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nthabik

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. - 2 views

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    The Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, adopted by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) in 2000, have become an essential document related to the emergence of information literacy as a recognized learning outcome at many institutions of higher education
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    As one of the academic libraries in the Philippines, we are also using the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education as bases for our Information Literacy program though its more than a decade. We recognize its competencies for outcomes based education.
ilanab

Libraries test a model for setting monographs free - University World News - 1 views

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    Librarians love to get free books into the hands of scholars and students who need them. Publishers love it when their books find readers - but they also need to cover the costs of turning an idea into a finished monograph.
liyanl

Libraries and Open Access - 3 views

Thank you for the information on this :)

open access Module11 libraries non-profit knowledge

Jannicke Røgler

http://www.research4life.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Unsung-heroes-v11.1-webversion.pdf - 3 views

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    It's unquestionable that Research4Life has had a significant impact in improving access to research information for communities in developing countries. I do have a number of criticisms about how the program is organized and delivered, however. 1. Publisher participation in the program is 'entirely voluntary', without 'a single contract (being) signed between any of the partners' (Aaronson, 2004), meaning that publishers can opt out at any point. This issue was highlighted in 2011 when Elsevier, Lipincott Williams & Wilkins, Springer and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, publisher of Science Magazine) withdrew access to over 2500 journals through the HINARI system. Following international attention, and widespread condemnation, publishers restored access, with Elsevier announcing that they were in discussions with the government in Bangladesh to transition towards a paid licensing scheme (Wise, 2011). 2. Countries that meet the eligibility criteria of the program (which are based on the World Bank's listing of Lower and Lower Middle Income Countries) are sometimes excluded. Take for example India or Pakistan- although these countries are in the lists of eligible countries, the publishers deliberately exclude participation to protect whatever business they may have in these countries. So although hundreds of institutions could benefit, they exclude access to protect the business they receive from a handful of institutions. 3. Access to content is delivered through a single username and password for each institution. This is problematic for librarians, as they are unable to ensure the security of the password (a well-meaning researcher may share the password with a colleague in another institution, violating the license agreement). Abuse of institutional accounts has severe consequences, and librarians are sent messages from Research4Life threatening to not only cut off the institution, but all institutions in their country if they
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    Research4life is a great program by committed government and non-government organizations dedicated to produce valuable researches that will improve the life of people. Librarians play an important role in assisting researchers find valid, current, relevant information in order to produce a reliable output or results that will help humankind's betterment of living.
rebeccakah

Project MUSE - Helping People to Manage and Share Their Digital Information: A Role for... - 1 views

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    This article is an interesting take on how public libraries can participate in empowering patrons to develop a personal information management strategy. This can in turn strengthen a sense of community in the digital realm and support the development of community repositories.
victorialam

Espresso Book Machines: Should Libraries Offer On Demand Publishing? - 1 views

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    Espresso Book Machines are a really interesting idea, and despite the "hefty price tag" might be a great solution to users who still prefer print copies to electronic copies of books. It's also interesting to think about how Espresso Machines will influence library collections. This article argues that it supports a patron acquisition model, if all users end up printing books on demand (which will limit questioning during the collection development process) will that mean that for those who can't afford to print books, will not have access to them? Will the Espresso Machine bring the concept of the library and the concept of the bookstore too close together? Don't get me wrong, I think it's a great idea, and the possibilities for self-publishing are great! As these machines gain more popularity, it will be interesting to see the direction of collection development in Libraries.
Kaitie Warren

Open Access and Libraries | American Libraries Live - 0 views

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    Here's a free webinar on Thursday, Nov. 6 at 11am PST. You can register here or go to this site on that day and see it live! Open Access and Libraries: What open access is (and isn't) "Scholarly journals are increasingly becoming digital, experimenting with new publishing models such as Open Access (OA) and incorporating multimedia into their formats. In addition, the process of research continues to evolve because of mandates from funding agencies to publicly share research findings and data. For a candid discussion of what OA is (and isn't), tune in Thursday, November 6 at 2:00 p.m. (Eastern) for the next free, streaming video broadcast of American Libraries Live. Our panel of experts will give their unique perspective on what OA means now and how it will shape the future and will answer your questions."
mbittman

The Social Library: How Public Libraries Are Using Social Media - 3 views

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    Like many of you, I'm connected to the Internet virtually every waking hour of my day - via computer, tablet and mobile phone. Yet I still regularly visit my local public library, in order to borrow books, CDs and DVDs. Which made me wonder: are these two worlds disconnected, or is the Social Web being integrated into our public libraries? In…
aleksandraxhamo

open access and libraries - YouTube - 1 views

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    "Heather Joseph, Executive Directory, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, talks to the University of Maryland community about the evolution of open access and how trendlines are pointing up. Change is accelerating in the push to make information openly and freely available."
Jannicke Røgler

Bibliotekens webbtv & -radio - Kirjastokaista - 2 views

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    Library channel - The libraries webtv & radio. A service from the National Library of Finland.
embioptera

Open access: implications for scholarly publishing and medical libraries - 11 views

