suggest taking the time to provide learners with information on what exactly they did well, and what may still need improvement. They also note that it can be helpful to tell the learner what he is doing differently than before.
  • Sooner the Better
  • Specific
  • the researchers found that participants who were given immediate feedback showed a significantly larger increase in performance than those who had received delayed feedback.
  • Advancement Toward a Goal
  • it should be clear to students how the information they are receiving will help them progress toward their final goal.
  • Involve Learners in the Process
  • When students have access to this information, they develop an awareness of their learning, and are more easily able to recognize mistakes and eventually develop strategies for tackling weak points themselves.
Florence Dujardin

Embedding academic writing instruction into subject teaching: A case study - 0 views

  •  
    The benefits of embedding the teaching of writing into the curriculum have been advocated by educators and researchers. However, there is currently little evidence of embedded writing instruction in the UK's higher education context. In this article, we present a case study in which we report the design, implementation and evaluation of an academic writing intervention with first-year undergraduate students in an applied linguistics programme. Our objectives were to try a combination of embedded instructional methods and provide an example that can be followed by lecturers across disciplines and institutions. Through the integration of in-class and online writing tasks and assessment feedback in a first-term module, we supported students' writing development throughout the first term. We evaluated the effects of the intervention through the analysis of notes on classroom interaction, a student questionnaire and interviews, and a text analysis of students' writing and the feedback comments over time. The evaluation findings provide insights into the feasibility and effectiveness of this approach. The embedded writing instruction was perceived as useful by both students and teachers. The assessment feedback, whilst being the most work-intensive method for the teachers, was valued most by the students and led to substantial improvements in the writing of some. These findings suggest that embedded writing instruction could be usefully applied in other higher education contexts.
Alanna King

Teacher feedback with Diigo - YouTube - 194 views

    • Alanna King
       
      I can't wait to try this with an online assignment. As a teacher-librarian, I may have to convince a teacher to try it so that I can actually see it in action.  I believe Diigo is really going to help my students and staff go paperless.
  • dent feedback to online work, and supports student responses and comments to each other. Category: Education Tags: diigo groups feedback collaboration teacher License: Standard YouTube License
  •  
    Using Diigo to provide feedback to student online work
Martin Burrett

Vocal Recall - 31 views

  •  
    "An amazing feedback app. Create QR codes and attach audio feedback for students/parents to listen to. QR codes are emailed to you after requesting them from the app. Glue into books to evidence your feedback. Get your students to reply to begin a conversation about their work."
Nina Levine

How to Give Your Students Better Feedback in Less Time - 127 views

  •  
    Feedback is essential to students' success. By creating a well organized collection of comments/suggestions designed to provide meaningful Feedback, and making those comments easily accessible, we can efficiently increase our effectiveness with students.
Michèle Drechsler

Socialbookmarking with Diigo and Education. A survey that could interest you. - 77 views

Please note that this survey is usually taken in 20 minutes, but you can save your partial answers with the "Resume later" button: this would ask you a login and password to save your answers. Then...

socialbookmarking Diigo survey research

Aly Kenee

Days Like This… | alytapp - 132 views

  • Instead of scribbling marks in the margins of printed papers, I opened each student’s paper in Google Docs, highlighted text and inserted comments to clarify my thoughts, and then turned on the screen recorder (Jing) to record my voice as I scrolled through the paper and pointed to items with my mouse. Right after recording, I uploaded the finished recording to Jing’s companion hosting site, and then I simply copied and pasted the link to the recording directly into the Google Doc.
    • brianhammel
       
      Adding value in context rather than providing repetitive written comments in the summation.
  • After about four minutes, they began the next task, copying and pasting my reflection questions into the bottom of their docs, and then responding to those prompts as they reflected on their work and my feedback.
  • As I watched them, I couldn’t help but remember the way that I used to provide feedback. Students would receive their graded papers, flip past the comments I had scribbled in the margin, glance at the final grade, and then forget all about it.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • I always knew there was more I wanted to convey to them about their writing, about how they had or had not created meaning for the reader.
  • It took me about 10 minutes per paper, times 68 papers, so the last week and a half have been intense. If you’re doing the math, that’s over 11 hours of paper grading. If I am going to put in that kind of time for grading, I must see my students growing as writers. Period.
    • brianhammel
       
