Skip to main content

Home/ Classroom 2.0/ Group items tagged change

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Nigel Coutts

Why we fear data and how our perception can change. - The Learner's Way - 1 views

  •  
    Data occupies a somewhat curious place within education. Mention it to teachers and you tend to get one of two responses. One group will roll their eyes and with great sarcasm how data is "so exciting". The other group responds with something akin to "actually I quite like data" indicating that experience has shown them that they are members of a small group. The question is why do some people find data to be a useful and fascinating tool while others see it as a good method for inducing sleep? 
Nigel Coutts

The Trouble with Change Management in Schools - The Learner's Way - 4 views

  •  
    Taken simplistically there could be a feeling that due to the complexity of large systems change becomes an uncontrollable beast with a mind of its own. 
Nigel Coutts

A stable foundation makes change possible - The Learner's Way - 2 views

  •  
    The foundational stability of schools might be our greatest strength.Getting the fundamentals right and protecting them during change efforts is essential. 
Nigel Coutts

Overwhelmed by the constant pace of change - The Learner's Way - 3 views

  •  
    Teaching is undoubtedly a busy profession and one where the end of the to do list seems to be forever located in a galaxy far far away. There is always more to be done and as each item on the list is ticked off, three, four or more seem to have appeared. If we ever do get close to the end, we find ourselves reflecting on what we have achieved and the many ways in which it might be improved. 
Nigel Coutts

Change and why we all see it differently - The Learner's Way - 3 views

  •  
     If the young people of today are to thrive beyond the walls of the classroom they will need to be able to cope with a world characterised by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. The children of todays Kindergarten will enter the workplace in the fourth-decade of the 21st Century. We debate the merits of teaching 21st Century Skills and what they might be while teaching children who have lived their entire lives in that very century. The challenge is how will schools and individual teachers respond to this drive for urgent change.
Nigel Coutts

Culture, Change and the Individual - The Learner's Way - 0 views

  •  
    A recent post by George Couros (author of The innovators Mindset) posed an interesting question about the role that culture plays in shaping the trajectory of an organisation. The traditional wisdom is that culture trumps all but George points to the role that individuals play in shaping and changing culture itself. Is culture perhaps less resilient than we are led to imagine and is it just a consequence of the individuals with the greatest influence? Or, is something else at play here?
Nigel Coutts

What truly drives change in Education? - The Learner's Way - 7 views

  •  
    You do not need to look very hard to find a report claiming that schools and education needs to change. But real change needs more than teacher blaming and increased accountability. What will drive real change is . . .
Nigel Coutts

Why such a rapid pace of change? - The Learner's Way - 7 views

  •  
    I am currently reading "Thank you for being late: An optimist's guide to thriving in the age of accelerations" and have found in this the answer to these questions. In essence we are confronting two types of change, one that we have always faced and one that is unique to our current times. 
Nigel Coutts

The BIG Three for Managing Change - The Learner's Way - 6 views

  •  
    Understanding responses to change is critical and with the predicted future of education increasingly being linked to innovative practices which prepare students for an unknown future change is a central theme
Nigel Coutts

Embracing the complexity of change - The Learner's Way - 10 views

  •  
    The potential for reliably predicting the outcome of any change effort is surely difficult if not even impossible once the number of influences becomes large. Acknowledging the complexity that exists and seeing the potential for growth, creativity and innovation that can exist within an organisation at 'the edge of chaos' are useful strategies as schools face a period of unprecedented change. 
Nigel Coutts

Change, culture and Cultural Change in Education - The Learner's Way - 6 views

  •  
     Embedded in the very weave of the organisation, culture is the most difficult aspect of an organisation to change and the hardest form of change to sustain 'That's because transforming a culture requires influencing people's deepest beliefs and most habitual behaviours' (Rogers, Meehan & Tanne 2006 p5). Rogers et al indicate that as little as 10% of all organisations that set out to develop a high performing culture achieve their goal.
  •  
    Agreed. Education is controlled by the academics since it became a savior for leaving the middle class. Our best civic leaders have a different idea. http://www.textbooksfree.org/Leaders%20Educational%20Advise.htm
Nigel Coutts

Valuing and responding to resistance to change - The Learner's Way - 8 views

  •  
    Change is something that we fear or embrace. It is widely considered as the one constant in our lives. For education at present we face a deluge of reports that the pace of change shall only accelerate and its scale become more absolute. No wonder then that many teachers feel now is a good time for a move out of the profession. For others the changing face of education is seen as bringing exciting new possibilities wrapped in engaging challenges. Regardless of how reliable predictions for change may prove to be it is worth considering how individuals and groups respond to it.
Steve Ransom

Peter T. Coleman, PhD: The Consequences of Our Games - 2 views

  • "At a time when games are becoming ever more realistic, reality is becoming more gamelike."
  • The problem is not that games are inconsistent with many aspects of our lives; it is that they provide a limited and skewed lens on the world
  • Seeing more and more aspects of our lives as games to win through maximization has a sort of self-perpetuating effect with perverse consequences, not the least of which is the impairment of what Diesing terms social rationality; the cherishing of unique relationships, personal connectedness, cooperative functioning, solidarity and sentiment.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • It stresses the strategic interdependent interests of humans and assumes that in games there is always a rational choice which is the best counter-choice to your opponent's.
  • If winning efficiently is the goal, then the rules (ethical, moral, legal, and spiritual), are essentially obstacles to game.
  • In our schools, competition for access to elite preschools, for grades, for social status, in sports, over positions of leadership, and for admission to exclusive colleges transforms one of our most basic institutions for fostering community, ethics and learning into competitive, individualistic corporate training-grounds. In these settings, the importance of competitive sports becomes paramount, for both financial and training purposes, and the artistry of cheating (see this year's Stuyvesant High School cheating scandal) and rule-bending (see Joe Paterno) revered. Such intense competition encourages the professionalization of parenting -- through tutors, highly-educated nannies, prep courses, and professional training camps (such as investment camps). You can imagine the deleterious effects these trends have on the ethos of care and moral responsibility in our families and schools, a critical buffer against bullying and violence in the lives of our children.
  • We become hyper-connected through technologies, boasting our number of "friends" on Facebook, and have less and less intimacy.
  • We choose friends with benefits or Internet porn over romantic relationships as they are less messy, more efficient.
  • Life is a race and we are losing.
  •  
    A great piece worth the time to reflect on. Mindfulness needs to be practiced frequently.
Phil Taylor

The Google Glass feature no one is talking about - Creative Good - 55 views

  • Google Glass experience is not the user experience – it’s the experience of everyone else. The experience of being a citizen, in public, is about to change.
Steve Ransom

If You Build It, They Will Come - 56 views

  •  
    If You Build It, They Will Come -Great post by Ryan Bretag, @ryanbretag
Steve Ransom

The Relationship Status of Teachers and Educational Technology: It's Complicated - Rick... - 58 views

  •  
    The teacher perspective. It's not always because they hate to learn, hate technology, and love worksheets.
1 - 20 of 57 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page