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arantzaprez

Open economics Webpage - 0 views

This page is really nice and talks about open economics models http://openeconomics.net/2013/08/30/open-economics-the-story-so-far/

open economics access

started by arantzaprez on 11 Dec 14 no follow-up yet
koobredaer

"Freedom for scholarship in the internet age" - 1 views

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    This is a thesis from a professor who occasionally teaches a Scholarly Communication course at UBC iSchool. It deals with complicated questions of economics of scholarly publishing. If you are looking for sources for research, there is a lot in here for you. Worth skimming through and reading any chapters of interest. "Freedom for Scholarship in the Internet Age examines distortion in the current scholarly communication system and alternatives, focusing on the potential of open access. High profits for a select few scholarly journal publishers in the area of science, technology, and medicine contrast with other portions of the scholarly publishing system such as university presses that are struggling to survive."
Kevin Stranack

Funding open access journal publishing - 2 views

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    "Although the Directory of Open Access Journals reports that nearly two-thirds of OA journals listed there do not charge authors, a recent study indicates that 50% of OA articles have been published after the author paid a fee." That still leaves at least 50% of OA journals that DO NOT charge author fees. This is often forgotten.
Kevin Stranack

How Old School Publishers Can Win In The Digital Age - 1 views

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    "Like many millennials today, Yale classmates Henry Luce and Briton Hadden left their jobs to create a startup. They found newspapers dry, longwinded and boring and thought they could do better by presenting stories in a faster paced, more personality centered format. In 1923 they launched Time magazine and it became a runaway success."
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    "The greatest challenge for publishers today is to create new business models. Unfortunately, most haven't even begun the process due to misplaced nostalgia for distribution revenue. In that sense, paywalls represent the greatest threat to old-line publishers."
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    And also due to the inherent feature of every human being of being resistant to changes. And all of that without taking into account some economical interests.
belgm241268

Human Factor in Innovation - 0 views

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    While we are at the discussion on copyrights, intellectual property and economics of open, I think the consideration of human factor in the pursuit of knowledge evens out the playing field. This is the link to the executive summary of The Global Innovation Index 2014, a report that takes into account the human factor in innovation.
Kevin Stranack

A Scalable and Sustainable Approach to Open Access (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu - 1 views

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    "Funded by tertiary institutions rather than individual researchers, this new model seeks to provide open access not just to traditional academic publications but to all forms of scholarly output."
Kevin Stranack

What Are the Costs of an Open Access Monograph? › Hybrid Publishing Lab Notepad - 0 views

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    "Although the official press release highlights that "Open Access publishing has no negative effect on book sales, and increases online usage and discovery considerably" (which is, in my opinion, only a snapshot which will sooner or later lose validity in the course of the ongoing digitalization of the academic book market), the most interesting and valuable outcomes of the pilot arise from the attempt to quantify and itemize the costs of an OA monograph."
Kevin Stranack

Monograph Publishing Pilot | Open Library of Humanities - 2 views

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    "building a low cost, sustainable, Open Access future for the humanities."
Kevin Stranack

A Scalable and Sustainable Approach to Open Access Publishing and Archiving for Humanit... - 2 views

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    A plan to convert traditional subscription publication formats, including society-published journals and books or monographs, to OA, based on an annual or multi-year payment made by every institution of higher education, no matter what its size or classification, and by any institution that benefits from the research that is generated by those within the academy.
Kevin Stranack

How it works - Knowledge Unlatched - 5 views

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    The Knowledge Unlatched model depends on many libraries from around the world sharing the payment of a single Title Fee to a publisher, in return for a book being made available on a Creative Commons licence via OAPEN and HathiTrust as a fully downloadable PDF.
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    This is a great slide show. Sums it all up. Thanks. I may pass this on to my collection development manager.
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    Great concept! This goes to show that Open Knowledge does not equate to free and giveaway. I love the blend of effectively using a crowd-funding model through libraries to ensure appropriate fees are paid to cover costs and compensate authors and publishers to enable open access under a CC license across a global library network. It would be interesting to see the follow up to this. I would think this approach would be useful for school libraries in a district or region to use this approach and effectively share the resources.
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    Interesting take on what will happen to the future of libraries and how information will be published and sold. It's important to realize that nothing comes free and that we should promote a business model that benefits content-producers as well as consumers.
Kevin Stranack

Universities 'get poor value' from academic journal-publishing firms | Science | thegua... - 4 views

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    Compares the cost of articles from society and non-profit publishers to those of the major commercial publishers.
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    An extremely powerful piece of research. I find it fascinating that the researchers were able to use US Freedom of Information Act requests to uncover the licensing costs. As a librarian, it is extremely frustrating to be bound by non-disclosure agreements when it comes to our subscriptions.
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    Its crazy. The numbers (of profit and control) for the publishing companies is astronomical!
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    Universities have received a poor deal from the system of private, subscription-based access to knowledge production since the port WW2 commercialization of the scientific publishing industry. It is absurd that the university or research funder supplies the content (the research), pays for the authoring (the time of the researcher writing the article), and provides and pays for the time of peer reviewers and academic editors. In addition, it often pays page charges or formatting charges to publishers. It then cedes copyright and finally buys back its own research at prices that have escalated at four times the rate of inflation in the past decade and a half! Considering most of this research is conducted using public funds, it becomes a moral argument when public resources are used once again to purchase access to the outputs of this research. The commercial model of disseminating research does not obey the rules of supply and demand. A relatively small number of 'core' journals occupy monopoly positions, in that university libraries have to subscribe to access their content, whatever the cost, because these journals have been established as 'must-have' resources. While the practice of 'bundling' offers the advantage of bulk pricing, it reduces room for choice, as bundles consume large chunks of library budgets, making it difficult to subscribe to smaller, individual titles. In addition, the inflexibility of indexing systems makes it difficult for new journals to establish themselves; thus compromising the potential for smaller niche subjects and newer interdisciplinary areas. Thankfully the global inequalities engendered by the commercialization of scholarly publishing are being challenged by open access.
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