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beetsyg

Hundreds of open access journals accept fake science paper | Higher Education Network |... - 5 views

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    This research study was an eye-opener for me. Until this point, I was completely unaware of these journal practices, although I had received several emails from journals I had never heard of wanting to publish papers based on conference presentations.
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    Although it is important to put those predatory journals under the spotlight so researchers don't fall in their trap, I always wince when I read one of those articles because too few take the time to talk about the good sides of open access journals and many readers will leave the article thinking that open access publishing is bad and not trustworthy. Of course, as mentioned in the Nature Mag article linked in the Guardian article, PLOS are excellent and have very high levels of evaluation, but they are not alone. And I have yet to find a paper that would make the same exercise with both open access journals and subscription-based journals so we could see how bad it is in the publishing world in general. That said, we must do everything within our power to stop those malpractices by predatory journals. (by the way, I have also received spam to publish in journals that were not even in my field of practice by BioMed Central. They are good, they are trustworthy. I wrote to them to say that it looks like baits to send spam calling me a Dr and inviting me to publish in fields that I know nothing about. They removed me from their mailing list but I don't know if they changed this practice)
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    A blog, Scholarly Open Access. Critical analysis of scholarly open-access publishing, http://scholarlyoa.com/, systematically lists fake academic journals and predatory publishers, who are taking advantage of a some open access naiveté.
Diane Vahab

List of Predatory Publications - 3 views

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    This list is not to be taken at face value (many of the publishers on it do have legitimate journals), but it serves as a reminder that there are many predatory journals that ask scholars to pay a lot of money to share their work, and many that also skirt traditional peer review processes in order to get money from unwary authors.
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    while the list is not provided as an evidence based indicator of relative credibility, Beall's site and blog do give quite a bit of 'food for thought'. There are certainly a number of dodgy publications, and like many I have been bombarded by invitations to publish, act as a guest editor etc. If you dont work for an organisation willing to pay the cost for open access publishing, it is an expensive option for individuals. There needs to be a clearer means of determining relevance and credibility of material at times.
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    Thank you for sharing this! I am in a process of publishing article myself. I've been though some interesting stuff as well. It is unbelievable how much fraud is going on in publishing world! I wish I could've known this website before (added to my bookmarks :)
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    Will show to some colleagues who sometimes are interesteed in publishing issues.
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    Lists by By Jeffrey Beall of predatory journals Released January 2, 2014
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