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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Jason Schmidt

Jason Schmidt

SOPHIA and the Flipped Classroom - 20 views

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    Become a certified flipped classroom teacher.
Gil Anspacher

Diigo EDU School Account Admin Questions - 98 views

started by Gil Anspacher on 25 Apr 11 no follow-up yet
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  • Jason Schmidt
     
    As far as I know, there is no district or school feature for Diigo educator accounts. Each teacher will need to create an account (or you can create special accounts for them in the teacher console). From there, I don't think there would be anything stopping you from having the teachers create groups for their classes and having the students join them. I can't remember if 'student' accounts can create groups or not. If not, you as the admin could create groups for the classes and assign the students to the appropriate groups.

    This is something I'm pretty sure Diigo is looking at, but it wouldn't hurt to put in a feature request. This could be a powerful tool...
Jason Schmidt

Help us connect all US schools with international communities. | Connect all Schools - 48 views

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    Connect All Schools shares stories and connections made by classrooms in the US. Their goal is to connect every classroom in the country with an international partner.
Jason Schmidt

Curriki - 6eslessonplan - 73 views

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    6E+S lesson plan format. Encourages constructivist, student-centered learning and instruction.
Jason Schmidt

School Would Be Great If It Weren't for the Damn Kids - 95 views

  • It simply doesn’t make sense to try to “purge ‘ineffective’ teachers and principals.”  His listener, almost giddy with gratitude now, prepares to chime in, as Samuelson, without pausing, delivers the punch line:  That’s right, it’s time to stop blaming teachers and start . . . blaming students!
  • His focus is not on students’ achievements (the intellectual accomplishments of individual kids) but only on “student achievement” (the aggregate results of standardized tests)
  • As I’ve noted elsewhere, we have reason to worry when schooling is discussed primarily in the context of “global competitiveness” rather than in terms of what children need or what contributes to a democratic culture
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • Upon hearing someone castigate students for being insufficiently motivated, a noneconomist might be inclined to ask two questions.  The first is:  “Motivated to do what, exactly”?  Anything they’re told, no matter how unengaging, inappropriate, or, well, demotivating? 
  • Whenever I see students made to cram facts into their short-term memories for a test, practice a series of decontextualized skills on yet another worksheet, listen passively to a lecture, or inch their way through the insipid prose of a corporate-produced textbook, I find myself thinking of a comment made by Frederick Herzberg, a critic of traditional workplace management:  “Idleness, indifference, and irresponsibility,” he said, “are healthy responses to absurd work.”
  • The more you reward people for doing something, or for doing it well, the less interest they typically come to have in whatever they had to do to get the reward. 
  • People who blame students for not being “motivated” tend to think educational success mean little more than higher scores on bad tests and they’re apt to see education itself as a means to making sure our corporations will beat their corporations.  The sort of schooling that results is the type almost guaranteed to . . . kill students’ motivation.
  • one thing that’s happened is a concatenation of rewards and punishments, including grades, which teach students that learning is just a means to an end.
  • Another thing that’s happened is teaching that’s meant primarily to raise test scores.
  • inner-city kids get the worst of the sort of schooling that’s not about exploring and discovering and questioning but only about working hard (often at rote tasks) and being nice (read: obedient).
  • “Motivation is weak because more students…don't like school, don't work hard and don't do well.”  But why don’t they like school (which is the key to understanding why, assuming his premise is correct, they don’t succeed)?  What has happened to their desire to figure out how things work, the hunger to make sense of things, with which all children start out? 
  • if you want to see (intrinsically) motivated kids, you need to visit classrooms or schools that take a nontraditional approach to education, places where students are more likely to be absorbed and frequently delighted, where what they’re doing is not merely “rigorous” (a word often applied to very difficult busywork) but meaningful.
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    Alfie Kohn's commentary on an article written by Robert J. Samuelson. Samuelson argues in his article that the problem with education reform is not the usual suspects like ineffective teachers, but kids who are lazy and unmotivated. Interesting read with thoughtful information about student motivation.
Jason Schmidt

dianeravitch.mp3 (audio/mpeg Object) - 25 views

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    In case you missed Steve Hargadon's interview with Diane Ravitch on October 26, 2010.
Jason Schmidt

Classics for Kids - 81 views

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    Great music education resource. Provides the opportunity to listen to classical music and gives excellent support materials.
Jason Schmidt

Wikiversity - 76 views

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    Open educational content
Jason Schmidt

Underground Railroad--History of Slavery, Pictures, Information - 111 views

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    Great interactive about the Underground Railroad.
Jason Schmidt

Online Professional Development | iEARN-USA: International Education and Resource Network - 41 views

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    Work together with educators from all over the world to develop a collaborative project. Online course.
natanmeir

Group Projects with Diigo - 100 views

groups education higher_education
  • Jason Schmidt
     
    My suggestion would be to create a large group where everyone can share resources, and then smaller groups for individual projects. If your students are using the toolbar, it would be really easy for them to share resources with the different groups.

    Another idea might be to have each small group together and use a tag (like the course and session number) for the whole class.

    I would be interested to hear how this whole thing works out. Feel free to contact me on Twitter or through Diigo (jasonschmidt123 in both places) if there's any way I can help you out.
  • Jason Schmidt
     
    @Linda - unfortunately at this time, I'm not aware of a quicker way to do this. Diigo is very responsive to their users, so this might be something to request from them.
Jason Schmidt

Collaborative Learning Home - Collaborative Learning - 77 views

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    Wiki from 2009 Learning@School conference. Contains lots of great collaborative tools and ideas for using collaboration in the classroom.
Jason Schmidt

Identity Day Presentation - Google Docs - 45 views

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    Notes and links from George Couros identity day presentation for Reform Symposium 2010.
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