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meghankelly492

"Can't We Just Change the Words?": EBSCOhost - 1 views

  • The idea of wanting to be true to the music of a culture, to the people of that culture, and to one's students in teaching is at the heart of the discussion of authenticity.
  • However, teaching music without attention to its cultural context is a problem in several respects: it risks misrepresenting the musical practice being studied, it fails to take advantage of the potential benefits of culturally infused music teaching, and it promotes a conception of music as isolated sonic events rather than meaningful human practices.2 Discussion about this struggle to balance accurate performance practice with accessibility has focused on the concept of authenticity
  • The definitions of authenticity represented in the music education literature fall into four models: the continuum model; the twofold historical/personal model; the threefold reproduction, reality, and relevance model; and the moving-beyond-authenticity model.
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  • how does each author use authenticity as a strategy for making or justifying decisions in music education?
  • authenticity enhances an aesthetic experience; for others, authentic musical encounters enhance student motivation
  • since the original loses some of its essential qualities in a simplification.5
  • His view of historical authenticity calls for knowing the intentions of the composer, the performance practice of the time, using period instruments, and being musically creative within the boundaries of the composer's intentions
  • Peter Kivy's twofold model of authenticity. Focusing on historical authenticity in performance, Kivy explores two main aspects of authenticity: historical (attention to the intent, sound, and practice of the original) and personal (interpretation and expression of the performer).
  • Swanwick writes: "'Authentic' musical experience occurs when individuals make and take music as meaningful or relevant for them"
  • Swanwick's emphasis on the importance of personal relevance yields different choices for a music teacher than Palmer's position does.
  • Another example is found in the work of music educator and researcher Kay Edwards, who also reached the conclusion that attention to authenticity increases student response to learning. In her qualitative study of the response of children to a unit on Native American music, she found that the group using instruments of the Navajo, Hopi, Apache, and Yaqui peoples generated more journal responses overall (her criterion measure) and more responses about instrument playing than the groups with the inauthentic (traditional music room) instruments.
  • Using indigenous instruments, original languages, and involving culture bearers in instruction benefits student involvement and interest as well as helps them develop musical skills. Connecting the story of a piece of music to students' own experiences and encouraging students to create new music in the style of music being studied help facilitate meaningful experiences for students.
  • "World music pedagogy concerns itself with how music is taught/transmitted and received/learned within cultures, and how best the processes that are included in significant ways within these cultures can be preserved or at least partially retained in classrooms and rehearsal halls.
tapiatanova

A Social Network Can Be a Learning Network - The Digital Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 98 views

  • Sharing student work on a course blog is an example of what Randall Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, of Georgetown University, call "social pedagogies." They define these as "design approaches for teaching and learning that engage students with what we might call an 'authentic audience' (other than the teacher), where the representation of knowledge for an audience is absolutely central to the construction of knowledge in a course."
    • tab_ras
       
      Very important - social pedagogies for authentic tasks - a key for integrating SNTs in the classroom.
    • Daniel Spielmann
       
      Agreed, for connectivism see also www.connectivism.ca
  • External audiences certainly motivate students to do their best work. But students can also serve as their own authentic audience when asked to create meaningful work to share with one another.
    • Daniel Spielmann
       
      The last sentence is especially important in institutional contexts where the staff voices their distrust against "open scholarship" (Weller 2011), web 2.0 and/or open education. Where "privacy" is deemed the most important thing in dealing with new technologies, advocates of an external audience have to be prepared for certain questions.
    • tapiatanova
       
      yes! nothing but barriers! However, it is unclear if the worries about pravacy are in regards to students or is it instructors who fear teaching in the open. everyone cites FERPA and protection of student identities, but I have yet to hear any student refusing to work in the open...
  • Students most likely won't find this difficult. After all, you're asking them to surf the Web and tag pages they like. That's something they do via Facebook every day. By having them share course-related content with their peers in the class, however, you'll tap into their desires to be part of your course's learning community. And you might be surprised by the resources they find and share.
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  • back-channel conversations
  • While keynote speakers and session leaders are speaking, audience members are sharing highlights, asking questions, and conversing with colleagues on Twitter
    • tab_ras
       
      An effective use of Twitter that can be translated to classrooms.
    • Daniel Spielmann
       
