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Lauren Rosen

Flip This: Bloom's Taxonomy Should Start with Creating | MindShift - 7 views

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    Flipping Blooms Taxonomy. Great article. Every time we ask students to use a new structure to talk about themselves and then let them figure out why the sentence order is what it is, we arepracticing this. We see greater results as they move to higher levels of production making more errors but experimenting and learning from their mistakes in production.
Allison Hart

My Fake Wall - MyFakeWall.com - 122 views

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    Create a Fake Facebook Wall and use it to create a biography, historical fiction, or an autobiography. Students can be very creative.
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    Anyone else having trouble uploading images to new Walls?? We could last week, but today get an HTML error... Anyone else?
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    I have. I had to enter compatibility mode in Internet Explorer. There is a button next to the address bar that you click on. It looks like a broken page. Here is a screen shot. That seemed to do it. http://screencast.com/t/OtIYLvy40
anonymous

For Stanford U. MOOC instructors, trial and error breeds success | Inside Higher Ed - 1 views

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    Finally seeing results with their MOOCS...
Stephanie Holt

11 surprising language "errors" that have become common usage - 67 views

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    Straightforward blog post listing 11 words once denounced or disputed. Objections are not disccussed, but come from a fascinating range of sources, and on varying grounds. Stretches from the sixteenth century to more recent coinages (TS Eliot on "television).
Martin Burrett

Whole Class Feedback Template by @JNewsumEnglish - 55 views

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    "Feedback template with sections for SPaG errors, presentation, next steps, targets and more."
Brian Taylor

A Teacher's Top 3 Must Haves | @LeadingLearner - 54 views

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    Being able to construct a learning progression from simple facts to important concepts or simplex skills to complex ones is our daily bread and butter.  The ability to do this really well sets some teachers apart.  It helps create a focus on learning within the classroom rather than just being busy.  Whilst the sequencing of knowledge is a crucial starting point the real star teachers also know the points at which key misunderstandings or mistakes are often made by pupils.  In the classroom they are already alert to these possible errors and can intervene quickly and incisively.  Teachers spending time planning together must focus on the learning progressions or journeys, if you prefer.  A critical element of this planning is the determining of excellence; what standard should these pupils be able to reach.  My suggestion would be start with the end in mind; what kep concept or complex skill are you trying to teach.
Chema Falcó

Failure doesn't automatically lead to succes - 13 views

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    Cómo debemos gestionar los errores para aprender de ellos
Marsha Ratzel

Blogging Begins « What Else? 1DR - 33 views

    • Marsha Ratzel
       
      This is where I see the power really get amped up
  • As we passed the work along, student comments became longer and better as they read other comments that were better than some who had not followed our protocol and simply wrote, “I agree.”  By the time every one had commented on every one else’s card, all students had written at least one good comment.
  • While reading about Martin Luther King, Jr, students chose a quote from his work. Students wrote the quote on an index card and explained why they chose the quote or what they thought about the quote.  Then we passed the card to the student on the left, and that student read the card and added a sticky note comment. The note needed to be at least three sentences, refer or quote something from the original text, and be “overly positive.” We handed the card and comment to the left again, and that student read the comment and the card. We continued passing to the left and adding sticky note comments, which could comment on the original text or any of the comments.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • When the original writer received the card, they chose and shared the comments that helped them think more or caused them to want to add to their original ideas.
  • new site called Tween Tribune (http://tweentribune.com/), a site for students and teachers with kid-friendly news feeds on which to comment or add their own stories.  We read comments and critiqued them, noticing some grammatical errors and mostly that some comments did not add to the conversation.
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    Great lesson idea for how to get started in classroom blogging.
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    One of the easiest ways I've seen to get started on blogging and commenting.
Bob Kachurek

Canvas for OneNote - 45 views

  • Canvas for OneNote allows you to navigate and edit notebooks in a new way by providing a high-level canvas-view of all your content. The prototype lets you zoom and pan around; view and organize content in new ways; add new pages right where you want them; and even locate pages in a timeline view.
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    Allows you to view all pages in a notebook as though they are laid out on a table top. You can zoom in and out and edit.
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    I found that none of the three links to the videos on the home page worked. Still, I downloaded and installed, but could not open any of my Notebooks, getting the same extensive error message as others have posted. Seems to me this is a long, long way from being ready for prime time.
Dave Ball

Send bookmark to Class Group - 58 views

Works good enough: If you "share to group" a cached bookmark, you have to wait for a long time and get an error message. But the bookmark will be put into the group, but *unshared*. I don't know ...

diigo sendTo classGroup

Melissa Enderle

Image Forensics : Error Level Analysis - 90 views

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    Submit the URL of a JPEG image to this site and it instantly highlights possible alterations, helping determining authenticity of an image. Great tool for teaching about internet evaluation.
Clint Hamada

FAQ For Librarians - Outreach Wiki - 51 views

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    How common are mistakes on Wikipedia? Because Wikipedia is editable by anyone we can't guarantee you won't stumble across a mistake. But mistakes are fairly rare. External studies have suggested they occur at about the same rate they do in traditional encyclopedias. One thing that is great about Wikipedia is that it allows anyone to correct a mistake. A printed encyclopedia will need to wait for its next edition for a mistake to be fixed. On Wikipedia a mistake can be, and often is, fixed instantly.
Ed Webb

BBC NEWS | Europe | Swedes miss Capri after GPS gaffe - 0 views

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    A great example of over-reliance on technology and under-reliance on critical thought.
davidsanz50

"Tú verás". Web de Tecnología Eléctrica. - 10 views

  • Einstein : Quien nunca ha cometido un error nunca ha probado algo nuevo.
Jonathan Wylie