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    This article does a nice job of approaching the subject of the history of open access scholarly publishing from the library perspective. It also lays out some of the views of stakeholders (publishers, researchers, institutions, librarians, and consumer groups) in a nice, easy to digest way. The article is brief, so they probably don't hit all the issues, but I found it a helpful and interesting introduction.
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    One way of understanding the open access, knowledge, and source.
Raúl Marcó del Pont

Report /Overview to Ebook Preservation - 1 views

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    The report was released as part of the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) Technology Watch series. Title Preserving eBooks (DPC Technology Watch Report 14-01; June 2014) Authors Sheila Morrissey Ithaka S+R Source Digital Preservation Coalition Abstract This report discusses current developments and issues with which public, national, and higher education libraries, publishers, aggregators, and preservation institutions must contend to ensure long-term access to eBook content.
Philip Sidaway

The Other End of the Scale: Rethinking the Digital Experience in Higher Education - 2 views

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    It is time to rethink the digital experience in higher education: we have a chance not only to reimagine our encounters with the large scale but also to embrace our opportunities at the other end of the scale. William G.
nwhysel

open-glam Discussion List - 1 views

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    open-glam is a discussion list of the Open Knowledge Forum for those interested inbopen data and open content in the cultural heritage field.
Jannicke Røgler

Norway Is Digitizing All Its Books - 3 views

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    "In a plan to scan all of its publications to the cloud, the National Library of Norway is digitalizing its books, and it and plans to make them all freely available to users with a Norwegian IP address. The library plans to have the project completed in about 15 to 20 years."
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    This is such a great initiative! And it falls under common sense, why would the documents obtained by legal deposit not be available for all the population of a country? Seeing my own country, Canada, reducing the acquisitions under legal deposit while others makes it more visible and accessible makes me want to weep.
Penelope Hamblin

Cool connected learning project at Chattanooga Public Library - 2 views

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    Chattanooga (no, I don't work or live there) is building the infrastructure for connected learning for all citizens. Gigabit broadband. Public library spaces where learners and entrepreneurs can play with all kinds of tools, not just tech ones. Make.Play.Read.Learn is a summer program offered by the library and the local Mozilla Hive Learning Community. I love the statement, "If you are reading this, you are already participating."
Philip Sidaway

"The Library of the 21st century, through its online repository, is transforming the ro... - 9 views

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    This is a weekly series highlighting Open Access Button users from around the world, discussing their work, and sharing their stories. If you would like to participate, please email oabutton@gmail.com Professor Ernesto Priego, part of the team at City University London's Library and Information Science Course, was thankfully able to chat with us after a...
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    This title is SO meaningful. People always ask what librarians do in this digital-Google-era. Librarians enable access, that is what they do! And in many ways. In educating people on open access, how to search databases, by searching databases for patrons, by searching the full-text, by contacting other libraries to get interlibrary loans, etc. etc. etc. The role of the librarian today is still very important and relevant. Technologies did not diminish the role of the librarians, technologies pushed it to very advanced, specialized and precise roles.
ibudule

As Libraries Go Digital, Sharing of Data Conflicts With Tradition of Privacy - Technolo... - 6 views

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    Perhaps a bit narrow, but relevant to me. The article touches upon some aspects of privacy and openness bothering librarians. On the one hand people themselves are sharing lots of information about their reading lists, reading habits and favorites. On the other hand, libraries are trying to preserve patrons' privacy and protect their privacy from unwanted eyes.
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    This is very interesting, for once compiling the reading preferences of a user can help others researching or interested on the same topic access useful resources more easily. At the same time, this can be used to bias the reader towards a particular resource. Also it prompts the issue of profiling people for what they read.
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    This was a very interesting piece. I'd not heard of the Harvard Library Innovation Lab. Fascinating. Thanks for sharing. Libraries do indeed need to give much to benefit from collaborative tools. Love the Faustian Pact description. So true.
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    Gracias por compartirlo. Trabajo en una biblioteca universitaria y estoy interesada en la temática de innovación bibliotecaria.
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    I enjoyed this reading very much, thanks! Not to spoil the end, but it is a good comment that in order to protect the patrons' privacy, they must do their part too. If they use machines that requires to log in to Amazon, for example (I don't own a Kindle so I don't know it that is true), well, libraries cannot protect their privacy on what they are reading. Which reinforce the idea of the role that libraries should play in educating people about online privacy. the example of combining books that were borrowed by the same person that allows to identify the patron is very powerful and shows how something that looks innocent like a list of borrowed books can be harmful.
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    I think this article really demonstrates how the meaning of libraries is constantly in flux, and in recent decades has been evolving quicker than it has in perhaps the past couple of centuries. But the library has always been evolving, first mostly accessible to academics and eventually democratizing its mission by bringing literacy to the masses with public libraries. Now we are evolving to decide how open and social the patron habits should be. I think there is a way that libraries can adapt to this change and incorporate ways for patron data to inform the collection and recommendations, but also give patrons the option of being completely private, perhaps similar to an "incognito" browser window. Ultimately, the library should take privacy seriously and give patrons options that do not deceive. Thanks for sharing!
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