      All classrooms?
    • John Dorn
       
      classrooms where students are motivated to learn. Will this work in a HS classroom where kids just view their phones as a means to check up on people? Maybe if they can see "cool" class could be if they were responsible for the freedoms that would be needed to use twitter or other similar sites.
  • Ask your students to create accounts on Twitter or some other back-channel tool and share ideas that occur to them in your course. You might give them specific assignments, as does the University of Connecticut's Margaret Rubega, who asks students in her ornithology class to tweet about birds they see. During a face-to-face class session, you could have students discuss their reading in small groups and share observations on the back channel. Or you could simply ask them to post a single question about the week's reading they would like to discuss.
  • A back channel provides students a way to stay connected to the course and their fellow students. Students are often able to integrate back channels into their daily lives, checking for and sending updates on their smartphones, for instance. That helps the class become more of a community and gives students another way to learn from each other.
  • Deep learning is hard work, and students need to be well motivated in order to pursue it. Extrinsic factors like grades aren't sufficient—they motivate competitive students toward strategic learning and risk-averse students to surface learning.
  • Social pedagogies provide a way to tap into a set of intrinsic motivations that we often overlook: people's desire to be part of a community and to share what they know with that community.
  • Online, social pedagogies can play an important role in creating such a community. These are strong motivators, and we can make use of them in the courses we teach.
  • The papers they wrote for my course weren't just academic exercises; they were authentic expressions of learning, open to the world as part of their "digital footprints."
    • Daniel Spielmann
       
      Yes, but what is the relation between such writing and ("proper"?) academic writing?
  • Collaborative documents need not be text-based works. Sarah C. Stiles, a sociologist at Georgetown, has had her students create collaborative timelines showing the activities of characters in a text, using a presentation tool called Prezi.com. I used that tool to have my cryptography students create a map of the debate over security and privacy. They worked in small groups to brainstorm arguments, and contributed those arguments to a shared debate map synchronously during class.
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    A great blog post on social pedagogies and how they can be incorporated in university/college classes. A good understanding of creating authentic learning experiences through social media.
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    A great blog post on social pedagogies and how they can be incorporated in university/college classes. A good understanding of creating authentic learning experiences through social media.
  •  
    A great blog post on social pedagogies and how they can be incorporated in university/college classes. A good understanding of creating authentic learning experiences through social media.
Josh Flores

Motherlode - Whose Failing Grade Is It? Child's or Parents'? - NYTimes.com - 69 views

    • Josh Flores
       
      Model for Rhetorical Arguement and Authentic Substantive Conversation in the classroom. Appeals: Ethos (Blue) - Ethics and Morals Logos (Green) - Logic and Reasoning Pathos (Pink) - Emotions and Feelings
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    Model for Rhetorical Arguement and Authentic Substantive Conversation in the classroom. Appeals: Ethos (Blue) - Ethics and Morals Logos (Green) - Logic and Reasoning Pathos (Pink) - Emotions and Feelings
Eric Robertson

New Podcast: Classroom Identity and Authenticity - 11 views

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    As a former Bailey student and current community college professor, Soza has been inspired to spend seven years researching Dr. Bailey's life and work, particularly her unshakeable belief in her students' potential and profoundly effective non-traditional teaching approaches. Professor Soza explains how Bailey's authenticity and willingness to share so much of her self-her paintings, her scholarship, her travel experiences, and even her home-left behind a legacy of students whose lives were transformed by their professor's faith and personal investment in them.
Diana Irene Saldana

Mix It Up! Authentic Activities for the World Language Classroom | Edutopia - 46 views

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    hen dreaming up new activities, our main focus should always be authenticity. If we make activities genuine, our students will be much more inclined to participate.
tab_ras

QUT | Journal of Learning Design - 4 views

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    Designing active and authentic learning experiences The Journal of Learning Designis an educational journal which moves beyond a focus on technological applications in educational settings, to encourage more critical analysis of approaches to the design of learning environments and the extent to which they result in enhanced learning outcomes for learners. Traditional, didactic, delivery-focussed models of teaching in higher education are still common, whether in the lecture theatre or in the online environment. The Journal of Learning Designaims to raise awareness beyond such transmission models of education, to the design of more active, collaborative, authentic and engaging learning experiences. The Journal of Learning Designaims to provide a forum for critical debate and professional exchange about models, theoretical positioning and best practice in learning design.
meghankelly492

Music That Represents Culture: Selecting Music with Integrity: EBSCOhost - 4 views

