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Elizabeth Kahn

How to Integrate Tech When It Keeps Changing | Edutopia - 61 views

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    Great article from Edutopia explaining why we need to persevere with technology integration.
Greg Limperis

Technology Integration in Education - Facilitating the Use of Technology in the Classroom - 15 views

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    "Are you an educator who has no time to surf the internet for great resources that will help you integrate technology into your daily teaching? Have you ever wished that there could be one central starting point in your search for great edtech resources? " Then T.I.E. is the site for you! Form or join a group, read a news feed, participate in an event, discuss or blog about a topic, watch or share a video, and so much more!
Jim Tiffin Jr

The Tech Commandments - 204 views

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    A Presenter at NYSCATE11, Adam Bellow lays out his ideas for the successful integration of technology into the existing educational system.
Mr Casal

50 Ways to Integrate Technology - 193 views

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    Ways to Anchor Technology in Your Classroom Tomorrow
A Gardner

EdTechInnovators - 105 views

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    Go to the Tools and Resources Tabs for: tutorials for various Web 2.0 tools, student examples, practical information for integration of technology at every level. These guys were phenomenal at the NSTA conference in San Francisco!
Julie Whitehead

Technology Integration - Download free content from Edutopia on iTunes - 81 views

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    Integrating technology into classroom instruction means more than teaching basic computer skills and software programs in a separate computer class. Effective tech integration must happen across the curriculum in ways that research shows deepen and enhance the learning process. In particular, it must support four key components of learning: active engagement, participation in groups, frequent interaction and feedback, and connection to real-world experts. Effective technology integration is achieved when the use of technology is routine and transparent and when technology supports curricular goals.
Aly Kenee

Technology Integration Matrix | Arizona K12 Center - 195 views

    • Aly Kenee
       
      This is a great goal -- but it does take persistence and vision.
  • Through regular classroom observation and targeted professional development activities, it is our hope that over time teachers will be able to effectively monitor their progress through a continuum of technology integration levels
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    The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) illustrates how teachers can use technology to enhance learning for K-12 students. The TIM incorporates five interdependent characteristics of meaningful learning environments: active, collaborative, constructive, authentic, and goal directed (Jonassen, Howland, Moore, & Marra, 2003). The TIM associates five levels of technology integration (i.e., entry, adoption, adaptation, infusion, and transformation) with each of the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments. Together, the five levels of technology integration and the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments create a matrix of 25 cells.
Elizabeth Pierce-Fortin

iLearn Technology - 98 views

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    integrating technology in the classroom
Al Tucker

Interesting Ways | edte.ch - 90 views

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    Great resources full of great and practical ideas to use various technolgies by Tom Barrett. Share them with your colleagues!
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    The Interesting Ways series continues to be a great example of crowdsourcing good quality classroom ideas and it has been a privilege connecting with all of the people who have taken time to add an idea.
Terri Friebohle

Symbaloo | Access your bookmarks anywhere | iGoogle alternative - 49 views

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    Collect your own or find websites others have contributed!
Marc Safran

Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants - 1 views

  • Our students have changed radically. Today’s students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.
  • today's students think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors
  • we can say with certainty that their thinking patterns have changed
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • The importance of the distinction is this: As Digital Immigrants learn - like all immigrants, some better than others - to adapt to their environment, they always retain, to some degree, their "accent," that is, their foot in the past.
  • There are hundreds of examples of the digital immigrant accent. 
  • our Digital Immigrant instructors, who speak an outdated language (that of the pre-digital age), are struggling to teach a population that speaks an entirely new language
  • Digital Immigrant teachers assume that learners are the same as they have always been, and that the same methods that worked for the teachers when they were students will work for their students now. But that assumption is no longer valid. Today's learners are different.
  • So what should happen?  Should the Digital Native students learn the old ways, or should their Digital Immigrant educators learn the new? 
  • methodology
  • learn to communicate in the language and style of their students
  • it does mean going faster, less step-by step, more in parallel, with more random access, among other thing
  • kinds of content
  • As educators, we need to be thinking about how to teach both Legacy and Future content in the language of the Digital Natives.
  • Adapting materials to the language of Digital Natives has already been done successfully.  My own preference for teaching Digital Natives is to invent computer games to do the job, even for the most serious content.
  • "Why not make the learning into a video game!
  • But while the game was easy for my Digital Native staff to invent, creating the content turned out to be more difficult for the professors, who were used to teaching courses that started with "Lesson 1 – the Interface."  We asked them instead to create a series of graded tasks into which the skills to be learned were embedded. The professors had made 5-10 minute movies to illustrate key concepts; we asked them to cut them to under 30 seconds. The professors insisted that the learners to do all the tasks in order; we asked them to allow random access. They wanted a slow academic pace, we wanted speed and urgency (we hired a Hollywood script writer to provide this.)   They wanted written instructions; we wanted computer movies. They wanted the traditional pedagogical language of "learning objectives," "mastery", etc. (e.g. "in this exercise you will learn"); our goal was to completely eliminate any language that even smacked of education.
  • large mind-shift required
  • We need to invent Digital Native methodologies for all subjects, at all levels, using our students to guide us.
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    Our students have changed radically. Today's students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.
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