Learn How To Take a Screenshot On a Mac: Tips & Tricks - 79 views

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    This guide will walk you through all the steps you need in how to take a screenshot on a Mac with keyboard shortcuts, the Grab utility and 3rd party software options.
Maureen Greenbaum

Optimism Bias: Human Brain May Be Hardwired for Hope -- Printout -- TIME - 62 views

  • manipulated positive and negative expectations of students while their brains were scanned and tested their performance on cognitive tasks. To induce expectations of success, she primed college students with words such as smart, intelligent and clever just before asking them to perform a test. To induce expectations of failure, she primed them with words like stupid and ignorant. The students performed better after being primed with an affirmative message. Examining the brain-imaging data, Bengtsson found that the students' brains responded differently to the mistakes they made depending on whether they were primed with the word clever or the word stupid. When the mistake followed positive words, she observed enhanced activity in the anterior medial part of the prefrontal cortex (a region that is involved in self-reflection and recollection). However, when the participants were primed with the word stupid, there was no heightened activity after a wrong answer. It appears that after being primed with the word stupid, the brain expected to do poorly and did not show signs of surprise or conflict when it made an error
Todd Campion

Great Expectations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

  • Miss Havisham and her family Miss Havisham, wealthy spinster who takes Pip on as a companion and whom Pip suspects is his benefactor. Miss Havisham does not discourage this as it fits into her own spiteful plans. She later apologizes to him as she's overtaken by guilt. He accepts her apology and she is badly burnt when her dress catches aflame from a spark which leapt from the fire. Pip saves her, but she later dies from her injuries. Estella (Havisham), Miss Havisham's adopted daughter, whom Pip pursues romantically throughout the novel. She is secretly the daughter of Molly, Jaggers' housekeeper, and Abel Magwitch, Pip's convict, but was given up to Miss Havisham after a murder trial. Estella represents the life of wealth and culture for which Pip strives. Since her ability to love has been ruined by Miss Havisham, she is unable to return Pip's passion. She warns Pip of this repeatedly, but he is unwilling or unable to believe her. At one point, Estella is walking up some iron stairs representing how she is of a higher class than Pip when in fact she is of the same class. Arthur (Havisham), Miss Havisham's half-brother, who felt he was shortchanged in his inheritance by their father's preference for his daughter. He joined with Compeyson in the scheme to cheat Miss Havisham of large sums of money by gaining Miss Havisham's trust through promise of marriage to Compeyson. Arthur is haunted by the memory of the scheme and sickens and dies in a delirium, imagining that the still-living Miss Havisham is in his room, coming to kill him. Arthur has died before the beginning of the novel and gambled heavily, being drunk quite often. Matthew Pocket, a cousin of Miss Havisham's. He is the patriarch of the Pocket family, but unlike others of her relatives he is not greedy for Havisham's wealth. Matthew Pocket has a family of nine children, two nurses, a housekeeper, a cook, and a pretty but useless wife (named Belinda). He also tutors young gentlemen, such as Bentley Drummle, Startop, Pip, and his own son Herbert, who live on his estate. Herbert Pocket, a member of the Pocket family, Miss Havisham's presumed heirs, whom Pip first meets as a "pale young gentleman" who challenges Pip to a fist fight at Miss Havisham's house when both are children. He is the son of Matthew Pocket, Pip's tutor in the "gentlemanly" arts, and shares his apartment with Pip in London, becoming Pip's fast friend who is there to share Pip's happiness as well as his troubles. He is in love with a girl called Clara. Herbert keeps it secret because he knows his mother would say she is below his "station". Camilla, an ageing, talkative relative of Miss Havisham who does not care much for Miss Havisham and only wants her money. She is one of the many relatives who hang around Miss Havisham "like flies" for her wealth. Cousin Raymond, another ageing relative of Miss Havisham who is only interested in her money. He is married to Camilla. Georgiana, an ageing relative of Miss Havisham who is only interested in her money. Sarah Pocket, "a dry, brown corrugated old woman, with a small face that might have been made out of walnut shells, and a large mouth like a cat's without the whiskers." Another ageing relative of Miss Havisham who is only interested in her money
  • Characters from Pip's youth The Convict, an escapee from a prison ship, whom Pip treats kindly, and who turns out to be his benefactor, at which time his real name is revealed to be Abel Magwitch, but who is also known as Provis and Mr. Campbell in parts of the story to protect his identity. Pip also covers him as his uncle in order that no one recognizes him as a convict sent to Australia years before. Abel Magwitch, the convict's given name, who is also Pip's benefactor. Provis, a name that Abel Magwitch uses when he returns to London, to conceal his identity. Pip also says that "Provis" is his uncle visiting from out of town. Mr. Campbell, a name that Abel Magwitch uses after he is discovered in London by his enemy. Mr. and Mrs. Hubble, simple folk who think they are more important than they really are. They live in Pip's village. Mr. Wopsle, the clerk of the church in Pip's village. He later gives up the church work and moves to London to pursue his ambition to be an actor, even though he is not very good. Mr. Waldengarver, the stage name that Mr. Wopsle adopts as an actor in London. Biddy, Mr. Wopsle's second cousin; she runs an evening school from her home in Pip's village and becomes Pip's teacher. A kind and intelligent but poor young woman, she is, like Pip and Estella, an orphan. She is the opposite of Estella. Pip ignores her obvious love for him as he fruitlessly pursues Estella. After he realizes the error of his life choices, he returns to claim Biddy as his bride, only to find out she has married Joe Gargery. Biddy and Joe later have two children, one named after Pip whom Estella mistakes as Pip's child in the original ending. Orlick was attracted to her, but his affection was unreciprocated
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