  • The term authenticity has been applied to music in various ways. It might be used to describe a piece of music (recorded, notated, performed); the process by which the music is taught and learned ( through recordings, live models, notation); or the manner in which it is performed (venue, dress, behaviors).
  • In other words, authenticity lies within the perceptions of the individual.
  • Anthony Palmer, who teaches music education at Boston University, has said that music with "absolute authenticity" is performed (a) by and for members of the culture; (b) in a typical setting, as determined by the members of the culture; (c) with instruments specified by the creator(s) of the music; and (d) in its original language.[ 8] Inarguably, and as Palmer recognizes, attaining this level of authenticity is impossible in a school music program (unless we consider "school music" residing within a unique culture of its own). In school, music is separated from its primary source many times over. Music is passed from its primary source (composer, grandmother) to an intermediary (arranger, performer, notation, recording) and channeled through a publisher or presenter to the teacher and finally to students. To confound matters, there are variants of melodies, lyrics, dances, games, and performance styles.
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  • Ethnomusicologist Bruno Nettl explains that "societies differ, however, in their attitude toward musical stability; to some it is important that a song remain stable and unchanged, while in others individual singers are encouraged to have their personal versions."
  • but he believes educators must determine at what point that musical experience is no longer acceptable as representative of that culture.
  • Having clear visions of educational goals and the broad curriculum is vital to making these determinations.
  • Bennett Reimer states, "Those inner workings are themselves the project of cultural systems, so they must be revealed in their contexts, historical, cultural, and political, in order to be grasped appropriately; that is, 'knowing about' becomes an essential ingredient of artistry and of listening."[ 15] For example, children might not fully understand the meaning of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" unless they understand what baseball is or realize that the song is traditionally sung at baseball games.
  • text in an unfamiliar language should include a translation so students understand the meaning of the words.
  • However, a culturally valid work is not necessarily bias free; and conversely, bias-free music is not necessarily culturally valid.
  • Selecting the best music to represent a culture in an unbiased manner is a process of discovery. You will first need to educate yourself before you can educate others.
Steve Ransom

BBC News - Plagiarism: The Ctrl+C, Ctrl+V boom - 87 views

  • "There's no such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity."
  • "Being 'original' does not mean having novel ideas never before expressed by a human. It simply means doing the work for yourself."
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    "There's no such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity." Carroll agrees: "Being 'original' does not mean having novel ideas never before expressed by a human. It simply means doing the work for yourself."
Josh Flores

Meet Banshee, Havok, 'n' Beast - 27 views

    • Josh Flores
       
      Model of students struggling to be seen as "normal".
    • Josh Flores
       
      Model of students with social anxiety
    • Josh Flores
       
      The teacher acknowledges that failure is part of the learning process but also demonstrates the importance of having trust in the student after specifically stating his expectations.  Stating expectations and following it up with trust is important for fostering a Student-Centered learning environment.  Too few educators are willing to let go of control and allow students to become empowered by their own curiosity.
    • Josh Flores
       
      Model of students with unique talents
    • Josh Flores
       
      The teacher demonstrates authentic research by creating a product to test rather than simply look at research and respond with a traditional essay.
Melissa Enderle

Image Forensics : Error Level Analysis - 90 views

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    Submit the URL of a JPEG image to this site and it instantly highlights possible alterations, helping determining authenticity of an image. Great tool for teaching about internet evaluation.
Robert Alford

Home - public - Global Challenge Award - 5 views

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    Global Challenge Award's mission is "to provide high school students worldwide, the tools and confidence to solve global problems together" We do this by providing students with "authentic project-based learning experience" working in small global teams to solve climate change issues.
Marc Patton

Edudemic - Education Technology, Apps, Product Reviews, and Social Media - 51 views

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    So we're making people smart not by offering access to huge volumes of information, but rather by pulling back the curtains on the learning process. Public and private, K-12 and higher ed, formal and informal, academic and authentic, our goal is to mainstream the learning process.
Marita Thomson

Challenge Based Learning - 125 views

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    Challenge Based Learning applies what is known about the emerging learning styles of high school students and leverages the powerful new technologies that provide new opportunities to learn to provide an authentic learning process that challenges students to make a difference.
Josh Flores

Education Article :: Top 12 Ways to Enjoy Your Teaching Job - 137 views

  • Say your “thank yous” and “good jobs” in hopes that this positivity will come back to you.
  • Learn
  • learn from a peer
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    Education Article :: Top 12 Ways to Enjoy Your Teaching Job http://bit.ly/mdzDfX via TeachHub Check out the "Live and Learn Like a Kid" section at the end of the article. It highlights some aspects of authentic learning and teaching in the classroom.
Kelly Boushell

Interactive Constitution - 9 views

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    An interactive approach to the Constitution of The United States of America. Includes images, authentic language, common language, and links to other resources.
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