      Technology tool is NOT a time saver. The main goal for using the tool is not increased productivity by the teacher, but instead increased understanding by the student.
    • Aly Kenee
       
      Yes! You state that so eloquently. We often think of tech as nothing more than a tool for expediency.
  •  I liked knowing that my essay got individual attention, individual feedback, and I feel like you cared about what I wrote.
  • A small number of students (actually, fewer than 5) said that they didn’t feel that the verbal comments were all that helpful.
  • hurtful to hear me say out loud what was wrong with their papers
  • Writing is personal, and feedback can feel like an attack.
    • brianhammel
       
      On the flipside, writing is personal, and receiving impersonal and confusing written feedback can also be hurtful. The student spends so much time writing the assignment, but only receives a small amount of scribbled comments in the margin.
  • tried out a new way of assessing student work — screencasting
Glenda Baker

The Power of Feedback - 153 views

  •  
    Power of positive feedback as an instructional strategy. 
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    Inaccessible
  •  
    This is probably a good article, but it can't be accessed without paying a $25 fee.
  •  
    I write extensively about narrative feedback in my forthcoming book, ROLE Reversal (ASCD 2013). I quote Hattie and Timperly several times on the subject. Dylan Wiliam is another expert who has researched feedback for decades.
Sharin Tebo

The Importance of Low-Stakes Student Feedback | ASSESSMENT | MindShift | KQED News - 62 views

  • culture of learning” instead of a “culture of earning.”
  • Creating that kind of culture isn’t easy, but Bull continually goes back to formative assessment as the key.
  • “I find that formative assessment tends to be the most important aspect of a learning assessment plan,” he said. “It has the most impact on a student’s learning.”
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • grade-less report card, where words like “outstanding” or “needs improvement” are used in place of letter or number grades.
  • digital or paper portfolios that display a collection of student work. “It’s a very reflective process,” said Bull. It works best if students analyze their own body of work
  •  
    Low-Stakes Student Feedback & Assessment
Sharin Tebo

Share "Feedforward," Not Feedback | Edutopia - 51 views

  • Feedback, by its very definition, is focused on the past, which can't be changed. Feedforward looks ahead at future possibilities that still fall under our control. Feedback tends to reinforce personal stereotypes or negative self-fulfilling prophecies. Feedforward looks beyond what is in favor of what can be.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      What do we think of this concept? Feedforward is a new word and a new idea for me. Others' thoughts?
  • With feedforward, those ideas come from the very person being asked to change, increasing the odds that change will occur.
  • job-embedded PD
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Job-embedded PD--that is new to me, but it makes sense!
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Change belongs in the hands of the teacher.
  • Deployed by districts or contracted by individual schools, instructional coaches live alongside the faculty and provide on-the-job support to teams of teachers.
  • Peer Observations and Teacher Rounds
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      This is happening in some sites I support in my District. I am hoping to bring that to life even more to improve vertical alignment and strengthen the horizontal alignment in course-alikes. 
  • PLCs bring together teachers with shared interests and goals for frequent discussion about and analysis of teaching practices.
Marsha Ratzel

letsgetengaged - Empowering Students Through Reflection and Feedback - 118 views

  •  
    Lots of tools in active listening, reflection, self evaluations, feedback...with ideas to use with students.
Rachel Hinton

What Kind of Feedback Helps Students Who Are Doing Poorly? - 91 views

  •  
    "Students perform poorly in our courses for a variety of reasons. Here are some students you've likely encountered over the years, as well as a few ideas on the type of feedback that best helps them turn things around. "
Randolph Hollingsworth

What does 'feedback' mean in higher education? | STEM Blog - 2 views

  •  
    includes an interactive card sort task that can be used by faculty (among and across departments) to structure discussions around the different types and sources of feedback to students.
Martin Burrett

Whole Class Feedback Template by @JNewsumEnglish - 55 views

  •  
    "Feedback template with sections for SPaG errors, presentation, next steps, targets and more."
Martin Burrett

Giving Feedback Shouldn't be Boring - And it doesn't have to be by @Hubert_AI - 34 views

  •  
    "Anyone who's actively been trying to collect feedback on something knows what a struggle it is. You put down the work, figure out questions, deciding appropriate scales, thinking through how to phrase the questions, rephrase them 3 times more, and then, finally, input everything into your favourite survey tool and press send."
1 - 20 of 276 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page