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Steve Ransom

Peter T. Coleman, PhD: The Consequences of Our Games - 2 views

  • "At a time when games are becoming ever more realistic, reality is becoming more gamelike."
  • The problem is not that games are inconsistent with many aspects of our lives; it is that they provide a limited and skewed lens on the world
  • Seeing more and more aspects of our lives as games to win through maximization has a sort of self-perpetuating effect with perverse consequences, not the least of which is the impairment of what Diesing terms social rationality; the cherishing of unique relationships, personal connectedness, cooperative functioning, solidarity and sentiment.
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  • It stresses the strategic interdependent interests of humans and assumes that in games there is always a rational choice which is the best counter-choice to your opponent's.
  • If winning efficiently is the goal, then the rules (ethical, moral, legal, and spiritual), are essentially obstacles to game.
  • In our schools, competition for access to elite preschools, for grades, for social status, in sports, over positions of leadership, and for admission to exclusive colleges transforms one of our most basic institutions for fostering community, ethics and learning into competitive, individualistic corporate training-grounds. In these settings, the importance of competitive sports becomes paramount, for both financial and training purposes, and the artistry of cheating (see this year's Stuyvesant High School cheating scandal) and rule-bending (see Joe Paterno) revered. Such intense competition encourages the professionalization of parenting -- through tutors, highly-educated nannies, prep courses, and professional training camps (such as investment camps). You can imagine the deleterious effects these trends have on the ethos of care and moral responsibility in our families and schools, a critical buffer against bullying and violence in the lives of our children.
  • We become hyper-connected through technologies, boasting our number of "friends" on Facebook, and have less and less intimacy.
  • We choose friends with benefits or Internet porn over romantic relationships as they are less messy, more efficient.
  • Life is a race and we are losing.
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    A great piece worth the time to reflect on. Mindfulness needs to be practiced frequently.
Steve Ransom

As Facebook Aims at Millions of Users, Some Are Content to Sit Out - NYTimes.com - 18 views

  • What does matter, he said, is Facebook’s ability to keep its millions of current users entertained and coming back.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Exactly what Huxley was warning us of...
    • Steve Ransom
  • “They’re likely more worried about the novelty factor wearing off,” Mr. Valdes said. “That’s a continual problem that they’re solving
Steve Ransom

Should Professors Allow Students to Use Computer Devices in the Classroom? | HASTAC - 25 views

  • One final comment, a funny one.  On Monday, in my "Twenty-First Century Literacies" class where laptops are required for a whole range of experiments and inclass collaborative work, I caught one of my students with his laptop open and with a book propped secretly inside it, reading away in his book when he should have been paying attention.   So maybe that's the next class, "Should Professors Allow Students to Use BOOKS in the Classroom Devised for Computer Learning?"   I'm being facetious but that's the point.  A book is a technology too.   How and when we use any technology and for what purpose are the questions we all need to ask.
  • Do you see the difference?   "Computer learning" doesn't exist.   In 2011, it exists less than it did a decade ago and, in a few years, that phrase won't exist at all.   Students learn.  Computers are tools for all kinds of things, from checking the Facebook page, to making notetaking easier, to being fact checking or calculating devices that can take a class to a more sophisticated level to interactive social networking devices that can either distract a class or allow for new forms of group collaboration.   There are many other uses as well.   The point is that most profs have (a) simply "adapted" (as a colleague told me recently) to computers without understanding the intellectual and pedagogical changes they can enable; or (b) resigned themselves to their present, gleefully or resentflly; or (c) made them into a pedagogical tool; or (d) all of the above.    
  • The point isn't that the class has to be designed for "computer learning" but that there are different forms of learning available with a device and profs should be allowed to determine if they want to facilitate and make use of those different forms of learning or not.
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    Great post by Cathy Davidson. Her final facetious question of we will ban books because they can distract students makes a nice point.
Steve Ransom

Anti-Social - Mac/OS X Social Networking Block Software - 8 views

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    Anti-Social is a neat little productivity application for Macs that turns off the social parts of the internet. When Anti-Social is running, you're locked away from hundreds of distracting social media sites, including Facebook, Twitter and other sites you specify. With Anti-Social, you'll be amazed how much work you get done when you turn off your friends.
Sue Beach

ViewPure - 55 views

shared by Sue Beach on 17 Jul 10 - Cached
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    For YouTube Videos: You can set the start time, customize the URL, and even password protect your link.
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    Purify YouTube videos of comments, questions, or other vidual distractions.
Steve Ransom

Why I Returned My iPad - Peter Bregman - Harvard Business Review - 79 views

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    An important read in this age of hyperconnectivity and ubiquitous access to consuming and producing opportunity. Read it.
Steve Ransom

5 Ways to Conquer the Culture of Reaction : Managing :: American Express OPEN Forum - 14 views

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    Great tips! Easy to follow
Steve Ransom

When Kids Say No to Facebook - 41 views

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    Great Post by Angela Stockman on what some of the students she spends time with think about Facebook.
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