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Tracy Tuten

A Solution for Bad Teaching - NYTimes.com - 118 views

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    On teaching and research and incongruence in the profession of professing
Steven Szalaj

What Machines Can't Do - NYTimes.com - 69 views

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    An Op-Ed piece by David Brooks that looks at what we can do that computers cannot do very well or at all.  It points to five things that education might seek to develop in our students.
Roland Gesthuizen

The High Cost of Low Teacher Salaries - NYTimes.com - 59 views

  • The first step is to make the teaching profession more attractive to college graduates. This will take some doing
  • So how do teachers cope? Sixty-two percent work outside the classroom to make ends meet.
  • We’ve been working with public school teachers for 10 years; every spring, we see many of the best teachers leave the profession. They’re mowed down by the long hours, low pay, the lack of support and respect.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • eople talk about accountability, measurements, tenure, test scores and pay for performance. These questions are worthy of debate, but are secondary to recruiting and training teachers and treating them fairly.
  • most of all, they trust their teachers. They are rightly seen as the solution, not the problem, and when improvement is needed, the school receives support and development, not punishment.
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    "And yet in education we do just that. When we don't like the way our students score on international standardized tests, we blame the teachers. When we don't like the way particular schools perform, we blame the teachers and restrict their resources."
Don Doehla

The Shanghai Secret - NYTimes.com - 26 views

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    HANGHAI - Whenever I visit China, I am struck by the sharply divergent predictions of its future one hears. Lately, a number of global investors have been "shorting" China, betting that someday soon its powerful economic engine will sputter, as the real estate boom here turns to a bust. Frankly, if I were shorting China today, it would not be because of the real estate bubble, but because of the pollution bubble that is increasingly enveloping some of its biggest cities. Optimists take another view: that, buckle in, China is just getting started, and that what we're now about to see is the payoff from China's 30 years of investment in infrastructure and education. I'm not a gambler, so I'll just watch this from the sidelines. But if you're looking for evidence as to why the optimistic bet isn't totally crazy, you might want to visit a Shanghai elementary school.
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    HANGHAI - Whenever I visit China, I am struck by the sharply divergent predictions of its future one hears. Lately, a number of global investors have been "shorting" China, betting that someday soon its powerful economic engine will sputter, as the real estate boom here turns to a bust. Frankly, if I were shorting China today, it would not be because of the real estate bubble, but because of the pollution bubble that is increasingly enveloping some of its biggest cities. Optimists take another view: that, buckle in, China is just getting started, and that what we're now about to see is the payoff from China's 30 years of investment in infrastructure and education. I'm not a gambler, so I'll just watch this from the sidelines. But if you're looking for evidence as to why the optimistic bet isn't totally crazy, you might want to visit a Shanghai elementary school.
Don Doehla

The Not-So-Hidden Cause Behind the A.D.H.D. Epidemic - NYTimes.com - 58 views

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    Between the fall of 2011 and the spring of 2012, people across the United States suddenly found themselves unable to get their hands on A.D.H.D. medication. Low-dose generics were particularly in short supply. There were several factors contributing to the shortage, but the main cause was that supply was suddenly being outpaced by demand.
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    Between the fall of 2011 and the spring of 2012, people across the United States suddenly found themselves unable to get their hands on A.D.H.D. medication. Low-dose generics were particularly in short supply. There were several factors contributing to the shortage, but the main cause was that supply was suddenly being outpaced by demand.
smilex3md

Educators Study Online Dishonesty - NYTimes.com - 67 views

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    New ways to trip up plagiarism detection software and online cheating.
Enid Baines

Why Do I Teach? - NYTimes.com - 23 views

  • They make students vividly aware of new possibilities for intellectual and aesthetic fulfillment—pleasure, to give its proper name.  They may not enjoy every book we read, but they enjoy some of them and learn that—and how—this sort of thing (Greek philosophy, modernist literature) can be enjoyable. 
  • We should judge teaching not by the amount of knowledge it passes on, but by the enduring excitement it generates. Knowledge, when it comes, is a later arrival, flaring up, when the time is right, from the sparks good teachers have implanted in their students’ souls.
Enid Baines

In a Gaudy Theme Park, Jay-Z Meets J-Gatz - NYTimes.com - 22 views

  • “But what most people don’t understand is that the adjective ‘Great’ in the title was meant laconically,” he said. “There’s nothing genuinely great about Gatsby. He’s a poignant phony.
  • Owing to the money-addled society we live in, people have lost the irony of Fitzgerald’s title. So the movies become complicit in the excessively materialistic culture that the novel set out to criticize.”
Andrew McCluskey

Teachers - Will We Ever Learn? - NYTimes.com - 181 views

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    I get very tired of having people point to Singapore as a good model for education. Singaporeans score well on tests because their life depends on it. Doing poorly on the PSLE taken at the end of sixth grade virtually guarantees you will never attend university and will limit your income for the rest of your life. Parents in Singapore spend thousands every year on private tuition, the sole goal of which is to produce high test scores. Singapore also recognizes that they are not producing creative students. In fact they wish they were more like the US.
Margaret FalerSweany

Gun Owners Aren't Always Gun Lovers - NYTimes.com - 1 views

  • gun owners like Michael Kundu come from a largely unexplored middle ground — a place of nuance and contradiction.
  • these voices of ambivalence that policy makers say are likely to be drowned out by the passion at the extreme ends
Margaret FalerSweany

Living With Less. A Lot Less. - NYTimes.com - 17 views

  • Somehow this stuff ended up running my life, or a lot of it; the things I consumed ended up consuming me. My circumstances are unusual (not everyone gets an Internet windfall before turning 30), but my relationship with material things isn’t.
Victoria Zhang

What's the Answer for Older People Who Are Out of Work? - Room for Debate - NYTimes.com - 22 views

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    Baby boomers have been hit hard by the recession. Millions of people in their 50s and 60s are unemployed; some have retired but wish they were still working. And yet research shows that older people have much to offer, particularly as educators and child care providers.
Andrew McCluskey

The Essay, an Exercise in Doubt - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • The Essay, an Exercise in Doubt

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    Phillip Lopate writes about the virtue of self-doubt and how it (self-doubt) is built into essay writing as a form.
MaryLiz Jones

StudentsFirst Issues Low Ratings on School Policies - NYTimes.com - 24 views

  • States that have adopted policies aligned with the StudentsFirst platform have in some cases met with public opposition. In Idaho, the Legislature passed a package in 2010 that eliminated tenure, introduced performance pay for teachers and based their evaluations on student test scores. Voters overturned the measures in a referendum in November. (The state received a D-minus grade from StudentsFirst.)
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    Idaho's rating
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